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5:48 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Ukraine Crisis Weighs Heavy On Other Foreign Policy Issues

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 9:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our next guest is Aaron David Miller, a longtime Middle East policy advisor at the State Department. He came to our studio this morning to weigh in on the consequences of the Ukraine crisis on two other major foreign policy issues: The Syrian Civil War and the Iran nuclear negotiations.

Good morning.

AARON DAVID MILLER: Morning.

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Europe
5:44 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Examining The Relationship Between Obama And Putin

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 9:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

On Independence Square in Kiev this morning, a 62-year-old Ukrainian, Igor Voscovonyanko(ph), was venting his frustration. Russia is effectively occupying part of his country, Crimea, and he's not convinced economic sanctions or anything else can stop Russia's president Vladimir Putin.

IGOR VOSCOVONYANKO: It is not enough. They are not enough because Putin's will is only occupation.

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Around the Nation
5:38 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Maryland Transportation Bill Held Up Over War Reparations

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 9:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Now to a story of how a long ago association with the crimes of Nazi Germany could stop a French company from doing business today in Maryland. A Maryland House committee heard testimony yesterday on a bill that would bar companies that played a role in the Holocaust from bidding on state contracts unless the companies pay reparations to victims.

State officials told the hearing that if that bill passes, it could jeopardize federal funding for a major light rail project. NPR's Allison Keyes explains.

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Science
4:28 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Trapping And Tracking The Mysterious Snowy Owl

Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 10:02 am

This is Hungerford, a large female snowy owl. Last summer she was just a hatchling — a gray ball of fuzz in the middle of the Arctic tundra. In the fall, newly equipped with adult plumage, she flew thousands of miles south until she reached the coast of Maryland. And this winter, she became an important part of an unprecedented research project.

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NPR Story
4:04 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Fla. Lawmakers Turn Deaf Ear Toward 'Stand Your Ground' Protesters

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 9:28 am

Inside Florida's Capitol, calls to change or repeal Stand Your Ground are having little impact.

On Tuesday, several hundred people in Tallahassee, Fla., gathered outside the Capitol building calling for changes in the law. The march and rally came a month after a jury in Jacksonville deadlocked on a murder charge in the case of Michael Dunn. Dunn is the software designer who shot and killed 17-year-old Jordan Davis in a dispute over loud music.

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NPR Story
4:04 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Dropcam Lets Owners Keep Tabs On Their Pets

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 9:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: Doggie Cam.

There has been a lot in the news lately about the Internet and privacy. And now it seems that even pets are under surveillance by owners.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

That's right. Thanks to a newly-improved smartphone app and device called the Dropcam, pet owners can check in on their furry friends while they're at work or out of town. Through the app, you can not only see your dog, but talk to them through a speaker as well.

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NPR Story
4:04 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Ice And Snow Forced Airlines To Cancel Thousands Of Flights

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 9:28 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

So far this winter, lots of snow and ice has forced major U.S. airlines to cancel more than 74,000 flights. At an aviation conference in New York yesterday, top executives of some of the nation's biggest airlines spoke about how those cancellations are affecting business.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

JIM ZARROLI, BYLINE: American Airlines said it cancelled 28,000 flights in January and February. Almost as many flights were grounded by United Continental. At Southwest 6,500 flights were cancelled.

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The Salt
4:50 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

What Pepsi Can Teach Us About Soft (Drink) Power In Russia

Pepsi was the first American consumer product to be manufactured and sold in the former Soviet Union. In 1991, Russians could buy the soda for 20 kopeks, about 10 cents.
Peter Dejong AP

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 8:09 pm

The United States has threatened economic sanctions against Moscow, but America is light on financial leverage in Russia: The country represents less than 1 percent of U.S. trade, and few major U.S. companies have significant investments there.

But one company with a long history in Russia is Pepsi.

So how did the American soft drink giant get its foot in the door to build a major market in Russia?

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The Two-Way
4:23 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Despite Diplomatic Tensions, U.S.-Russia Space Ties Persist

Russian personnel are the first to meet space station crew members when they return to earth.
Bill Ingalls NASA

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 6:40 am

Update 1:15 a.m. EDT Tuesday:

A Russian Soyuz capsule carrying a U.S.-Russian crew has landed safely in Kazakhstan, according to NASA. American Mike Hopkins and Russians Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy had spent 166 days in space. Russian space officials had considered delaying the landing because of heavy snowfall and strong winds but decided to go ahead with the original plan.

Original Post:

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All Tech Considered
4:23 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

SXSW: Software, Apps Still Rule But A Hardware Resurgence Is On

A set of littleBits comes with more than 40 different types of electronic pieces that connect with magnets.
NPR

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 6:59 pm

The task of building your very own toy, or robot, or radio can seem daunting for someone without much background in engineering. But a set of color-coded electronic bits that can be magnetically snapped together called littleBits is aiming to make creating your own electronics easy for everyone. It's like Legos, if only Legos could be connected into circuits that light up, move or make music.

"Circuits in seconds," promises the outside of the box.

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