The Associated Press

Associated Press

This content is either partially or entirely curated from St. Louis Public Radio's subscription to the Associated Press news wire.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Hundreds of bidders, most presumably St. Louis Cardinals fans, now own a piece of Stan Musial memorabilia after an online auction of his possessions.

Officials with Heritage Auctions of Dallas said Monday that winning bids for the month-long auction totaled $1.2 million, far more than expected. The auction ended Saturday.

Items ranged from game-worn jerseys to World Series rings to Musial's legendary harmonicas.

Mo. House Communications

The chair of a Missouri House interim committee on Medicaid has offered the beginnings of a potential plan to overhaul the system.

It includes expanding Medicaid coverage to around 225,000 adults while eliminating or reducing coverage for children and blind adults eligible for federally subsidized insurance policies.  State Representative Jay Barnes (R, Jefferson City) says the potential changes could save the state around $42 million by the time they're fully implemented.

(Flickr/HackingNetflix)

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon is proposing a Thanksgiving week meeting with Missouri lawmakers to discuss potential changes to the Medicaid health care system.

Nixon wants to meet Nov. 26 with members of House and Senate interim committees who have been studying potential Medicaid changes ahead of the 2014 session. The governor says he wants to talk about ways to "provide better outcomes for patients and better returns for taxpayers."

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Will be updated further.

Updated 9:39 a.m. Nov. 6:

The final step to make same-sex marriage legal in Illinois, Gov. Quinn's signature, will come this month at a big event, Illinois Public Radio's Amanda Vinicky reports:

Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Illinois Congressman John Shimkus has kicked off his latest re-election campaign.

The nine-term Republican announced his bid Monday in Danville as he began a two-day tour around the 15th Congressional District.

The heavily Republican district includes 33 counties and runs from Hoopeston along the Indiana state line to Collinsville, where Shimkus is from.

Shimkus was first elected to Congress in 1996 and is a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

(Erin Williams / St. Louis Public Radio)

An East St. Louis museum dedicated to late choreographer and civil rights activist Katherine Dunham is getting a $100,000 state grant for fix-ups, but an unpaid utility bill could cast the site into darkness.

The Belleville News-Democrat reports administrators of the landmark need to pay St. Louis-based Ameren $486 by Thursday to keep the lights on. Dunham considered East St. Louis her adoptive home. She pioneered a dance technique combining Caribbean and African styles. She died in 2006 at age 96.

(via Flickr/katerha)

Missouri has awarded an additional $4.2 million in grants to improve facilities at six child care centers around the state.

Gov. Jay Nixon is touting the funding through the Department of Economic Development as part of what he calls the "Missouri Start Smart" initiative to expand access to early childhood education.

The money will help expand three preschool facilities in the St. Louis area, one in the Macon area in northern Missouri, and one each in the Calhoun and Polo school districts in western Missouri:

Official Photo, U.S. House of Representatives

Former Missouri Congressman Ike Skelton, a champion of the military who served 17 terms in the U.S. House before losing a re-election bid in 2010, has died. He was 81.

Skelton died Monday at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington, Va., surrounded by family and friends, including longtime colleague Russell Orban. 

The cause was not immediately released, but Orban says Skelton entered the hospital a week earlier with a cough. Orban confirmed Skelton's death to The Associated Press. 

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

The former director of Missouri's unemployment benefits agency is alleging discrimination in her firing by Gov. Jay Nixon's administration.

Gracia Backer was replaced in March as director of the Division of Employment Security in Missouri's labor department. Her ouster came at the same time that Nixon appointed Labor Department Director Larry Rebman to a different job.

File Photo | St. Louis Cardinals

Michael Wacha and his Cardinals bullpen provided the power pitching. Carlos Beltran injected with a painkiller, came through with a huge hit. And this time, it was the Red Sox who were tripped up by fielding failures.

Mark Halski / Via Flickr

BOSTON (AP) - Given a bit of help by the umpires and a lot more by the Cardinals, the Boston Red Sox turned this World Series opener into a laugher.

(Provided by Alpha Packaging)

Former Republican gubernatorial nominee Dave Spence has dropped out of consideration for a seat on the five-member St. Louis County Board of Police Commissioners, citing the stringent screening process recently enacted by the County Council.

Spence said in a letter released Tuesday by County Executive Charlie Dooley's office that he has no problem submitting to background checks, but he worries that the council cannot safeguard his business and personal information.

(via Flickr/peter.a photography)

Federal prosecutors are cracking down on businesses in mid Missouri that allegedly sold synthetic marijuana.

(via Flickr/steakpinball)

The Illinois Supreme Court is invalidating a two-year-old Illinois law charging taxes on certain Internet sales.

The justices ruled 6-1 in an opinion released Friday to invalidate the so-called "Amazon tax." The ruling determined that the law violates a pre-emptive federal decree prohibiting "discriminatory taxes on electronic commerce."

(Derik Holtmann/Belleville News-Democrat) / (http://www.bnd.com)

Federal prosecutors say a southwestern Illinois man who admitted to trafficking heroin supplied the narcotic almost daily to a former judge now facing drug and weapons charges.

Thirty-four-year-old Sean McGilvery of Belleville pleaded guilty to heroin conspiracy and possession Thursday in U.S. District Court in East St. Louis.
 Prosecutors say Michael Cook was a St. Clair County circuit judge when he got heroin from McGilvery "on an almost daily basis."

(via Flickr/woodleywonderworks)

A Missouri appeals court says a legal dispute over St. Louis County's foreclosure mediation ordinance is moot after a recently enacted state law.

St. Louis County's 2012 ordinance required that lenders give residential borrowers a chance to mediate before their homes are foreclosed. Missouri lawmakers this year approved legislation making real estate loans subject only to state and federal laws. It was aimed at overturning local foreclosure mediation ordinances. Gov. Jay Nixon allowed the law to take effect on Aug. 28.

(via Flickr/Zahlm)

A busy area of downtown St. Louis will close for about a month starting today as part of the project to improve the area around the Gateway Arch.

The Missouri Department of Transportation says Washington Avenue between Memorial Drive and Second Street will shut down after Monday morning rush hour.

The closing is part of a project to create a parkway over Interstate 70 and improve access between the Arch area and the rest of downtown. The multi-million dollar project is expected to be complete in 2015.

Monsanto
St. Louis Public Radio

The world headquarters of agriculture company Monsanto was the site of a weekend demonstration organized by opponents of genetically modified food.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that 500 demonstrators marched Saturday to the company's Creve Coeur global headquarters, where they chanted anti-Monsanto slogans and waded into street traffic.

Organizers of the "March Against Monsanto" want the company to label food containing genetically modified ingredients.

(via Flickr/kcdsTM)

Updated 9:58 a.m. 

An eastern Missouri man accused of shooting two deputies has been killed following a confrontation with police.

The sequence of events began late Thursday when Jefferson County deputies were called to a home in Cedar Hill and 40-year-old Shawn Nims ran away. Deputies returned around 2 a.m. Friday to search for Nims, who was wanted on a felony warrant.

(Via Flickr/Rosemary)

A deadline has been extended for some Illinois state retirees to submit certain health insurance documents because of the federal government shutdown.

Recipients of various state health insurance programs need to provide IRS documents by a late October deadline in order to prove that their dependents should still be eligible to receive state health insurance coverage. But as the federal shutdown drags on, the transcripts aren't being released by the IRS.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

A downtown St. Louis bridge has a new name.

Until Monday, what locals call the Poplar Street Bridge was technically known as the Bernard F. Dickmann Bridge after a 1930s St. Louis mayor.

But the bridge spanning the Mississippi River and connecting St. Louis to Illinois will now be officially known as the Congressman William L. Clay Sr. Bridge.

Clay is a former Democratic congressman and civil rights leader. Clay was Missouri’s first black Representative, and helped found the Congressional Black Caucus.

(Bernt Rostad)

On day two of the government shutdown, it continues to cause headaches, including for a group of Missouri and Kansas veterans that flew to Washington. 

The nonprofit Heartland Honor Flight organized the trip and the closed National World War II Memorial was the first stop Wednesday. The group was met by many Missouri and Kansas lawmakers, who helped them get inside the memorial where barriers had been set up. 

(UPI photo)

Former Missouri House Speaker Catherine Hanaway says she's considering running for Governor in 2016.

According to the Associated Press, Hanaway says a lot of people she trusts and respects have been encouraging her to run for Governor.  The Republican from St. Louis County served as Missouri's first female House Speaker from 1999 to 2005, and was the GOP nominee in 2004 for Secretary of State, losing to Democrat Robin Carnahan.  She also served as U.S. Attorney for Missouri's Eastern District, and now practices law in St. Louis.

(Boeing File Photo)

Last updated 4:51 p.m. with additional information. 

South Korea says it has rejected Boeing Co.'s bid to build and supply 60 new fighter jets - even though it was the sole contender in the bidding process.

Defense Ministry spokesman Kim Min-seok said Tuesday that South Korea has decided to delay naming a winning bidder for the 8.3 trillion won ($7.7 billion) weapons purchase project.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Thirteen Illinois communities will split more than $5 million in state grants to help reduce the risk of flooding and pollution caused by storms.

Gov. Pat Quinn announced the so-called "green infrastructure" grants Saturday.

The money will help fund projects to prevent harmful runoff from making its way into water supplies. The projects include installing permeable pavement and rain gardens or using soil and vegetation to restore forests, floodplains and wetlands.

(via Flickr/KellyB.)

A new report says Missouri's unemployment rate edged higher last month, while the state gained 6,200 payroll jobs.

The state Department of Economic Development said Tuesday that the August jobless rate was 7.2 percent, up one-tenth of a percentage point from July.

The report says the biggest increase in jobs was in the government sector. It added 5,700 jobs - including 5,000 for local governments. The agency attributes the gains to the early start to the school year.

The education and health services sector added 1,800 jobs.

(via Flickr/evmaiden)

Missouri education officials are seeking an additional $6.8 million to help Normandy school district.

The State Board of Education approved the budget request on Tuesday. That's the first step in a process that ultimately requires the support of the governor and Legislature to become a reality.

Students started transferring out of the Normandy and Riverview Gardens districts this year under a state law that requires unaccredited districts to pay the costs for students who want to attend other public schools.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

It was a busy day for the Missouri State Board of Education.

First, the Board heard from Kansas City Public Schools, which is seeking to regain provisional accreditation, citing "rapid improvement."

The Doe Run Company

Arguably the most consequential veto that was overridden last week pertained to southeast Missouri's the Doe Run Company. And just two days after the override, attorneys suing the lead giant reached a settlement.

On Friday, Doe Run settled lawsuits by several families alleging their children suffered health problems from lead contamination in eastern Missouri's St. Francois County.

(via Flickr/kcds)

Today’s veto session includes a look at a bill impacting Missouri gun laws. 

Here's a quick overview of the bill: 

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