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Science
2:15 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Alzheimer's 'Epidemic' Now A Deadlier Threat To Elderly

Social worker Nuria Casulleres shows a portrait of Audrey Hepburn to elderly men during a memory activity at the Cuidem La Memoria elderly home in Barcelona, Spain, last August. The home specializes in Alzheimer's patients.
David Ramos Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 6:44 am

Alzheimer's disease doesn't just steal memories. It takes lives.

The disease is now the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S., and figures released Tuesday by the Alzheimer's Association show that deaths from the disease increased by 68 percent between 2000 and 2010.

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The Salt
2:14 am
Tue March 19, 2013

'Drunken Botanist' Takes A Garden Tour Of The Liquor Cabinet

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 8:43 am

The next time you're sipping on a glass of something boozy, consider the plants behind your beverage. Some of them might spring immediately to mind: grapes in your wineglass, rye in your whiskey bottle, juniper in your gin and tonic. But what about sorghum and coriander? Cinchona and bitter orange?

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U.S.
5:02 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Among Thousands Of Gun Deaths, Only One Charles Foster Jr.

Led by the Rev. Willie Phillips (center), protesters march in February against violence in and around Club Majestic.
Mike Haskey Courtesy of The Ledger Enquirer

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 8:45 pm

The Morris Missionary Baptist Church is nestled down a red dirt road, in Morris, Ga., set among pine trees near the Alabama state line. Next to the small white church lies its most recent grave site: that of Charles Foster Jr.

While the mass killings in Newtown, Conn., and Aurora, Colo., garnered a frenzy of news coverage, statistically, they are not the norm. Each year, thousands of gun homicides in the U.S. — 11,000 in 2010 alone — attract little or no media attention.

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Author Interviews
4:54 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

'FDR And The Jews' Puts A President's Compromises In Context

President Franklin D. Roosevelt meets with the National Jewish Welfare Board — (left to right) Walter Rothschild, Chaplain Aryeh Lev, Barnett Brickner and Louis Kraft — at the White House on Nov. 8, 1943.
George R. Skadding AP

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 8:17 am

The subject of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's relationship with the Jewish community is complicated, multidimensional and contentious. On the one hand, the former New York governor won Jewish votes by landslide margins and led the Allies to victory in World War II, defeating Nazi Germany. Some of his closest advisers and strongest supporters were Jews, including Felix Frankfurter, whom he named to the Supreme Court, speechwriter Samuel Rosenman and Treasury Secretary Henry Morgenthau.

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Law
4:02 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Supreme Court Tests Limits Of Voter Registration Law

Arizona Attorney General Thomas Horne talks with reporters outside the U.S. Supreme Court after oral arguments in the case challenging Arizona's voter registration law on Monday.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 5:57 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Monday in a case that seeks to redefine a federal law aimed at streamlining the nation's voter registration process.

Congress enacted the law 20 years ago after it found that 40 percent of eligible voters were not registered to vote. Under the 1993 National Voter Registration Act, people can register by mail to vote in federal elections using a standard federal form. The form, among other things, asks prospective voters whether they are U.S. citizens and requires them to sign to the statement, under penalty of perjury.

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Agriculture
3:48 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Local Food May Feel Good, But It Doesn't Pay

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 4:54 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

These days, farmers markets are springing up all over the place, from small towns to big cities. Locally grown food is booming, as shoppers invest more time, money and thought into what they eat. But not all is well in the local food movement.

As St. Louis Public Radio's Adam Allington reports, many of the farmers who supply local markets are barely getting by.

ADAM ALLINGTON, BYLINE: It's a chilly March morning in Elsah, Illinois, near the banks of the Mississippi. But inside Amy Cloud's greenhouse it's toasty warm.

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From Our Listeners
3:43 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Vintage Sounds: The Whirs And Clicks Of Film Cameras

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 4:54 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Last week in All Tech Considered, we invited listeners to share stories of sounds from older technology you miss. This invitation was prompted by a story about some young people who choose to shoot pictures on actual film, a kind of digital counter-revolution.

We asked you to send in samples of audio from older technology that's been overtaken by all the new devices we now use.

(SOUNDBITE OF A RECORD PLAYER NEEDLE)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: A phonograph needle dropping onto a record is like a drum roll.

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Latin America
2:20 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Three Decades On, Ex-Guatemalan Leader Faces Genocide Charges

Guatemala's former dictator Efrain Rios Montt arrives in court Jan. 31 in Guatemala City to stand trial on genocide charges. On Tuesday, the prosecution will present its case in the trial.
Moises Castillo AP

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 8:44 pm

In a Guatemalan courtroom Tuesday, prosecutors will present their case against a former military dictator who ruled during one of the bloodiest periods in the Central American nation's 36-year civil war.

Efrain Rios Montt is accused of genocide in the murder of tens of thousands of Guatemala's Indians. Human rights advocates and the families of victims have struggled for years to bring him before the court, and they say it is the first trial in Latin America of a former president in the country where he ruled.

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The Two-Way
2:00 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Stalker Who Inspired 'The Natural' Dies; Lived Real Life In Obscurity

Ruth Ann Steinhagen, then-19, in the Cook County Jail after she shot Philadelphia Phillies first baseman Eddie Waitkus in 1949. On the table: a photo of Waitkus taken in the hospital where he was recovering from his bullet wound. The story of his shooting was the inspiration for Bernard Malamud's novel The Natural. Steinhagen died this past December.
AP

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 4:54 pm

  • NPR's Robert Siegel and Bob Goldsborough of the Chicago Tribune: What happened to Ruth Ann Steinhagen?
  • Bob Goldsborough on Ruth Ann Steinhagen's quiet life

Though we've seen The Natural many times, we have to confess we didn't know that a real woman shot a real baseball player in 1949 and that their story inspired Bernard Malamud's 1952 book and Robert Redford's 1984 movie.

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NPR Story
1:04 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

As Consumers Jump Ship, News Outlets Shift Priorities

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 1:44 pm

Americans are abandoning their long-trusted news outlets in high numbers. According to a Pew Research Center report, 31 percent of Americans say they have deserted a particular news outlet because it no longer provides the information they want.

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