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Author Interviews
4:31 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Former BP CEO: 'Glass Closet' Still Holds Many Gay Workers Back

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 7:30 pm

"It was time to leave the building."

So begins a new book by John Browne, former CEO of the energy giant BP. But that sentence could easily have read: "It was time to leave the closet."

During his 12 years as CEO, he never discussed his sexuality in the workplace. That changed in 2007, when his relationship with a male escort was exposed and Browne resigned amid an ensuing scandal. At the time, he said in a statement, "I have always regarded my sexuality as a personal matter, to be kept private."

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Poetry
4:29 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

New Poet Laureate: 'The Meaning Has Always Stayed The Same'

Charles Wright, a retired professor at the University of Virginia, has been named the nation's next poet laureate.
Holly Wright Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 6:43 pm

The Library of Congress announced Thursday that the nation's next poet laureate will be Charles Wright, a retired professor at the University of Virginia.

"I'm very honored and flattered to be picked, but also somewhat confused," the poet told The New York Times. "I really don't know what I'm supposed to do. But as soon as I find out, I'll do it."

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Politics
3:07 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Hillary Clinton: The Fresh Air Interview

Hillary Clinton's new memoir, Hard Choices, outlines her four years as secretary of state under President Obama. She talks about her vote for the Iraq War, women's rights and political "gamers."
Patrick Smith Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 11:40 am

Hillary Clinton is on a national book tour for her new memoir, Hard Choices. The book outlines her four years as secretary of state during President Obama's first term, when she met with leaders all over the world.

One of her priorities was to campaign for gay rights and women's rights. She says she saw the "full gamut" on how women were treated, and in some cases it was "painful to observe."

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Europe
3:02 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Are 'Color Revolutions' A New Front In U.S.-Russia Tensions?

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 6:43 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

U.S. relations with Russia are at their lowest point since the Cold War thanks to the crisis in Ukraine. Russian defense officials are talking about a new doctrine of subversive warfare between major world powers. They accuse the West of using popular uprisings to topple unfriendly governments. And some analysts say Moscow itself is employing that strategy in eastern Ukraine. More from NPR's Corey Flintoff.

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Iraq
3:02 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

As Militants Sweep South Across Iraq, A View From The North

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 10:22 pm

A shift in power is underway in Iraq, where the jihadi group ISIS has captured several cities in a recent offensive. Jane Arraf is a reporter for Al Jazeera America, and she comments on the violence.

Latin America
3:02 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Brazilians Greet The World Cup Kickoff With Protests And Tear Gas

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 6:43 pm

In Brazil, thousands of protesters clashed with police just hours before the World Cup opening ceremony. The streets of Sao Paolo were filled with tear gas and concussion grenades.

NPR Story
1:42 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Debut Novel Asks: What's A Little Fakery For Family?

Boris Fishman is author of "A Replacement Life." (Rob Liguori)

In Boris Fishman‘s debut novel “A Replacement Life,” Slava is an immigrant from the former Soviet Union who wants to make it as a writer at a prestigious magazine. In order to do so, he moves to Manhattan and minimizes contact with his family in Brooklyn.

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NPR Story
1:42 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Charles Wright Named 20th U.S. Poet Laureate

Charles Wright, pictured here in 2006, has been named the 20th U.S. Poet Laureate. (Library of Congress)

The Library of Congress has chosen Southern writer Charles Wright to serve as the nation’s next poet laureate beginning this fall.

Wright hails from Pickwick Dam, Tennessee. For years, he was a professor at the University of Virginia.

He began writing poetry while he was stationed in Italy with the U.S. Army, inspired by the work of Ezra Pound.

In announcing the selection, Librarian of Congress James Billington says Wright is a master of the “meditative, image-driven lyric.”

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NPR Story
1:42 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Does Lockdown Training Save Lives?

Students receive training for barricading a classroom door in the event of a shooter entering their school as part of the ALICE program. (ALICE Training Institute)

New details are emerging today about the school shooting at Reynolds High School in Troutdale, Oregon, earlier this week.

Officials have identified the shooter as freshman student Jared Michael Padgett, and say he was armed with an AR-15 rifle and carrying nine loaded magazines, which could have shot off several hundred rounds. The gun and ammunition belonged to the boy’s family. Padget killed fellow freshman Emilio Hoffman and wounded a teacher.

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Education
11:52 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Who Runs The World? Rutgers Says Beyonce

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 1:31 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So it's summer, or close enough. A lot of college campuses are open for business. In most classrooms, if a student walked in playing Beyonce loud enough for everybody to hear, most professors would probably ask him or her to turn it off, but in Professor Kevin Allred's class that student might be asked to turn it up.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "RUN THE WORLD (GIRLS)")

BEYONCE KNOWLES: (Singing) My persuasion can build a nation. Endless power, the love we can devour. You'll do anything for me. Who run the world? Girls.

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