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Sweetness And Light
12:55 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Pete Rose Should Enter The Hall Of Fame With Ichiro Suzuki

Former baseball player Pete Rose at a boxing event in Oakland, Calif., on Sept. 8, 2012.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 8:16 am

In Japan, a noren is a short curtain that hangs to the entrance of a little teahouse or restaurant. It is not solid, but made of strips, and so when you go through it, your hand goes first, then your arm, and the rest of you, but quickly the strips fall back into place, and it is as if a wisp, a ghost, a sprite has passed through.

I always visualized Ichiro Suzuki that way, slipping from Japanese baseball to our major leagues so effortlessly, barely stirring the air.

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The Salt
5:16 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

In Iraq, Laying Claim To The Kebab

Many different Middle Eastern cultures claim to have invented the kebab.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 8:54 pm

When you hear the word "kebab" in America, you might think of skewers with chunks of chicken or beef and vegetables, marinated and grilled on coals or gas. But say "kebab" in the Middle East, and it means a lot of things — chunks of lamb or liver on skewers, or the more popular version of grilled ground meat logs found in Turkey, Iran and much of the Arab world.

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All Tech Considered
4:44 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Hacking Real Things Becomes Child's Play At This Camp

Owen Chilcoat hacking his tablet. "I am just messing around ... trying to break it," he says.
Steve Henn NPR

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:56 am

At r00tz, a camp that takes place each year during the Def Con convention in Las Vegas, children learn to pick locks, hack smart TVs and, most important, how to take apart and understand the technology that surrounds them.

The scene inside the camp a couple weeks ago was a bit of a madhouse — controlled chaos. Little kids everywhere. Brendan Herman was trying to program a machine to draw pictures on ping-pong balls, wearing a tinfoil hat.

"To protect me from aliens," he said.

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Code Switch
4:33 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

For a Stop-And-Frisk Plaintiff, A 'Heartbreaking' Birthday

Nicholas Peart, far left, was stopped by police on his 18th birthday.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 12:54 pm

Not long ago, we wrote about The Talk, the conversation that many young men of color get from their parents about how to manage being seen as suspicious and navigate fraught encounters with police officers. It's why Nicholas Peart's story resonated with us. Peart, who lives in Harlem, was one of the plaintiffs in New York City's big stop-and-frisk case.

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World Cafe
4:03 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Martha Wainwright On World Cafe

Martha Wainwright.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 4:30 pm

On this episode, Martha Wainwright joins us to talk about her late mother, Kate McGarrigle, and to sing us some of McGarrigle's songs.

McGarrigle, who died after a battle with cancer in January 2011, made a series of wonderful albums with her sister Anna during a career that spanned decades, beginning with their self-titled debut in 1975. The duo is probably best known for its cover of Linda Ronstadt's "Heart Like a Wheel."

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World Cafe
4:03 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Alice Russell On World Cafe

Alice Russell.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 4:30 pm

British soul singer Alice Russell has one of those voices that fills up a room. Over the course of five studio albums, she's been compared to Chaka Khan and the late Amy Winehouse, and performed with the likes of David Byrne and Fatboy Slim.

Her latest album is titled To Dust, which she celebrated in April by performing a sold-out show at World Cafe Live, the concert venue next door to the World Cafe studios. In this episode, we spotlight the best recordings from that concert and speak with Russell about what it's like to let loose on stage.

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Health Care
3:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Obama Delays Implementing Another Part Of Affordable Care Act

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 5:31 pm

The Obama administration has delayed implementation of another part of Affordable Care Act — this time, it's the rules aimed at limiting out-of-pocket costs for patients.

Law
3:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Brand New N.C. Voter ID Law Already Facing Challenges

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 5:31 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Voting rights advocates are focusing their sights on North Carolina. The ACLU and the NAACP filed lawsuits challenging the state's new voting rules just minutes after Governor Pat McCrory signed the bill into law yesterday.

Dave DeWitt of North Carolina Public Radio reports the new law does more than merely require voters to show an ID at the polls.

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Middle East
3:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Sinai Peninsula Sees Increasing Violence Since Morsi Takeover

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 7:22 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In 2011, when demonstrators took to the streets of Cairo in peaceful protest against then-President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians in the Sinai Peninsula staged attacks on police stations. And while Cairo is still the scene of political conflict, in the Sinai, the conflict remains extremely violent.

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Arts & Culture
1:44 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Why Are American Orchestras Afraid Of New Symphonies?

David Robertson, a passionate champion of new music, conducts the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra on tour in Berlin.
Dilip Vishwanat St. Louis Symphony

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 11:22 am

  • The American Symphony: Music And Ideas With David Robertson

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