Alex Heuer

Talk Show Producer

Alex Heuer joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2012 and is a producer of St. Louis on the Air. Alex grew up in the St. Louis area. He began his public radio career as a student reporter at Tri States Public Radio in Macomb, Ill. and then spent about four years as a reporter and producer at Iowa Public Radio.

Alex graduated summa cum laude from Western Illinois University with a degree in history and earned a teaching certificate in social studies. He is currently a graduate student at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and is pursuing a Master of Public Policy Administration. He has won local and national awards for reporting and producing and his stories have been featured nationally on Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Alex enjoys running, sailing, craft beer, locally-owned restaurants and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Ways to Connect

(UPI/Rick Meyer)

The EF-5 tornado in Joplin, Missouri in May 2011 killed 161 people and a left city and its residents devastated.

Two filmmakers - Beth Pike and Erica Tremblay - have created films documenting the disaster, the fallout, and what they call a “remarkable recovery.”

Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

Thelma Golden is the Director and Chief Curator of The Studio Museum in Harlem.

Through art, Golden says, people can have a dialogue about race and culture.

This year, Golden is part of the Contemporary Art Museum’s Susan Sherman Annual Distinguished Speaker Series.

Host Don Marsh and St. Louis Public Radio fellowship producer Erin Williams talk with Thelma Golden about her career and work.

Related Event

The Bridgeman Art Library

The Mona Lisa and The Last Supper are two of the most well-known and recognizable paintings.

The Italian artist, Leonardo da Vinci, was not famous when he began painting The Last Supper in 1495 and he faced much professional uncertainty.  He was forty years old and had left several patrons dissatisfied with his work.

However, The Last Supper, a fifteen feet high by thirty feet wide work, is considered a masterpiece.  It depicts the last supper of Jesus with his disciples and the reaction to him saying he would be betrayed.

Jason Epperson

Jean King and Richard Baron first met in 1968, when the two joined forces to protest conditions and rent hikes in St. Louis public housing.

Together, they earned a reputation as “imaginative leaders” and community advocates, attracting the attention of author/filmmaker Daniel Blake Smith.

Robert Peterson / St. Louis Public Radio

The transition from active military service to civilian life can challenge veterans and put a strain on a city’s homelessness resources.

Ariana Tobin / St. Louis Public Radio

One of the most dramatic military stories of this young century is about the Navy Seal raid that killed Osama bin Laden, in May 2011.

Host Don Marsh talks with St. Louis native and journalist Mark Bowden, the author of the new book, “The Finish: The Killing of Osama Bin Laden.”

Bowden is best known for his 1999 best-selling book, “Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War,” which was later made into a film of the same title, directed by Ridley Scott.

Bowden’s new book about the raid of bin Laden’s compound is drawing praise.

(Courtesy: The Filmmakers)

One of the films at this month’s St. Louis International Film Festival is about the history of Cairo, Illinois, the southernmost town in the state.

Host Steve Potter talks with co-directors and filmmakers Nick Jordan and Jacob Cartwright of “Between Two Rivers.”  Potter is also joined by Stace England, the lead singer of Stace England and the Salt Kings.

England calls Cairo the most fascinating town in America, and a few years ago, came out with a CD highlighting the town.  

Related Event

file photo

Our monthly Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine is about bread.

Host Steve Potter talks with Managing Editor Stacy Shultz, Josh Allen, owner of Companion Bakery, and Ted Wilson, the soon-to-be-owner of Loafers Bakery.

Among other things, they answer Sauce Magazine readers’ questions about bread.

(Courtesy: Jack Rutberg Fine Arts) Work By: Patrick Graham1998-99 Oil and mixed media on canvas diptych 72 x 132 in.

Host Steve Potter talks with guests about an exhibit and discussion on the work of Patrick Graham at Saint Louis University's Museum of Contemporary Religious Art (MOCRA).

Potter’s guests include Jack Rutberg, Director of Jack Rutberg Fine Arts, Father Terry Dempsey, Director of the the Museum of Contemporary Religious Art at Saint Louis University, and Eamonn Wall, the Smurfit-Stone Professor of Irish Studies and Professor of English, University of Missouri - St. Louis.

(via Flickr/Martijn.Munneke)

Host Don Marsh talks with pianist and author Caroline Stoessinger.

Stoessinger is author of "A Century of Wisdom: Lessons from the Life of Alice Herz-Sommer, the World's Oldest Living Holocaust Survivor."

She is participating in the 34th Annual Jewish Book Festival.

Related Event

34th Annual Jewish Book Festival
November 4 – 15, 2012
Various Times
Jewish Community Center, 2 Millstone Campus Drive

(via Flickr/League of Women Voters of California)

Women are not a homogenous voting bloc in elections though their influence as a group plays a big role.

President Barack Obama carried 55 percent of the demographic on his way to re-election.

Host Don Marsh talks with two political experts about the role women played in the 2012 election cycle, both as voters and as candidates.

Marsh is joined by Dayna Stock, Manager of the Sue Shear Institute for Women in Public Life at the University of Missouri – St. Louis, and Gwyneth Williams, professor of political science at Webster University.

Robert Peterson / St. Louis Public Radio

The election is over and despite some predictions that the results would take a considerable amount of time to trickle in and may even be unknown for a few days, that was not the case.

Democratic U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill handedly won re-election, defeating Republican Congressman Todd Akin.

(via Flickr/Michael Velardo)

The number of heroin deaths in St. Louis County has decreased in recent months when compared to recent years, however, use of and addiction to the drug in the St. Louis area has grown to epidemic proportions.

voxefxtm | Flickr

It’s Election Day and while we won’t know the results until this evening, we take the beginning of our program to check in with reporters at several polling locations to see how the voting process is moving along.

Host Don Marsh talks with St. Louis Public Radio’s Julie Bierach and Tri States Public Radio’s Jason Parrott about voting in St. Louis, Missouri and Quincy, Illinois.

Adam Allington/St. Louis Public Radio

The race for U.S. Senate in Missouri between Democratic incumbent Senator Claire McCaskill and Republican Congressman Todd Akin is close and has garnered national attention.

Recent polling data shows Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney leads in Missouri, as does McCaskill over Akin, by a slim margin.

(via Flickr/peter.a_photography)

The Drug Policy Alliance bills itself as the “nation’s leading organization promoting alternatives to current drug policy that are grounded in science, compassion, health and human rights.”

The organization believes the war on drugs is doing more harm than good and among other things, the DPA supports the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes.

Host Don Marsh talks with Ethan Nadelmann, the founder and Executive Director of the Drug Policy Alliance

(Courtesy: Cinema St. Louis)

The Whitaker St. Louis International Film Festival is one of the largest film festivals in the Midwest. 

In the coming weeks, more than 400 films will be screened and many of them will receive their only St. Louis exposure at the festival.

Host Steve Potter talks with Cliff Froehlich, the Executive Director of Cinema St. Louis, and filmmaker Frank Popper.

Related Event

Ariana Tobin / St. Louis Public Radio

The Radio City Christmas Spectacular starring the Rockettes is one the country’s most watched live holiday productions.

This year the Rockettes return to St. Louis to perform at the Peabody Opera House, where they were founded by Russell Markert in 1925.  Then, they were known as the Missouri Rockets.

Courtesy SLSC, Copyright IMAX Corporation

The Saint Louis Science Center has an exhibition and is showing a documentary film about wildlife rescue and rehabilitation.

Host Steve Potter talks with David Lickley, the director of Born to be Wild, about the film on orphaned orangutans and elephants and the people who rescue them.  Steve also talks with Bert Vescolani, the President and CEO of the Saint Louis Science Center, about the Wildlife Rescue Exhibition.

Robert Peterson / St. Louis Public Radio

In the last of four discussions as part of our town hall meeting about statewide ballot issues we take a look at Amendment 3, concerning proposed changes to the way some judges are selected in Missouri.

Host Don Marsh talks with Republican state Senator Jim Lembke of St. Louis County and former Chief Justice of the Missouri Supreme Court William Ray Price, Jr.  Lembke says Amendment 3 is a step in the right direction while Price opposes it.

Official Ballot Title: (source: Missouri Secretary of State website)