Alex Heuer

Talk Show Producer

Alex Heuer joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2012 and is a producer of St. Louis on the Air and Cityscape. Alex grew up in the St. Louis area. He began his public radio career as a student reporter at Tri States Public Radio in Macomb, Ill. and then spent about four years as a reporter and producer at Iowa Public Radio.

Alex graduated summa cum laude from Western Illinois University with a degree in history and earned a teaching certificate in social studies. He is currently a graduate student at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and is pursuing a Master of Public Policy Administration. He has won local and national awards for reporting and producing and his stories have been featured nationally on Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Alex enjoys running, sailing, craft beer, locally-owned restaurants and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Ways To Connect

(Map by Eric Fischer. Data from Census 2010. Base map © OpenStreetMap, CC-BY-SA)

Like St. Louis, Milwaukee is one of the most segregated cities in the United States.

Jennifer Morales is the author of a new book of that explores relationships between diverse groups.

“I tried to work in a wide range of interactions across group lines, whether that was age, gender or race,” Morales told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Monday. The book is a collection of nine fictional short stories

First row: The owners of Earthbound Beer, Los Punk; Second row: Tacos at La Vallesana, ArtBar
(Courtesy: Sauce Magazine)

In South St. Louis, Cherokee Street is booming.

That’s according to Kristin Dennis, co-owner of the Fortune Teller Bar and a member of the Cherokee Station Business Association’s board of directors.

The foundation of the street is Mexican fare and antique shopping but just within the last few years, more than 20 new food and drink establishments have opened.

“Every few months we have new businesses opening,” Dennis told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday.

Janna Linae Schmid is a finalist in the Teen Talent Competition.
(Photo provided)

The Fox Performing Arts Charitable Foundation is putting on its fifth St. Louis Teen Talent Competition on Friday, April 24 at the Fox Theatre.

Of the 39 acts that competed in the semi-final round, 12 will compete in the finals on the Fox Theatre stage for more than $30,000 in scholarships, prizes and awards.

One of those competing is Janna Linae Schmid, a senior at Eukeka High School. Schmid is a singer and dancer and will perform “I Can’t Do It Alone,” from the musical, “Chicago.”

Sarah feeds the owlets.
Mark Glenshaw

Millions of people visit St. Louis’ Forest Park every year. But the park is home to two very special owls that naturalist Mark Glenshaw has named Charles and Sarah.

“There’s connecting with nature in general and then connecting with these great horned owls,” Mark Glenshaw told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Thursday. “They are beautiful animals. I often refer to Charles and Sarah as the Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt of birds,” Glenshaw said.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Even before events in Ferguson unfolded last August, the Organization of American Historians (OAH) was planning to hold a session about race relations in St. Louis.

The shooting death of Michael Brown and the ensuing community reaction brought on new meaning for the OAH, as the group convenes its 108th annual meeting April 16-19 in downtown St. Louis.

Author Benjamin Percy
Jennifer Percy

A flu epidemic and nuclear war have wiped out most of America and only a small number of humans survive in an outpost known as the Sanctuary, formerly the city of St. Louis.

This is the premise of Benjamin Percy’s new novel, “The Dead Lands,” which takes place in St. Louis and mirrors the Corps of Discovery in 1804. In the novel, two characters named Lewis Meriwether and Mina Clark lead a small group west to face the dangers of mutant creatures and a brutal army in hopes of discovering a land where civilization thrives.

Former Congressman Barney Frank (D-Mass.)
Michael Halsband / (Provided by the St. Louis County Library)

Former Congressman Barney Frank (D-Mass.) served in the U.S. House of Representatives for more than 30 years. In 2011, Frank announced he would not seek re-election in 2012.

“I was born with the ability to make people laugh and to enjoy humor. It has served me by keeping me sane,” Frank told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh during an interview recorded last Friday at the St. Louis County Library.

Barney Frank is the author of a new book, “Frank: A Life in Politics from the Great Society to Same-Sex Marriage.”

The U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C.
(via Flickr/Wally Gobetz)

After a two-week Easter recess, legislators are back in Washington, D.C.

“There’s a lot of trying to paint the other guy as the bad guy. There’s a lot of posturing,” St. Louis Public Radio’s Washington, D.C. reporter Jim Howard told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Tuesday.

Even while several candidates have announced they’re running for president in 2015, Howard said that it’s not a distraction; rather it is the main event.

A bill co-sponsored by two local legislators is now stalled.

Eric Christensen, host of STL Up Late
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

If you haven't heard of St. Louis' only late night talk show, you're not alone.

Even though STL Up Late begins its fourth season Saturday night, the interactive show’s reach is limited because it’s a live stage event without a means of distribution. But that could soon change.

“We’ve been doing it for a while and we’re hoping we can get a bigger audience by getting this online or on TV,” said Eric Christensen, the host of STL Up Late. A pilot of the show was recently filmed.

Librarian Gina Sheridan is the author of "I Work at a Public Library."
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

As a librarian, Gina Sheridan sees her share of bizarre, strange and heartwarming stories. She’s the manager of the St. Louis County Library’s Mid-County Branch in Clayton.

Sheridan is the author of, “I Work at a Public Library: A Collection of Crazy Stories from the Stacks." In addition to sharing some unforgettable stories about patrons, the book is also a celebration of librarians.

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