Amanda Honigfort

Production Intern

Amanda graduated from Saint Louis University in May with a degree in Communication and an emphasis in Journalism and Media Studies, as well as minors in Marketing and Film Studies. 

She is a public media and film enthusiast, and has served as president and news director of SLU-TV, Saint Louis University's student-run television station. She has also been based in Washington D.C. interning for both Washington Week In Review with Gwen Ifill and TED Radio Hour. Born and raised in St. Louis, she grew up listening to the station constantly, grew to love it, and was thrilled to work with St. Louis on The Air and Cityscape.

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Amanda Honigfort

During World War II, thousands of B-17 Flying Fortress bombers took to the skies daily. The planes were a crucial part of campaigns, from the bombing of Dresden to D-Day, and were flown by the likes of Clark Gable, Jimmy Stewart and Lt. Col. Basil Hackleman.

Hackleman, who now lives in Springfield, Mo., was the original pilot of the Nine-o-Nine, a celebrated B-17 that is said to have never lost a crew member or abort a mission because of mechanical failure. The plane was scrapped after the war.

A protester on Aug. 16 in Ferguson
Durrie Bouscaren / St. Louis Public Radio

Images from Ferguson are everywhere.

It’s difficult to avoid news of Michael Brown’s death and the community response. And with students returning to school, educators are likely to encounter the topics in the classroom and seek guidance on how to discuss them. As discussed on St. Louis on the Air, different approaches are required for different age groups.

The Response in Early Childhood Classrooms

Stephanie Lecci / St. Louis Public Radio

Amy Hunter and Reena Hajat want to help us communicate. They want to improve the dialogue between people of different races in the city.  

“I think [the unrest in Ferguson was] a long time coming,” said Hajat, executive director of the Diversity Awareness Partnership, which helps community organizations navigate difficult conversations about race, racism, marginalization and disempowerment. She said the city has not been communicating well about racial issues for decades.

Véronique LaCapra / St. Louis Public Radio

Yoga is supposed to take place in a quiet, secluded studio with peaceful music, right? Maybe not in St. Louis. Lately, yoga groups have been meeting in breweries, on paddleboards and under the Gateway Arch.

Yoga Buzz STL introduces yogis to local craft beer and wine, and introduces beer and wine fans to yoga. It is an hour-long all-levels yoga class followed by a tasting at the brewery.

Flickr/Jeremy Noble

With the clear, warm weather of summer, more St. Louisans of all ages are taking to the streets and the sidewalks on foot and by bike. The city has plans in the works to make walking, biking and running easier, from Complete Streets to separated bike lanes.

“I think overall we have great facilities in St. Louis and there has been a lot of improvement in the five years that I’ve lived here,” said Aaron Hipp, assistant professor of social work at Washington University in St. Louis. His research evaluates how built communities affect the activity and health of those who use them.

(St. Louis Public Radio file photo)

Like many cities around the country, St. Louis is dealing with the ongoing problem of urban crime. Just over half-way through the year, St. Louis Metropolitan Police Chief Sam Dotson says overall crime is down over 11 percent, and violent crime is down almost 6 percent. Overall crime in the city is down almost 50 percent since 2006.

“We have many fewer crimes now than we did just five years ago,” Dotson said Wednesday. With one noticeable exception.

file photo

Seven months ago, the St. Louis Beacon and St. Louis Public Radio officially merged. What’s happened? And what’s next? St. Louis Public Radio general manager, Tim Eby, and news editor Margaret Wolf Freivogel joined host Don Marsh to talk about where the organization is today.  

Wikimedia Commons

On July 15, 1948, President Harry S. Truman received the Democratic nomination for president – hardly an upset as he was already president. He took his first oath of office on April 12, 1945, following the death of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Truman’s entrance to politics, however, hardly suggested a rise to the presidency. He grew up on a farm, worked as bank clerk and ran a men’s clothing business that failed. After that, politics looked like the only good career option.

At that point, political boss Tom Pendergast largely ran Kansas City politics.

Mike Rohlfing

Cinema St. Louis’ 2014 St. Louis Filmmaker's Showcase kicks off Sunday, July 13, and runs through Thursday, July 17.

Each year, Cinema St. Louis gets about 120 submissions from both professional and amateur filmmakers. Chris Clark, artistic director of the organization, says the most important criteria is whether the filmmakers have told a good story and told it in a cohesive way. 

Ligaya Figueras

St. Louis currently boasts about 15 Vietnamese restaurants, but that wasn't the case when Qui Tran’s family opened Mai Lee, one of St. Louis' first Vietnamese restaurants, in 1985. On this month’s Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine, we talked about the Vietnamese dining scene with Ligaya Figueras, executive editor of Sauce Magazine, and Qui Tran of Mai Lee.

Sarah Paulsen

On Feb. 7, 2008, Cookie Thornton, a resident of the Meacham Park neighborhood in Kirkwood, entered a Kirkwood City Council meeting and started shooting. Six people died, including Thornton.

Filmmaker Sarah Paulsen has recently produced an animated film, Elegy to Connie, that focuses on the story of Kirkwood Councilwoman Connie Karr, one of the victims, and her efforts to give greater voice to women and minorities.

Flikr/Yodod

In April, Boko Haram, an extremist group in Nigeria that opposes western education, kidnapped over 200 Nigerian schoolgirls and women and more kidnappings have followed. Thus far, the government has not located the girls. NPR is following the story.

Nigeria native Benjamin Ola Akande is the dean of the George Herbert Walker School of Business and Technology at Webster University. He is following the situation closely, and was in Nigeria about three months ago.

Field of students at a graduation
(via Flickr/j.o.h.n. walker)

As a junior in high school, Ayont Young figured she’d go to Missouri State University to study nursing. It was the only college she’d looked at and she was sure she could get in. Then, she signed up for College Summit’s summer Peer Leader program.

College Summit is a local answer to the lack of academic support and resources in some communities nationwide. Program leaders encourage their students to reach higher and work harder – while giving them the support they need to do so.

Nic Tullis

The Sheldon has its own way of celebrating St. Louis’ birthday. Its new exhibit "The City at 250: A Celebration of St. Louis in Photographs" stemmed from a city-wide photo contest the Sheldon launched with the Beacon (now part of St. Louis Public Radio) that received over 500 entries. Focusing on photos of the city as it is today, the exhibit is a companion to the Sheldon's “Imagining the Founding of St. Louis.” Together, they offer a then and now view for the city’s 250th celebration.

Bridgeton Landfill
Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

 Missourians need to be worried – and need to act.

That is the message of Environmental Missouri: Issues and Sustainability — What You Need to Know, a new book from Webster University journalism professor and Times Newspapers editor Don Corrigan.  The book is an overview of various aspects of our environment and sustainability shortfalls – in addition to what we are doing right.

(Credit: Flickr/Free Grunge Texutres

Randa Herman of Marion, Ill., always knew something was wrong. Her menstrual period came late and wasn’t regular. She had extra hair growth where there wasn’t supposed to be any, and acne after adolescence.

Eventually, Herman discovered her troubles were caused by Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and found her way to Dr. Valerie Ratts' office at Washington University’s School of Medicine.

Courtesy of Brian Gass

 Brian Gass is a bit different than many of the people he encounters hiking the Pacific Crest Trail. He spends a lot more time concerned with his skin. Gass has ichthyosis, a rare genetic skin disease that manifests itself as thickening or thinning of the skin, sometimes giving a scaly appearance or becoming very dry, flaky and itchy. For Gass, it requires copious amounts of lotion, long-sleeves, and frequent night-hiking to avoid the sun. Gass talked to St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh earlier this week from Lake Tahoe.  

Courtesy of the Missouri History Museum

Climbing to the top of the Compton Hill Water Tower can give an excellent view of the city, but near its base you can find a much more controversial sight: a 100-year old naked woman. Reservoir Park, at South Grand and Shaw, is home to the Naked Truth monument which honors three turn-of-the-century German-American journalists.

Courtesy of The Archives of the University City Public Library

This year marks two anniversaries from St. Louis’ film history: it is the 90th anniversary of the Tivoli Theater, and the 70th anniversary of Meet Me in St. Louis, which is perhaps the film that most often comes to mind when St. Louis is mentioned. Though Meet Me in St. Louis was shot entirely outside of the city, many pictures, both before and after the Judy Garland classic, were filmed here. Today on St. Louis on the Air we discussed a few of them, and the people who contributed to the films we love.

(Amanda Honigfort/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Judy Garland classic Meet Me In St. Louis had its world premiere in St. Louis on Nov. 22, 1944, but it still draws a crowd. On May 2, the Missouri History Museum hosted a Meet Me in St. Louis film screening and sing-a-long in conjunction with the film’s 70th anniversary and their 250 in 250 exhibit. 

Listen to what the film means to some of the fans attending the sing-a-long:

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