Pages

World Cafe
2:30 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

World Cafe Next: Aisha Burns

Aisha Burns.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 4:53 pm

  • Hear Two New Songs By Aisha Burns

Aisha Burns is best known as the violinist in the chamber-folk band Balmorhea. But in the last few years, Burns has left her comfort zone to write her own songs and play them on guitar. On her debut album, Life in the Midwater, there's a delicate intimacy to her approach. Hear two songs from the new album, which is due out in September.

The Salt
2:27 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

How An Ethiopian Bean Became The Cinderella Of Coffee

Haleuya Habagaro says she always knew her coffee was exquisite. "When I roast the coffee, people come to ask where that strong fruity smell is coming from."
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 12:17 pm

As we reported during Coffee Week in April, coffee aficionados pay top dollar for single-origin roasts.

The professional prospectors working for specialty coffee companies will travel far and wide, Marco Polo-style, to discover that next champion bean.

Read more
Middle East
1:17 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

Morsi's Ouster In Egypt: A 'Bookend' For The Arab Spring

In Cairo on July 17, supporters of the ousted president demonstrate for his reinstatement.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

After covering the Egyptian revolution that overthrew President Hosni Mubarak in 2011, David Kirkpatrick has now been reporting on the military's ouster of Egypt's first democratically elected president, Mohammed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood.

Kirkpatrick, The New York Times' Cairo bureau chief, arrived in Egypt in January 2011, and days later flew to Tunisia to cover the revolution that launched the Arab Spring.

Read more
Author Interviews
12:58 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

The Gronkowskis On Raising A Family Of Champions

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. You know how in America we say we don't like dynasties, but then again, we actually kind of do. And we're certainly fascinated by them, and if you follow sports, in particular football, then you're probably fascinated by the Gronkowskis.

Read more
Around the Nation
12:58 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

Tell Me More Wants To Hear Your Dream

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we're going to return to the series we're bringing you all summer long. This August will mark the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s famous "I Have a Dream" speech. In recognition, we've been asking you for some of your dreams, big hopes, small wishes, visions you have for the future of the country or yourself.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVAL RECORDING)

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.: I have a dream...

Read more
World
12:58 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

Examining Jamaica's Homophobia

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, you might dream of just one of your kids making it as a pro athlete. Well, Gordie Gronkowski is batting four for four with another in the wings. We'll hear from Gordie and two of his sons in just a few minutes. First, though, we want to talk about an issue that's been in the headlines in this country. The issue of gay rights was front and center at the Supreme Court term that just ended. Legal advances were celebrated by LGBT activists everywhere.

Read more
Shots - Health News
9:29 am
Mon July 22, 2013

State Laws Limiting Abortion May Face Challenges On 20-Week Limit

Becca Besaw of Austin, Texas, and Christopher Robertson of Fort Worth, Texas, protest the state's new law restricting access to abortion at a rally in Dallas on July 15.
Tony Gutierrez AP

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 3:57 pm

Banning abortions after a specific point in pregnancy has been a popular trend in the states this year. Last week, GOP Gov. Rick Perry made Texas the 12th state to ban most abortions after 20 weeks.

But how states define the starting point for that 20 weeks may cause headaches for women and their doctors — and ultimately affect whether these laws pass constitutional muster.

Read more
Sports
5:44 am
Mon July 22, 2013

In The Tour De France, Even The Loser Is A Winner

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 6:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The winner of the Tour de France gets a yellow jersey but let's focus now on the lanterne rouge. That's the term for the guy who finishes last. It translates to red lantern, like that found on the caboose of a train. Yesterday, 36-year-old Canadian Svein Tuft took the honor with his 169th place finish. It turns out that the lanterne rouge is hotly contested. Just finishing brings glory and lucrative appearances. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

World
5:33 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Septuagenarian Superhero? Man Lifts Car Off Son-In-Law

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 6:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene with a tale of neither a bird nor a plane. Cecil Stuckless was fixing a Jeep in Salvage, Newfoundland with his son-in-law, who was working under the car. Stuckless told the CBC he was getting a tool when the car suddenly fell. He summoned all his strength and lifted the Jeep just enough to save his son-in-law. Impressive for anybody, let alone a 72-year-old.

Asked if he was Superman, Cecil said: No, I'm not super. I just did what I could.

NPR Story
4:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Encore: The Many Musical Careers Of Katie Crutchfield

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:04 am

Alabama-born singer-songwriter Katie Crutchfield broke through to a bigger audience last year by releasing an aching, bare-bones solo album. Her follow-up album came out in March. (This story originally aired on Weekend Edition Sunday on June 23, 2013.)

Read more

Pages