Adam Allington


Adam grew up on a cherry farm in northern Michigan.  He holds a BA in economics from Kalamazoo College.  Adam's radio career began in 2003 at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, Maine. He went on to cut his teeth filing stories for Maine Public Radio. Before coming to St. Louis Public Radio in 2006, Adam was was an international journalism fellow at Deutsche Welle in Bonn, Germany.  He has regularly filed features for various shows and networks including NPR, PRI, Marketplace and the BBC. He received a  Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellowship for the 2011-2012 academic year.

Ways to Connect

Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

If you are a fan of wine, particularly European wines, from France, Italy or Germany, you can be proud of the role Missouri plays in creating that wine.

Ever since the mid-1800s roots from Missouri grapes have been grafted on to European varieties, because of their natural resistance to certain pests.

Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay is asking the business community to step up to help fight crime in the city.

Slay says finding jobs for at-risk teens is the best way to keep them out of trouble.

The goal is to create 500, 8-week summer jobs for young people ages 16 to 23 in two pilot areas in North and South St. Louis.

The test neighborhoods in question have high populations of young people who face significant academic and social challenges.

St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen will resume discussions next week of the city’s budget for the upcoming fiscal year.

The budget presented to the board by Mayor Francis Slay totals $985 million.

Among the cuts to the budget that Slay is proposing includes essentially eliminating the city’s cable TV channel, known as STL-TV.

The cut was rejected by the board of estimate and apportionment, but Slay says he remains confident that the Board of Aldermen will see that STL-TV is a luxury the city can’t afford.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The Coast Guard is assessing the environmental impact of roughly 300 gallons of crude oil it says spilled into the Mississippi River after more than a dozen barges briefly broke free near Alton, Ill.

The Coast Guard says a vessel hit an area where barges are docked on the river about 1 a.m. this morning, causing 14 to break away from their moorings. Those barges then hit another barge loading crude oil, which caused the spill of about seven barrels (300gallons) worth of oil.

Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

The relationship between faculty and administration at St. Louis University is showing no signs of improvement, and that's putting it mildly.

In what has become a common occurrence on campus, faculty and students took to the streets in protest on Wednesday.  This most recent uproar came after a scheduled meeting between the faculty Senate, Biondi and Board of Trustees Chairman Tom Brouster was cancelled.

Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

If you live in any big city in the Midwest, and St. Louis in particular, you’re probably all too familiar with the site of vacant, empty land where homes and businesses used to be. 

This issue of vacant land in an otherwise urban environment presents tough challenges for cities.  This weekend ground will be broken on several projects which aim to change the way neighborhoods and cities deal with vacant property.

Adam Allington / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis City and County have announced a new division to aid business startups and entrepreneurs.

Called “STL VentureWorks," the project is an extension of the recently-formed St. Louis Economic Development Partnership.

St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley says STL VentureWorks’ five locations will help connect startups to capital funding sources, as well as provide mentoring and training opportunities.

St. Louis Public Radio

Agribusiness giant Monsanto has announced a $400 million expansion at its suburban Chesterfield research center.

The company plans to add 36 new greenhouses, plus additional "plant growth chambers," offices and laboratory space at the Chesterfield Village Research Center, on the former Pfizer campus.  According to Monsanto the project will add as many as 675 jobs over the next three years

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon was on hand to announce the expansion at Chicago’s International Bio Convention.

Adam Allington

Torrential rains which drenched the Midwest earlier in the week are causing major flooding on the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers.

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon has declared a state of emergency and was on site to inspect flood damage on Saturday.

Nixon conducted an aerial inspection of the region northwest of St. Louis from St. Charles up to Louisiana, MO.  Nixon also paid a visit to the riverside community of Clarksville, where a sandbag levee is the only thing protecting the downtown business district.

Anheuser-Busch InBev

The Department of Justice announced on Friday that it has reached an official settlement with Anheuser-Busch InBev and Grupo Modelo.  The deal will allow AB InBev to proceed with its $20 billion purchase of the Mexican brewer.

AB InBev, has been trying to complete a buyout of Modelo, maker of the popular Corona brand, since last June.

The Department of Justice sued to block the purchase out of concerns the deal would put too much price control in the hands of two companies, AB InBev and MillerCoors. 

Urban Chestnut Brewing Company

Urban Chestnut Brewing Company (UCBC) has announced plans to significantly expand its brewing operations in the City of St. Louis.

Reliance Bancshares, Inc.

The Chairman of the Board of St. Louis University is resigning.

Tom Brouster gave notice to the board, citing the need to spend more time at his day job and with family.

Brouster says his decision was not motivated by the turmoil that has engulfed the university over the past 8 months, including a no-confidence vote against SLU President, Father Lawrence Biondi.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

After over 3 years of litigation, developer Paul McKee’s controversial Northside Regeneration Project is being allowed to proceed.  On Tuesday the Missouri Supreme Court reversed a lower court decision blocking McKee’s use of so-called "Tax Increment Financing," (TIF) for the development.

Clinton Global Initiative

President Bill Clinton, his daughter Chelsea, comedian Stephen Colbert and an “A-list” of leaders and thinkers are on the campus of Washington University this weekend for the sixth annual Clinton Global Initiative University.

The three-day event aims to bring students ideas and innovations to bear on a range of global problems from public health, to human rights to the environment.

(Mo. Sec. Of State website)

Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander is taking action against a financial management company connected to the failed Mamtek artificial sweetener plant in mid-Missouri.

In his role as Secretary of State Jason Kander also serves as Missouri’s chief securities regulator.

He’s accusing Morgan Keegan, a Memphis-based firm of helping defraud Missourians based on a list of falsehoods, including the claim the Mamtek held several production patents.  

(via Wikimedia Commons)

The St. Louis Board of Alderman is weighing into the ongoing debate over alleged misuse of taxpayer funds at the Missouri History Museum.

The BOA hopes to use its bully pulpit as leverage to improve transparency at the museum.

Members of the History Museum’s Board of Trustees, as well as its subdistrict commissioners were brought in to testify before the Board of Aldermen on issues ranging from, questionable land purchases, to compensation for former museum president Bob Archibald, to its use of taxpayer funds.

(via Flickr/Images_Of_Money)

So, another week, and yet more news the U.S. housing market is slowly returning to normal.

Numbers released on Tuesday by the Commerce Department show that builders broke ground on homes last month at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 917,000. That's up from 910,000 in January. And it's the second-fastest pace since June 2008, behind December's rate of 982,000.



These days, farmers markets are springing up all over the place, from small towns to big cities. Locally grown food is booming, as shoppers invest more time, money and thought into what they eat. But not all is well in the local food movement.

As St. Louis Public Radio's Adam Allington reports, many of the farmers who supply local markets are barely getting by.

ADAM ALLINGTON, BYLINE: It's a chilly March morning in Elsah, Illinois, near the banks of the Mississippi. But inside Amy Cloud's greenhouse it's toasty warm.

(Adam Allington/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis-based Patriot Coal Corp. has asked the U.S. Bankruptcy Court to modify collective bargaining agreements with the United Mine Workers of America, allowing the coal company to cut health care coverage for retired miners.

Patriot was created by St. Louis-Based Peabody Energy Corp., as a stand-alone company in 2007.  In creating Patriot, Peabody also transferred a hefty chunk of Peabody’s outstanding pension obligations onto Patriot’s books.

via Flickr/TeamSaintLouis (Army Corps of Engineers)

A pair of bills related to transportation on the inland waterways was introduced in the US House and Senate on Thursday.

Illinois Congressman Bill Enyart introduced his first piece of legislation since being sworn into office last January—the Mississippi River Navigation Sustainment Act.

Enyart says the bill would give the Army Corps of Engineers authority that it doesn’t currently have, to conduct operations outside of the barge channel.