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NPR Story
2:28 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Pennsylvania Becomes Latest Gay Marriage State

Peg Welch, center left, and her wife Delma Welch gather with others at a gay marriage rally on the steps of the state Capitol Tuesday, May 20, 2014, in Harrisburg, Pa. Pennsylvania's ban on gay marriage was overturned Tuesday by a federal judge in a decision that makes same-sex marriage legal throughout the Northeast. (Matt Rourke/AP)

Pennsylvania’s Republican Governor Tom Corbett says he won’t appeal yesterday’s ruling from a federal judge striking down a state law that banned gay marriage.

Hundreds of gay couples are rushing to get married in the state, which as of today has become the 19th state where gay marriage is legal.

On Monday, a federal judge in Oregon struck down a voter-approved ban on gay marriage and a federal judge in Utah ordered state officials to recognize more than 1,000 gay marriages performed there in the two weeks before the U.S. Supreme Court issued an emergency stay.

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NPR Story
2:13 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Natasha Trethewey Ends Her Tenure As U.S. Poet Laureate

As her tenure as U.S. Poet Laureate comes to an end, Natasha Trethewey reflects on her work and poetry in our country today. (W.T. Pfefferle/Flickr)

The role of the United States Poet Laureate is to raise the country’s consciousness about poetry and to spark passion for the craft.

At the conclusion of her two-year tenure as the 19th U.S. Poet Laureate, Pulitzer Prize winner Natasha Trethewey has done that and more.

As her term comes to an end, she joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to reflect on her work, her unique past and the state of poetry today.

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NPR Story
2:13 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Fare-Dodging Movement Strengthens In Sweden

A fare dodger is pictured in this 2011 photo on Planka.nu's Flickr. (Planka.nu/Flickr)

They’re the nemesis of public transportation agencies across the world: fare dodgers. But a growing number say they’re not bandits, rather participants in an important social movement.

Case in point: a group in Stockholm, Sweden, that wants fares to be abolished altogether and transport to be 100 percent tax-funded (it’s currently 50 percent tax-funded).

Alex Berthelsen is a longtime member of that organization, called Planka.nu (roughly translated to “Free-Ride.Now”).

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Politics
11:12 am
Wed May 21, 2014

In Primary Races, Republicans Fight Back Tea Party

Six states held primaries on Tuesday, and the results were good for the GOP establishment. Host Michel Martin learns more about the results from NPR Politics Editor Charles Mahtesian.

Pop Culture
11:12 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Does It 'Suck To Be A Fat Girl'?

A recent episode of FX show Louie raised some controversial questions about women, weight and body image. Did the episode miss the mark? Our panel of writers and bloggers weigh in.

Asia
11:12 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Are India's Elections A Wake Up Call For The Diaspora?

An overwhelming win for India's conservative opposition party could profoundly change the direction of the world's largest democracy. But what do Indian Americans think?

Politics
8:58 am
Wed May 21, 2014

In Kentucky Primary, McConnell Bests Tea Party Challenger

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 9:20 am

In a day packed full of primaries, voters headed to the polls in six states — including three that are expected to have highly competitive Senate races.

Around the Nation
6:28 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Rise In Cyber Crime Challenges FBI

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 7:06 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The rise of cyber crime is posing a new challenge for the FBI. To fight sophisticated cyber criminals, it's hiring hundreds of hackers. But the FBI has a rule against hiring anyone who's smoked marijuana recently. Director James Comey outlined his dilemma at a convention on crime. He went to the best but, quote, some of those kids want to smoke weed on the way to the interview. Bottom line, the agency is rethinking its pot policy. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:28 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Pleasant Hills, Calf., Is Looking For A New City Clerk

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 7:06 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Politics does not agree with Kim Lehmkuhl. She was city clerk in Pleasant Hill, California. Instead of taking notes during city council meetings, she posted on Twitter. Now the clerk has quit. In an email announcing her resignation, she said the job was atrocious, incredibly depressing. She wished the city well in finding someone else to write down the politicians every, quote, "misogynistic joke, tin foil hat conspiracy theory and pathetic pandering." Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:28 am
Wed May 21, 2014

What Does It Take To Surf Lake Tahoe In The Sierra Nevada?

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 7:06 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Skiing is one thing a visitor can do on the slopes surrounding Lake Tahoe here in California. Some locals are venturing into its frigid waters for another sport: Surfing.

Here's Will Stone of Reno Public Radio.

(SOUNDBITE OF A VEHICLE)

MARK NORRIS: OK, we're almost ready.

WILL STONE, BYLINE: All morning Mark Norris has been checking the weather several thousand feet above at Lake Tahoe -not for the snow, but for the wind.

NORRIS: It's got to be at least 70 miles per hour off the ridgeline.

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