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The Associated Press

Associated Press

This content is either partially or entirely curated from St. Louis Public Radio's subscription to the Associated Press news wire.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Two suits were filed Thursday in Jefferson City challenging Missouri officials for failing to disclose information about the drugs the state uses in lethal injections.

provided by the office of Sen. Claire McCaskill

Members of a Senate panel Wednesday accused General Motors of trying to cover up problems with an ignition switch that is now tied to 13 deaths.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Illinois residents would continue paying a 5-percent income tax rate under the much-anticipated budget proposal Gov. Pat Quinn presented Wednesday. 

Illinois' income tax rate is supposed to expire in January, midway through the fiscal year. But Quinn says that would cause "savage cuts" to schools and other critical state services. Instead, the governor wants to make the higher income tax rate permanent.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

A hike in the minimum wage, sending more children to preschool and more grants for low-income college students are all part of the agenda Governor Pat Quinn laid out Wednesday in his State of the State address.

Five years to the day after he first became governor, Pat Quinn tried to make the case that Illinois is "making a comeback." It's also the anniversary of when lawmakers removed his predecessor from office. Ex-Gov. Rod Blagojevich is now serving a federal prison sentence for corruption.

Quinn says he's helped restore integrity to state government.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Updated at 5:50 p.m. Monday with information from latest city briefing

comedy_nose / Flickr

Updated 5:06 p.m. with statement from Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 

The Missouri Supreme Court has again upheld a law requiring unaccredited school districts to pay for students who chose to attend elsewhere.

The Illinois Capitol in Springfield
Flickr | jglazer75

Will be updated.

A spokesman for House Speaker Michael Madigan says legislative leaders have reached a deal to solve the state's $100 billion pension crisis.

Steve Brown says he was told of the agreement following a leaders meeting Wednesday.

Brown says the speaker's staff is putting together an "explanatory memo" for lawmakers and will send details of the proposed legislation to them Friday.

(via Enyart's campaign)

Will be updated.

Southern Illinois Congressman Bill Enyart officially announced Tuesday that he's running for re-election.

The announcement is a formality as Enyart already shared  his intentions back in May.

Enyart, 64, made two stops Tuesday to share the news, one in his home-base of Belleville, Ill. and another in Carbondale, Ill.  

(via Flickr / _J_D_R_)

Missouri businesses will have to shell out more money for unemployment taxes next year in order to pay down debt the state owes to the federal government.

Missouri began borrowing federal dollars in 2008 to pay for jobless benefits after an economic downturn drained the state's unemployment benefits trust fund.  Brendan Cossette with the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry says that led to the feds levying a surcharge on Missouri businesses to repay the borrowed money.

(Via Flickr/Rosemary)

Missouri will allow health insurance companies to continue offering policies that otherwise would have been canceled under the terms of the new federal health care law.

Gov. Jay Nixon announced Thursday that the state will let insurers sell individual and small-group policies in 2014 that were to be canceled because they didn't meet federal coverage requirements taking effect next year. 

via Flickr/BluEyedA73

Will be updated.

Illinois is now the 16th state to allow same-sex marriage. 

Gov. Pat Quinn signed a bill into law Wednesday in Chicago that makes the state the largest in the Midwest to legalize gay weddings. The law takes effect in June when county clerks can begin issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

Illinois allowed civil unions in 2011, but it was a bumpy road to same-sex marriage in President Barack Obama's home state.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Another proposal for revamping Missouri's Medicaid system was heard Tuesday before a House interim committee examining ways to reform the system.

(Missouri Department of Corrections)

Update 7:52 a.m 11/20/13:

Missouri carried out the execution of Joseph Paul Franklin a little after 6 a.m. He was put to death after courts overturned Tuesday's stays of execution.

Yesterday, two federal judges issued stays of execution.

The judges took issue with how the state was getting its lethal injection drug from a secret source not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, and questioned whether the inmate was mentally competent to be executed.

The state of Missouri, led by Attorney General Chris Koster, appealed quickly.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has refused to halt the execution of white supremacist serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin, calling his crime in Missouri a "cowardly and calculated shooting."

Nixon's office announced the decision Monday afternoon.

Tim Eby / St. Louis Public Radio

Will be updated

A fast moving storm system damaged buildings, uprooted trees and downed power lines across the St. Louis region on Sunday and left tens of thousands of Missourians without power.

Ameren Missouri was reporting more than 37,000 outages Sunday afternoon, mostly in the St. Louis area.

(UPI file photo/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is calling for a moratorium with neighboring Kansas on efforts to lure companies across the border.

In a speech to the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce, Nixon said economic incentives should be used to attract new businesses to the area rather than simply relocating ones already there. Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback has suggested a similar pact, though no formal agreement has been reached.

(WikepediaCommons)

Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill said today that President Obama should’ve apologized to the millions of Americans whose health insurance was canceled because it failed to meet Affordable Care Act requirements.

“These problems are inexcusable, and it’s embarrassing,” McCaskill said. 

McCaskill’s comments follow remarks made yesterday by former President Bill Clinton, who said President Obama should find a way to let people keep their health coverage, even if it means changing the new insurance law. 

via Flickr | frankjuarez

A state audit released Tuesday finds that local governments and school districts in Missouri have cost themselves $43 million by not allowing competition for underwriting public bonds.

State Auditor Tom Schweich (R) cites the practice of negotiated bond sales, in which an underwriter is hired in advance and sometimes acts as a financial advisor to the local government that issues the bond.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Hundreds of bidders, most presumably St. Louis Cardinals fans, now own a piece of Stan Musial memorabilia after an online auction of his possessions.

Officials with Heritage Auctions of Dallas said Monday that winning bids for the month-long auction totaled $1.2 million, far more than expected. The auction ended Saturday.

Items ranged from game-worn jerseys to World Series rings to Musial's legendary harmonicas.

Mo. House Communications

The chair of a Missouri House interim committee on Medicaid has offered the beginnings of a potential plan to overhaul the system.

It includes expanding Medicaid coverage to around 225,000 adults while eliminating or reducing coverage for children and blind adults eligible for federally subsidized insurance policies.  State Representative Jay Barnes (R, Jefferson City) says the potential changes could save the state around $42 million by the time they're fully implemented.

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