Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Alex Heuer

Talk Show Producer

Alex Heuer joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2012 and is a producer of St. Louis on the Air. Alex grew up in the St. Louis area. He began his public radio career as a student reporter at Tri States Public Radio in Macomb, Ill. and worked for a time at Iowa Public Radio.

Alex graduated summa cum laude from Western Illinois University with a degree in history and earned a teaching certificate in social studies. In 2016, he earned a Master of Public Policy Administration with a focus in nonprofit organization management and leadership from University of Missouri-St. Louis. He has won local and national awards for reporting and producing and his stories have been featured nationally on Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Ways to Connect

(via U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)

Every April 22nd, Earth Day encourages people to consider what’s best for the environment. Started in 1970 by a U.S. senator from Wisconsin, Earth Day has evolved in its consideration of how to combat the troubling effects of climate change.

Climate change is just one of the many factors that affects the sustainability and economic viability of the Mississippi River.

Sandor Weisz | Flickr | http://bit.ly/1VkvzmF

  By the end of this year, the American Cancer Society estimates that more than 49,000 people in the United States will die from colorectal cancer. It is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths.

In 2015, Erica Barnell, the CEO of Geneoscopy, helped start a company that seeks to reduce the number of colorectal cancer deaths by expanding preventive screening through noninvasive methods.

Author Gail Pellett of "Forbidden Fruit: 1980 Beijing" spoke with "St. Louis on the Air" host  Don Marsh.
Alex Heuer

Author Gail Pellet recently released a new memoir called “Forbidden Fruit: 1980 Beijing,” which details her experience working for Radio Beijing as a foreign expert.

“I was hired as the first experienced broadcast journalist to work at Radio Beijing,” Pellett told host Don Marsh.  

Pellett discussed her experiences in China as well as her connection to St. Louis — she was a student at Washington University during the late 1960s and early 1970s.

BILL GREENBLATT | UPI

In our weekly "Behind the Headlines" segment, “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh discussed some of the top news stories that caught St. Louisans’ attention this week with the reporters who covered those stories.

Joining the show were St. Louis Public Radio reporters Jo Mannies, Marshall Griffin and Jason Rosenbaum.

Some of the stories we talked about include:

J. Henry Fair

Sharon Isbin, a renowned classical guitarist, will come to St. Louis next week. Isbin has performed with over 170 orchestras around the world, often joins Garrison Keillor’s “A Prairie Home Companion,” and has received multiple Grammy Awards.  

Although she started playing guitar when she was only nine years old in Italy and primarily grew up in Minneapolis, her return to St. Louis will be a bit of a homecoming.

Scott Schliebe | Wikimedia Commons

Climate change is causing the Earth to change in drastic ways. Global temperatures are rising, oceans are warming, ice sheets are shrinking and the implications are vast for flora and fauna.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says “scientific evidence for warming of the climate system is unequivocal.”

The Peace Train

This summer, a nationwide movement known as “The Peace Train,” will start its tour across the country in Ferguson. The program’s mission? Bringing together people from all backgrounds to sing about shared values and hopes for a better future.

The Peace Train 2016 Tour Across America is modeled off of a similar project in South Africa from 1993 that was documented in the film “When Voices Meet.”

Greg Rannells

The James Beard Foundation today announced the semifinalists for its prestigious awards that honor the best in the restaurant and bar industry. The St. Louis area is well represented. 

Leading this year’s pack locally is first-time semifinalist chef Mike Randolph, who is up for Best Chef: Midwest. Randolph’s restaurant, Público, in University City, is also up for Best New Restaurant. Randolph also owns Randolfi's in University City and Half and Half in Clayton.

Wikimedia Commons

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s death raises many issues. Among them are the possibility of 4-4 decisions until the vacancy is filled and the likelihood of President Obama’s appointment of a successor to get Senate confirmation.

On Monday’s monthly Legal Roundtable a panel of legal experts joined “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh to discuss this and other issues.

The guests were:

Used with permission from Yale University Press. From Eero Saarinen Papers Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library, Photograph by Richard Knight

Originally published July 1, 2013 — Author and historian Tracy Campbell views the Gateway Arch as an architectural wonder which draws millions of tourists to St. Louis, though he also argues the landmark is “an example of failed urban planning.”

To make way for the monument, nearly forty square blocks of riverfront property were demolished.  The demolition began during a public ceremony on October 9, 1939.

City leaders only gained traction for the project once it was framed as a monument to President Thomas Jefferson.

Former St. Louis Cardinals Pitcher Bob Gibson
Aine O'Connor

Former St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Bob Gibson is one of the best to have ever played the game.

Gibson, who was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1981, played 17 seasons for the Cardinals from 1959-1975. The list of superlatives and awards that define his career is lengthy though his new book, “Pitch by Pitch: My View of One Unforgettable Game,” is a snapshot―an account of the first game of the 1968 World Series.

One of RideFinders' 15-passenger vans
(Courtesy: RideFinders)

More than 11,000 commuters in the St. Louis area are registered with RideFinders, an organization that provides free ride-matching services over a nine-county area in Missouri and Illinois.

According to data from the U.S. Census, carpooling is most popular in cities such as Memphis, Houston, Phoenix, Detroit and Dallas. In those communities, about 12 percent of commuters carpool.

Sarah sleeps.
Mark Glenshaw

Updated 5:20 p.m., Sept. 7 with news about Sarah’s passing

Amateur naturalist Mark Glenshaw on Monday reported that Sarah, a beloved Great Horned Owl in Forest Park, has died.

Glenshaw had followed the pair of mated Great Horned Owls for nearly 10 years.

St. Louis educator Julie Smith joined "St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh to talk about her new book on media literacy.
Alex Heuer

Earlier this week President Barack Obama announced his decision to change the name of North America’s tallest peak from Mt. McKinley to Denali, the native Alaskan name.

St. Louis County librarian Gina Sheridan shared 200 of her favorite books.
Alex Heuer

Whether it’s lounging on a favorite chair inside on a rainy day or laying out by the pool on a warm summer’s day, a book is perfect for either scenario.

And, hoping to instill a love of reading, one St. Louis librarian has compiled a list of 200 of her favorite books—in a book!

Gina Sheridan is the self-described “incurably curious” manager of the St. Louis County Library’s branch in Clayton. She’s also the author of “Check These Out: One Librarian’s Catalog of the 200 Coolest, Best, and Most Important Books You’ll Ever Read.”

Katie's Pizza
Sauce Magazine

Enjoying a beer, cocktail or glass of wine at the end of the workday – at a discounted price – is the epitome of a happy hour.

Our monthly Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine seeks to answer the question: Where are the best happy hours in the St. Louis area?

And, the magazine considered several “best of” happy hour categories including wine, beer, cocktails, day drinking, al fresco drinking, pitchers and ambiance.

The selection process was based on four qualities:

An airman at Scott Air Force Base and his working dog pay their final respects to Breston, a military working dog who was put down in June after contracting a blood infection and being diagnosed with cancer.
(Courtesy: U.S. Air Force)

“It was to say our final goodbyes. It was very important to honor Breston,” said Staff Sgt. David Yaronczyk about a memorial service for his colleague, who served in the U.S. military for more than eight years. 

    

Breston worked in Afghanistan as part of a drug detection effort for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and then for several years in security at Scott Air Force Base near Belleville, Ill.

Breston was a military working dog, a 9-year-old Belgian Malinois.

Harley Spiller's coin collection
Alex Heuer

Do you know whose portrait appears on the $10,000 bill? Or, how about the $100,000 bill?

Although they’re no longer produced by the Federal Reserve, President Woodrow Wilson’s face is on the $100,000 bill and it was only circulated internally within the federal government.

Jim Obergefell's ring is fused with the ring of his late husband, John Arthur.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Jim Obergefell’s husband, John Arthur, passed away in 2013 but Arthur's legacy lives on ― in court and on Jim’s ring finger.

Later this month, the U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule on a case in which Obergefell is the lead plaintiff. The case, Obergefell v. Hodges, will likely decide whether same-sex marriage is legal throughout the country. It’s currently legal in 37 states.

“St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh talked with Obergefell and A.J. Bockelman of PROMO. The full interview will air on Thursday.

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson has proposed a new way to rank judges on gun crimes, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce announced that the off-duty officer who shot and killed VonDerrit Myers, Jr. will not be charged because Myers produced a firearm, and St.

On May 23, 2015, the Chinese Lantern Festival returned to the Missouri Botanical Garden for the first time since 2012.
Jamie Heuer

On Saturday night, the Chinese Lantern Festival's return to the Missouri Botanical Garden came amid a sellout crowd of 4,500 people.

It’s extremely uncommon to see an authentic Chinese lantern festival outside of Asia. The garden staged its first lantern festival in 2012 as a onetime event and celebration of the completion of Flora of China, a 25-year project documenting China’s wild plants that was completed in cooperation with gardens in China.

Nathan Pence, jazz bassist and high school senior
Devin Rodino / Jazz St. Louis

JazzU is a program of Jazz St. Louis that places talented middle and high school musicians in jazz combos. Applications for the 2015-2016 season are due May 1 and auditions will take place June 1-4.

This year, 53 students in the St. Louis area are part of the program and represent nearly four dozen schools. One participant of the JazzU program is Nathan Pence, a jazz bassist and senior at Bishop DuBourg High School.

“It’s really just inspiring to be in the program and that just pushed me forward,” Pence told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday.

Kelsey Proud / St. Louis Public Radio

Simon Lusky, team chef for the St. Louis Cardinals and owner of Athlete Eats on Cherokee Street, plans to start operating a food truck and open a new restaurant in Brentwood.

And, as reported by our partners at Sauce Magazine, the restaurant will re-brand as Revel Kitchen. The food truck will be called Revel Kitchen Food Truck and will debut at the magazine’s Food Truck Friday on May 8.

(via Flickr/mike matney)

The city of St. Louis will soon have a civilian oversight board. And, new police cameras in the city aim to reduce crime, but do they infringe on privacy?

Those were just two of the topics before our legal roundtable guests, our monthly show that takes a look at relevant issues pertaining to the law.

Professors Robin Hambleton (L) and Todd Swanstrom (R) joined "St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh on April 22, 2015.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

What happened in Ferguson following the shooting death of Michael Brown and the ensuing protests has garnered worldwide attention.

Robin Hambleton works at developing innovative polices and leadership in cities throughout the world. He’s a professor at the University of West England in Bristol and the author of a new book, “Leading the Inclusive City: Place Based Innovation for a Bounded Planet.”

Dr. William Chapman, surgical director of Washington University and Barnes-Jewish Transplant Center
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

April is National Donate Life Month, a time to remember the importance of organ and tissue donation, as more than 123,000 people are currently awaiting organ transplants in the United States.

Civil rights advocate Frankie Muse Freeman was inducted into the St. Louis Walk of Fame in April 2015
Emanuele Berry / St. Louis Public Radio

More than 140 names grace a section of Delmar Boulevard known as the St. Louis Walk of Fame.

One of three inductees this year is longtime civil rights advocate and attorney Frankie Muse Freeman.

(Map by Eric Fischer. Data from Census 2010. Base map © OpenStreetMap, CC-BY-SA)

Like St. Louis, Milwaukee is one of the most segregated cities in the United States.

Jennifer Morales is the author of a new book of that explores relationships between diverse groups.

“I tried to work in a wide range of interactions across group lines, whether that was age, gender or race,” Morales told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Monday. The book is a collection of nine fictional short stories

First row: The owners of Earthbound Beer, Los Punk; Second row: Tacos at La Vallesana, ArtBar
(Courtesy: Sauce Magazine)

In South St. Louis, Cherokee Street is booming.

That’s according to Kristin Dennis, co-owner of the Fortune Teller Bar and a member of the Cherokee Station Business Association’s board of directors.

The foundation of the street is Mexican fare and antique shopping but just within the last few years, more than 20 new food and drink establishments have opened.

“Every few months we have new businesses opening,” Dennis told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday.

Janna Linae Schmid is a finalist in the Teen Talent Competition.
(Photo provided)

The Fox Performing Arts Charitable Foundation is putting on its fifth St. Louis Teen Talent Competition on Friday, April 24 at the Fox Theatre.

Of the 39 acts that competed in the semi-final round, 12 will compete in the finals on the Fox Theatre stage for more than $30,000 in scholarships, prizes and awards.

One of those competing is Janna Linae Schmid, a senior at Eukeka High School. Schmid is a singer and dancer and will perform “I Can’t Do It Alone,” from the musical, “Chicago.”

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