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Around the Nation
6:06 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Boy Saved From Drowning By Woman Posing For Engagement Photo

Becki Salmon and her fiancé were posing on the banks of a fast-moving creek in a Philadelphia park. That is until a five-year-old boy started drowning right behind them, reports WPVI TV. Salmon, who's a trained lifeguard, jumped into the water and saved the boy.

Media
4:42 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Louisville TV Station Promises Not To Hype Breaking News

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In local television news, one of the most basic ways to appeal to viewers is the constant promise of breaking news. As NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik reports, one station in Louisville, Kentucky is taking a different approach and it's beginning to win attention for it.

DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BYLINE: The spot is for WDRB television in Louisville.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SPOT)

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Education
3:51 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Education Reform Movement Learns Lesson From Old Standards

Advocates for Common Core standards say it will be harder for states to hide their failing schools.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 9:08 am

Common Core — the new set of national education standards in math and English language arts — will take effect in most states next year. This move toward a single set of standards has been embraced by a bipartisan crowd of politicians and educators largely because of what the Common Core standards are replacing: a mess.

In years past, the education landscape was a discord of state standards. A fourth grader in Arkansas could have appeared proficient in reading by his state's standards — but, by the standards of another state, say Massachusetts, not even close.

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Movie Interviews
3:51 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Oscar Winners Rash And Faxon Team Up Again For 'The Way, Way Back'

Duncan's summer is filled with awkward — and often adult-initiated — situations involving the girl next door (Annasophia Robb).
Claire Folger Fox Searchlight

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 5:13 pm

The coming-of-age story is a summer-movie staple — as writers Nat Faxon and Jim Rash, who struck Oscar gold with The Descendants in 2011, can attest.

Their latest film, The Way, Way Back, is another entry in the canon; it's the tale of an awkward teenager, Duncan, who's floundering through a seaside vacation when he's taken under the wing of Owen, the sweetly demented manager of a summer water park. Comedy ensues — and in passing, Duncan learns some important lessons about adulthood.

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National Security
2:37 am
Fri July 5, 2013

NSA's Reach Leads To Calls For Updated Eavesdropping Laws

National Security Agency headquarters at Fort Meade, Md.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 9:18 am

The continuing leak of classified information by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden has renewed a debate about the U.S. government's power to reach secretly into the personal lives of its citizens.

But there is at least one point on which both privacy advocates and security experts agree: The laws governing electronic eavesdropping have not kept pace with technology.

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Law
2:35 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Whose Term Was It? A Look Back At The Supreme Court

Chief Justice John G. Roberts (left) and Associate Justice Anthony M. Kennedy.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:03 pm

It would not be an exaggeration to call the recently completed Supreme Court term a lollapalooza. Day-by-day on the last week of the court term, the justices handed down one legal thunderbolt after another: same-sex marriage, voting rights, affirmative action. The end-of-term crush of opinions made so many headlines that other important decisions got little public notice.

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Europe
2:34 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Are Things Too Cozy In London's 'City' Within A City?

Skyscrapers in the City of London, the heart of the financial district, are reshaping the skyline.
Dan Bobkoff NPR

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 1:33 pm

For at least a millennium, the heart of Britain's commercial and financial industries has been the City of London.

The City is not the large metropolis we know as London. It's much older and smaller. Many call it the Square Mile, though it's not square and a bit bigger than a mile. It's the home to big banks, medieval alleyways and St. Paul's Cathedral. And, for all those centuries, the area has had the same local government with an unusual name: The City of London Corporation.

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StoryCorps
12:39 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Two Brothers Remember Lives Spent With Liberty

The Bizzaro brothers — James, 81 (left) and Paul, 82 — spent their childhoods living in a house right behind the Statue of Liberty.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 3:51 am

Brothers Paul and James Bizzaro, both in their 80s, spent their childhoods living in a house right behind the Statue of Liberty. Their family moved to the same small island in New York Harbor as Lady Liberty 75 years ago this summer, not long after their father, also James, became a guard at the statue.

When the Bizzaros moved to what's now called Liberty Island in 1937, Paul was 8 and James was 6.

"Half of the island was for the visitors. The half that we lived in, we had that whole half to us," says James.

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Planet Money
9:03 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Why Doesn't Everybody Buy Cheap, Generic Headache Medicine?

Same pills. Lower price.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 8:03 pm

Why does anyone buy Bayer aspirin — or Tylenol, or Advil — when, almost always, there's a bottle of cheaper generic pills, with the same active ingredient, sitting right next to the brand-name pills?

Matthew Gentzkow, an economist at the University of Chicago's Booth school, recently tried to answer this question. Along with a few colleagues, Gentzkow set out to test a hypothesis: Maybe people buy the brand-name pills because they just don't know that the generic version is basically the same thing.

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Around the Nation
3:43 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

New Housing Project In Philadelphia Aims To Attract Teachers

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 8:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

Time spent among people who do the same kind of work can boost morale, sharpen creativity, just go to a conference or a retreat. So some people involved in education thought how about giving teachers a place where are a lot of them can live under one roof. They're trying that in Philadelphia.

Here's Elizabeth Fiedler of member station WHYY.

(SOUNDBITE OF MACHINERY)

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