Abigail Censky | St. Louis Public Radio

Abigail Censky

News intern
Lane closures on the Poplar Street Bridge began this week doubling commute times. One westbound lane will reopen in early October.
Credit Flickr| Paul Sableman

Two westbound lane closures on the Poplar Street Bridge have caused a headache for Illinois and Missouri commuters this week, doubling commute times for some.

The closures come on top of the full shutdown of MLK Bridge at the end of August, compounding traffic congestion. The lanes on the Poplar Street Bridge will remain closed through early October while the Missouri Department of Transportation replaces a joint in a bridge.

Maplewood on June 7, 2017
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The City of Maplewood may soon overhaul a controversial public-nuisance law that has been challenged by two recent lawsuits.

Maplewood’s City Council introduced an ordinance Tuesday that would add protections keeping victims of crimes from eviction and exclude calls to police from counting as a nuisance against residents.

Rex and Jeanne Sinquefield donated $50 million to Saint Louis University to improve the school's standing as a top tier research institution. The gift is the largest in the university's 200-year history.
Steve Dolan | Saint Louis University

Local philanthropists Rex and Jeanne Sinquefield are donating $50 million to Saint Louis University to help bolster the school’s research efforts.

The gift announced Tuesday is the largest in the school’s 200-year history.

Tory Knight takes inventory at The Lost Whiskey in June. Part of the new proposal includes raising the amount of an establishment's revenue that must come from food sales to 60 percent.
Chad Davis | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Charles City Council plans to introduce an ordinance next week aimed at taming North Main Street’s late night revelers. The new plan comes after an initial proposal of an early ‘last call’ ignited an uproar from area bar owners and failed to advance.

Dave Beckering, a council member and backer of both proposed ordinances, said disturbances from people exiting bars and nightclubs on North Main Street have spun out of control in the last two years, creating late-night traffic that police can’t handle.

David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

The fate of Hanley Hills will be decided Tuesday when residents vote to remain independent or become an unincorporated part of St. Louis County.

The measure was placed on the ballot after a former trustee, Thomas Rusan, collected hundreds of residents’ signatures this spring. The village, with 20 streets and about 2,100 residents, is sandwiched between Vinita Park and Pagedale.

David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Three Republicans are trying to take back Missouri’s 97th House District after Democrat Mike Revis flipped it in a February special election.

The district, which straddles St. Louis and Jefferson counties, has voted consistently Republican for state representative for the past 20 years. When Revis won by just over 100 votes, the upset garnered national attention, spurring talk about the possibility of a blue wave in the coming midterms.

David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

The three Democrats running to replace Rep. Michael Butler all agree crime is the top issue for the north St. Louis district but differ on how to make it safer.

LaKeySha Bosley, part of the Bosley family political dynasty, said she plans to increase funding for local educational opportunities and reduce the number of vacant properties in the district — which includes Midtown, JeffVanderLou and Compton Heights — to reduce crime.

Floyd Blackwell, Lee Smith and Raychel Proudie face each other in an Aug. 7 Democratic primary for Missouri House District 73.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Three Democrats in north St. Louis County are seeking to take embattled state representative Courtney Curtis’ seat in Missouri’s 73rd district.

Curtis has served in the Missouri House since 2012 and was eligible to run for a final term. However, he chose not to file for the state representative race because he intended to run for state Senate.

Those plans changed when Curtis was fined $114,000 for violating state-campaign finance laws. The Missouri Democratic Party blocked his attempt to file because he hadn’t paid the fines.

David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Two Democrats running for the south St. Louis House seat being vacated by Fred Wessels say the most important issues to address are improving public safety and educational opportunities.

Steve Butz and Travis Estes have similar platforms in the Aug. 7 race for the 81st District, which includes the Holly Hills, Mount Pleasant, Marine Villa, Dutchtown and Carondelet neighborhoods.

Democrats Brad Bakker, at left, and Wiley Price IV, right, seek to replace Missouri House Rep. Karla May in District 84.
Jon Saucier Photography, Wiley Price IV via Facebook

In Missouri’s 84th House district two Democrats are competing for Karla May’s term-limited seat as she makes a bid for the state Senate.

Brad Bakker, an attorney, came to St. Louis to attend Saint Louis University; he left to get his law degree before returning to St. Louis with his family several years ago. Wiley Price IV, an events management director, is a lifelong resident of the 84th district, which includes the Forest Park, the Central West End, Dogtown, Wellls-Goodfellow and Hamilton Heights neigborhoods.

Ganga Mongar, left, and Sancha Subba, right, receive help from Mongar's daughter Anjali while practicing for the writing portion of the naturalization test. Both women have learned how to read and write to prepare for the test.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Ganga Mongar’s pencil is covered in hearts and a pink eraser cap. She taps it on the table as she reels off the names of the Supreme Court justices. She’s is in her mid-40s, a mother of five, and a student at the St. Louis International Institute, where she’s enrolled in the Literacy Citizenship Preparation course. She comes three times a week for two hours, where, in addition to being drilled on U.S. civics, she’s learning how to read and write in English.

Construction began Tuesday July 10 for the Live! by Loews' Ballpark Village hotel. The hotel showed in a rendering here could be completed by February 2020.
Cordish Companies and Loews Hotels & Co

Officials plunged ceremonial shovels into the dirt at the future site of Live! by Loews at Ballpark Village on Monday.

The $65 million hotel, at the corner of Clark and 8th streets, is part of the $260-million, second phase of the development. The hotel is a part of the living space that Cardinals President Bill DeWitt III said will put the “village” in Ballpark Village.

A child runs through the reflecting pool at the Gateway Arch. The new museum and upgraded grounds were christened Tuesday, July 3, 2018, after a five-year renovation project.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

The Normandy High School Band provided the beat and Mother Nature brought on the heat, as hundreds gathered on the St. Louis riverfront Tuesday morning to celebrate the opening of the new museum and visitors center at the Gateway Arch.

The ribbon cutting marked the final stage in a five-year project to revitalize the Arch grounds. Speakers emphasized the public-private partnership that planned and funded the $380 million project.

close up of nail heads
Flickr | Ed Ivanushkin

Mid Continent Steel and Wire, a nail manufacturer in Poplar Bluff, Missouri, has been at the center of a media blitz after its plight was publicized by Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., in front of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross at a Senate committee hearing last week.

Since the hearing, Mid Continent, alongside household names like Harley-Davidson, Inc., has been declared a likely casualty of the Trump administration’s protectionist trade policies — specifically steel tariffs.

The company, which manufactures 50 percent of the nails made in the United States, laid off 60 of its 500 employees and shuttered a production plant last week.

Democrats hope that Gov. Eric Greitens will be an albatross for GOP state legislative candidates.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Gov. Eric Grietens' shocking resignation on Tuesday elicited an array of emotions from Missourians following nearly five months of political and legal scandal.

Lt. Gov. Mike Parson will be sworn in as Missouri’s new governor Friday at 5 p.m. This comes after accusations against Greitens of sexual misconduct related to a 2015 extramarital affair, and alleged campaign finance violations involving donor lists tied to Greitens’ nonprofit The Mission Continues.