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Movie Reviews
3:41 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Branagh Imagines Mozart's 'Magic Flute' In Wartime

Pamina (Amy Carson) and Tamino (Joseph Kaiser) in Kenneth Branagh's production of Mozart's The Magic Flute.
Revolver Group

Mozart's The Magic Flute, the last opera he lived to complete, has some of his most sublime and sublimely comic music. Technically, it's more of a musical comedy, what in German is called a Singspiel, a play with songs and spoken dialogue. I was excited to learn that it was filmed by Kenneth Branagh, whose Shakespeare movies I really admire. Mozart's mixture of fairy tale and high morality presents a great opportunity for a filmmaker; in 1975, Ingmar Bergman released a version for Swedish television that has become a beloved classic.

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The Salt
2:10 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The Famous St. Paul Sandwich (of St. Louis)

This exists.
NPR

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 11:28 am

Since Sandwich Monday began, certain sandwiches have been our white whales: the Hippogriff Burger, a Reuben signed by J.D. Salinger, an Actual White Whale sandwich. Also, the mysterious St.Paul sandwich, native to St. Louis: It's an egg foo young patty, with lettuce, pickle and mayo, on white bread. But we finally caught one.

Miles: This is the same sandwich my Model U.N. group made the first time we all got high together.

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Author Interviews
1:34 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

From Kids' Books To Erotica, Tomi Ungerer's 'Far Out' Life

Tomi Ungerer's 1967 book Moon Man follows its lonely protagonist as he visits Earth for the very first time.
Tomi Ungerer

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 3:00 pm

Children's-book writer Maurice Sendak learned a lot from author and artist Tomi Ungerer. In Far Out Isn't Far Enough, a new documentary about Ungerer, Sendak says, "I learned to be braver than I was. I think that's why [Where The Wild Things Are] was partly Tomi — his energy, his spirit.

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It's All Politics
1:29 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

How To Turn A Red State Blue: California Edition

Republicans celebrated when California Gov. Pete Wilson was re-elected in 1994. But his divisive campaign led to a backlash, especially among the growing Latino population in the state.
Kevork Djansezian AP

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 5:11 pm

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

Democrats who hope to turn Texas from red to blue are looking to California for inspiration.

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Education
11:20 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Hear the #NPRAspen Education Chat

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 12:45 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We are also hearing your thoughts about education on Twitter at #NPRAspen. I just want to read one more of the tweets that we got, it says treat teacher time and energy as valuable, finite resources, design schools to use them efficiently. That comes from Roxanna Eldin (ph) in Miami. Please stay with us as we continue our special broadcast from the Aspen Ideas Festival, we're broadcasting from the Hotel Jerome. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Barbershop
9:59 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Can America Learn From Foreign School Systems?

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 12:45 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for a visit to the barbershop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds. We're here in Aspen for the Aspen Ideas Festival, and we couldn't get into the shop, so we brought the shop to us.

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Education
9:59 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Is America Still The 'Land Of Opportunity?'

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 12:45 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
6:19 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Study: Americans Want To Be Informed About News Stories

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne, with news about the news. A new study finds 50 percent of Americans would rather know more about current events than fashion, sports or celebrity. So much so that one in three admitted pretending to know about a news story to impress someone. And, knowledgeable or not, 70 percent said they'll find any opportunity to argue about the news regardless of topic, though the favorite choice is politics.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

World
6:19 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Jennifer Lopez Sorry For Appearance In Turkmenistan

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Jennifer Lopez says she's sorry for singing "Happy Birthday" to the president of Turkmenistan. The country's known for being repressive. Human rights groups say government critics can be tortured or thrown in jail. A publicist says Lopez didn't know any of that when she put on a traditional Turkmen dress to serenade the president. At one point, Lopez's choreographer tweeted: I wonder where all my Turkmenistan followers are. Guess he didn't realize that Twitter is banned in the country.

Education
5:03 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Tell Me More: Education Special And Twitter Chat

Use #NPRAspen to share your ideas about improving education and learning.
NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 4:06 pm

  • Listen: July 1 Education Special
  • Listen: July 2 Education Special

Education has been a critical topic for Michel Martin at NPR's Tell Me More, and we are eager to again tackle the topic of learning and education.

On Monday and Tuesday, July 1 and July 2, Tell Me More will host a live radio broadcast and Twitter chat from the Aspen Ideas Festival in Aspen, Colo., focusing on education and, even more broadly, on learning.

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