The Associated Press

Associated Press

This content is either partially or entirely curated from St. Louis Public Radio's subscription to the Associated Press news wire.

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The Illinois Supreme Court is invalidating a two-year-old Illinois law charging taxes on certain Internet sales.

The justices ruled 6-1 in an opinion released Friday to invalidate the so-called "Amazon tax." The ruling determined that the law violates a pre-emptive federal decree prohibiting "discriminatory taxes on electronic commerce."

(Derik Holtmann/Belleville News-Democrat) / (

Federal prosecutors say a southwestern Illinois man who admitted to trafficking heroin supplied the narcotic almost daily to a former judge now facing drug and weapons charges.

Thirty-four-year-old Sean McGilvery of Belleville pleaded guilty to heroin conspiracy and possession Thursday in U.S. District Court in East St. Louis.
 Prosecutors say Michael Cook was a St. Clair County circuit judge when he got heroin from McGilvery "on an almost daily basis."

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A Missouri appeals court says a legal dispute over St. Louis County's foreclosure mediation ordinance is moot after a recently enacted state law.

St. Louis County's 2012 ordinance required that lenders give residential borrowers a chance to mediate before their homes are foreclosed. Missouri lawmakers this year approved legislation making real estate loans subject only to state and federal laws. It was aimed at overturning local foreclosure mediation ordinances. Gov. Jay Nixon allowed the law to take effect on Aug. 28.

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A busy area of downtown St. Louis will close for about a month starting today as part of the project to improve the area around the Gateway Arch.

The Missouri Department of Transportation says Washington Avenue between Memorial Drive and Second Street will shut down after Monday morning rush hour.

The closing is part of a project to create a parkway over Interstate 70 and improve access between the Arch area and the rest of downtown. The multi-million dollar project is expected to be complete in 2015.

St. Louis Public Radio

The world headquarters of agriculture company Monsanto was the site of a weekend demonstration organized by opponents of genetically modified food.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that 500 demonstrators marched Saturday to the company's Creve Coeur global headquarters, where they chanted anti-Monsanto slogans and waded into street traffic.

Organizers of the "March Against Monsanto" want the company to label food containing genetically modified ingredients.

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Updated 9:58 a.m. 

An eastern Missouri man accused of shooting two deputies has been killed following a confrontation with police.

The sequence of events began late Thursday when Jefferson County deputies were called to a home in Cedar Hill and 40-year-old Shawn Nims ran away. Deputies returned around 2 a.m. Friday to search for Nims, who was wanted on a felony warrant.

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A deadline has been extended for some Illinois state retirees to submit certain health insurance documents because of the federal government shutdown.

Recipients of various state health insurance programs need to provide IRS documents by a late October deadline in order to prove that their dependents should still be eligible to receive state health insurance coverage. But as the federal shutdown drags on, the transcripts aren't being released by the IRS.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

A downtown St. Louis bridge has a new name.

Until Monday, what locals call the Poplar Street Bridge was technically known as the Bernard F. Dickmann Bridge after a 1930s St. Louis mayor.

But the bridge spanning the Mississippi River and connecting St. Louis to Illinois will now be officially known as the Congressman William L. Clay Sr. Bridge.

Clay is a former Democratic congressman and civil rights leader. Clay was Missouri’s first black Representative, and helped found the Congressional Black Caucus.

(Bernt Rostad)

On day two of the government shutdown, it continues to cause headaches, including for a group of Missouri and Kansas veterans that flew to Washington. 

The nonprofit Heartland Honor Flight organized the trip and the closed National World War II Memorial was the first stop Wednesday. The group was met by many Missouri and Kansas lawmakers, who helped them get inside the memorial where barriers had been set up. 

(UPI photo)

Former Missouri House Speaker Catherine Hanaway says she's considering running for Governor in 2016.

According to the Associated Press, Hanaway says a lot of people she trusts and respects have been encouraging her to run for Governor.  The Republican from St. Louis County served as Missouri's first female House Speaker from 1999 to 2005, and was the GOP nominee in 2004 for Secretary of State, losing to Democrat Robin Carnahan.  She also served as U.S. Attorney for Missouri's Eastern District, and now practices law in St. Louis.

(Boeing File Photo)

Last updated 4:51 p.m. with additional information. 

South Korea says it has rejected Boeing Co.'s bid to build and supply 60 new fighter jets - even though it was the sole contender in the bidding process.

Defense Ministry spokesman Kim Min-seok said Tuesday that South Korea has decided to delay naming a winning bidder for the 8.3 trillion won ($7.7 billion) weapons purchase project.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Thirteen Illinois communities will split more than $5 million in state grants to help reduce the risk of flooding and pollution caused by storms.

Gov. Pat Quinn announced the so-called "green infrastructure" grants Saturday.

The money will help fund projects to prevent harmful runoff from making its way into water supplies. The projects include installing permeable pavement and rain gardens or using soil and vegetation to restore forests, floodplains and wetlands.

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A new report says Missouri's unemployment rate edged higher last month, while the state gained 6,200 payroll jobs.

The state Department of Economic Development said Tuesday that the August jobless rate was 7.2 percent, up one-tenth of a percentage point from July.

The report says the biggest increase in jobs was in the government sector. It added 5,700 jobs - including 5,000 for local governments. The agency attributes the gains to the early start to the school year.

The education and health services sector added 1,800 jobs.

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Missouri education officials are seeking an additional $6.8 million to help Normandy school district.

The State Board of Education approved the budget request on Tuesday. That's the first step in a process that ultimately requires the support of the governor and Legislature to become a reality.

Students started transferring out of the Normandy and Riverview Gardens districts this year under a state law that requires unaccredited districts to pay the costs for students who want to attend other public schools.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

It was a busy day for the Missouri State Board of Education.

First, the Board heard from Kansas City Public Schools, which is seeking to regain provisional accreditation, citing "rapid improvement."

The Doe Run Company

Arguably the most consequential veto that was overridden last week pertained to southeast Missouri's the Doe Run Company. And just two days after the override, attorneys suing the lead giant reached a settlement.

On Friday, Doe Run settled lawsuits by several families alleging their children suffered health problems from lead contamination in eastern Missouri's St. Francois County.

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Today’s veto session includes a look at a bill impacting Missouri gun laws. 

Here's a quick overview of the bill: 

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Prosecutors in southern Illinois say they're prepared to file murder charges against the uncle of a 7-year-old girl whose body was found near her home in the small town of Watson.

Effingham County State's Attorney Bryan Kibler says he expects to charge 22-year-old Justin DeRyke on Wednesday with first-degree murder in the death of Willow Long. The girl went missing Sunday from her home as her mother napped. Four volunteers searching for Willow found her body Monday night. Watson is just south of Effingham.


A 65-year-old Vietnam War veteran from St. Louis County received a Purple Heart medal more than 44 years after he was wounded overseas.

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill's office says it helped secure the award for Walter Sitzwohl after his wife contacted the senator's office this summer. McCaskill is a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee.

Sitzwohl was first assigned to the A Company, 158th Assault Helicopter Battalion and deployed to Vietnam with that unit. He later transferred to D Company, 101st AHB in March 1969, based out of Phu Bai.

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A new report says fewer homeowners in the St. Louis area are struggling to keep up with their mortgages.

The St. Louis Post Dispatch, citing figures released Tuesday from real estate data company CoreLogic, reports that about 11 percent of St. Louis homeowners with mortgages owed more than their home was worth. That number is down from 16 percent in June 2012.