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NPR Story
3:47 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Space Robot Designed As Companion For Japanese Astronaut

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 5:24 pm

Japan has launched a humanoid robot bound for the International Space Station to keep one of its astronauts company.

Space
2:28 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

No Tax Dollars Went To Make This Space Viking Photo

The Vikings Have Landed: Photographer Ved Chirayath staged this photograph in Palo Alto Foothills Park in California last December.
Courtesy of Ved Chirayath

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:02 pm

Scrutinizing the books of government agencies can turn up lavish parties or illicit trips at the taxpayers' expense. But not every investigation turns out that way. And when they don't, the hunt for waste can appear to be a waste itself.

Such appears to be the case with a recent inquiry involving NASA and Viking re-enactors. This whole saga began with an idea from Ved Chirayath, an aeronautics graduate student at Stanford University who loves photography. He was talking over what to shoot one day with a colleague, and thought of Vikings.

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Technology
1:22 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Bracing For Google Glass: An In-Your-Face Technology

A conference attendee tries Google Glass during the Google I/O developer conference in San Francisco in May.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

The likes of you and I can't buy Google Glass yet. It's available only to the select developers and opinion-makers who have been permitted to spring $1,500 for the privilege of having the first one on the block. But I've seen a few around my San Francisco neighborhood among the young techies who commute down to the Google and Facebook campuses in WiFi-equipped shuttle buses or who pedal downtown to Zynga and Twitter on their fixies.

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World Cafe
1:00 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Next: Rose Windows

Rose Windows.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 4:46 pm

Rose Windows' debut album, The Sun Dogs, is steeped in '60s classic rock, recalling the heavy organ sounds of The Doors and the folk-infused flutes of Traffic. Formed in 2010 by songwriter Chris Cheveyo, the Seattle septet signed a label deal earlier this year, then put together an album that's layered with Middle Eastern influences.

Hear two songs from The Sun Dogs, a mellow combination of psychedelic folk and blues-rock instrumentation.

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Music Reviews
12:35 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Vince Gill And Paul Franklin Ain't 'Foolin' Around' With Bakersfield Sound

Vince Gill (left) and Paul Franklin.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 1:21 pm

Country-music star Vince Gill and steel guitarist Paul Franklin have teamed up to record a new concept album called Bakersfield. Their idea is to cover hits from the 1960s and '70s by two artists who helped define the Bakersfield, Calif., country sound: Merle Haggard and the Strangers and Buck Owens and the Buckaroos. But this is no nostalgia-fest — it's a vital testament to music that retains energy and innovation.

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Author Interviews
12:32 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Talent Or Skill?: Homing In On The Elusive 'Sports Gene'

According to author David Epstein, hitters like the Los Angeles Angels' Albert Pujols look at the movement of the pitcher's shoulder, torso or hand to help them hit the ball.
Brian Bahr Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 10:59 pm

We've all had the experience of watching a great athletic performance — from gymnast Mary Lou Retton defying gravity to Michael Jordan sinking a mind-blowing turnaround jumper — and wondered: Were they born with that talent or can you get there with hard work and practice?

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Parallels
11:49 am
Mon August 5, 2013

World War II Researchers Say 'Italian Schindler' Was A Myth

The Risiera di San Sabba in Trieste was used during World War II as the only death camp on Italian soil. In the building's courtyard, the outline on the brick wall is where the crematorium was located.
Sylvia Poggioli NPR

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 5:24 pm

A group of Italian researchers who have studied troves of World War II documents have found no evidence that Giovanni Palatucci, a police official long credited as the "Italian Schindler," saved the lives of 5,000 Jews.

The findings are demolishing the Italian national icon and angering supporters of the man who has been honored at Israel's Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial, and who has been put on the track to sainthood.

'Unfounded' Claims Of Heroism?

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Parallels
11:22 am
Mon August 5, 2013

A West Bank Spring At The Center Of Deadly Struggle

Palestinian Bashir Tamimi, 57, drinks water from a spring on land that he says belongs to his family. Teenagers from a nearby Israeli settlement built collection pools and brought in picnic tables when they saw no one using the spring. It has now become a source of conflict.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 9:00 am

There's a pretty little spring in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, where fresh water has dripped from the rock, probably for centuries.

Now it is the center of a deadly struggle over land.

Israeli teenagers from Halamish, the Jewish settlement a short walk uphill, found the spring several years ago. It flows from a small cave.

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Music
11:06 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Singer Alice Smith: 'I've Always Been Myself'

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 11:44 am

Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Alice Smith has managed to keep her music unique, despite pressure from music labels. She joins host Michel Martin for a special performance chat of her latest album She.

Remembrances
11:06 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Civil Rights Leader Julius Chambers Fought Through Courts

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 11:44 am

Julius Chambers argued numerous civil rights cases before the U.S. Supreme Court - and won them all. Host Michel Martin remembers the groundbreaking attorney, who passed away recently at the age of 76.

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