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Parallels
7:50 am
Mon June 9, 2014

Escaping South Sudan's Violence Often Means Going Hungry

Women carry sticks in Ganyliel, South Sudan, an area protected from the violence in the country due to its isolation. But food there is scarce.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 9:00 am

Even in an undeveloped country like South Sudan, Ganyliel can feel like the middle of nowhere: a bunch of tiny islands surrounded by a gigantic swampy floodplain fed by the River Nile during rainy season. To get here, I took a helicopter from the capital, then ditched my sneakers for gumboots. I've waded out into water that's too deep for an SUV and too shallow for a speedboat.

I board a canoe made from a hollowed-out palm tree.

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Around the Nation
7:14 am
Mon June 9, 2014

After Shootings, Extended Silence: What The Border Patrol Hasn't Said

Maria Guadelupe Guereca Betancourt, a resident of Juarez, Mexico, lost her son Sergio, 15, when he was shot under the black bridge that spans the border from El Paso, Texas, to Juarez.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 10:42 pm

The U.S. Border Patrol is becoming more transparent, according to the commissioner who oversees it.

Still, there is much the agency has yet to disclose.

The agency has repeatedly used deadly force along the U.S.-Mexico border while providing little or no information about what happened or why. What follows are the stories of four notable killings that have raised unanswered questions between 2010 and 2014.

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Sports
7:14 am
Mon June 9, 2014

U.S. Men's Soccer Team Braces For World Cup Challenges

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 12:07 pm

The World Cup begins Thursday in Brazil. The U.S. team has its first match against Ghana the following week, the start of the so called "group of death."

Asia
4:09 am
Mon June 9, 2014

Taliban Claim Responsibility For Karachi Airport Attack

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 8:32 am

Gunmen attacked Pakistan's international airport in Karachi Sunday night. At least 23 people are dead, including airport guards and the 10 militants said to be behind the attack.

Sports
5:54 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

Baseball Has An Elbow Problem: More Pros Getting Ligament Surgery

After this pitch on May 27, Los Angeles Angels pitcher Sean Burnett left the game with a torn elbow ligament. Friday, he became the latest pro to undergo "Tommy John" surgery.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 2:13 pm

On Friday, Los Angeles Angels pitcher Sean Burnett became the latest player this season to undergo "Tommy John" surgery. In this weekend's MLB draft, at least four players selected had already had the infamous elbow surgery as amateurs.

The operation is named after the first player to undergo the procedure to fix an injured elbow ligament, in 1974. Pitchers are particularly vulnerable to this injury.

The procedure involves taking a tendon from somewhere else in the body — or from a cadaver — and grafting it into place. Pitchers get it most often.

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Around the Nation
5:43 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

When A Parent Goes To Prison, A Child Also Pays A Price

Ifetayo Harvey's father went to prison when she was 4 years old and released when she was 12. Now 22, she says the experience helped her empathize with others and understand people from a different perspective.
Courtesy of Ifetayo Harvey

When she was a child, 22-year-old Ifetayo Harvey's father was sentenced to prison for cocaine trafficking.

"My dad went to prison when I was 4 years old, and he was released when I was 12," Harvey says.

Harvey is one of millions of young people who grew up with a parent in prison. A recent study from the National Academy of Sciences examined the growth of incarceration in the United States, and among the topics was the effect on kids and families when a parent goes to prison.

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NPR Story
5:42 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

Scientist Touts Exoskeleton That Could Offer A Chance To Walk Again

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 12:20 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

This Thursday, the eyes of the world will be on Brazil during the World Cup's opening ceremony. And there'll be a remarkable moment during that event. From São Paulo, NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports.

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U.S.
5:42 pm
Sun June 8, 2014

Was There Incentive At VA For Behavior That Created Scandal?

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath. It's time to fix the Department of Veterans Affairs. That's the consensus in Washington, where a bipartisan bill to do just that is expected to hit the floor this week. At least 18 veterans died while waiting for doctors appointments at a VA hospital in Arizona. While we still don't know if they died because of the wait, acting VA Secretary, Sloan Gibson, says the VA has failed America's veterans.

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Politics
11:02 am
Sat June 7, 2014

Move Over, Bridgegate: Chris Christie's Next Campaign Roadblock

As New Jersey's fiscal outlook worsens, Gov. Chris Christie is fighting to ensure that a traffic scandal is the worst of his political problems as he eyes a 2016 presidential campaign.
AP

The U.S. economy reached a milestone this week: The country finally recovered all the jobs it lost during the Great Recession. But some states still lag behind when it comes to job creation — including New Jersey.

The Garden State's stalled economy may be an even bigger problem for Gov. Chris Christie than the scandal over lane closures at the George Washington Bridge.

When Christie took office in 2010, the state had just lost more than 100,000 jobs. Christie was undaunted. He talked about the "Jersey Comeback" at town hall meetings, on TV and at ground-breaking events.

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Author Interviews
10:37 am
Sat June 7, 2014

Swallowed By The Times And The Fate Of 'Great Powers'

Originally published on Sat June 7, 2014 11:41 am

Tom Rachman has written a book for book lovers in The Rise and Fall of Great Powers. The best-selling novelist talks with NPR's Scott Simon about the difference between reading and literature.

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