The Associated Press

Associated Press

This content is either partially or entirely curated from St. Louis Public Radio's subscription to the Associated Press news wire.

Almost all of the city's murders in 2015 involved guns.
(via Flickr/alancleaver_2000)

Nearly two years to the day after Jacque Sue Waller was last seen alive, the body of the southeast Missouri mother of young triplets has been found.

The Cape Girardeau County prosecutor's office issued a one-paragraph statement Thursday. It said police recovered a body on Wednesday that has been confirmed as Waller.

She was 39 when she disappeared on June 1, 2011. No information was released on where the body was found, and a woman answering phones at the prosecutor's office said no further comment would be made, citing an on-going investigation.

Marshall Griffin, KWMU

Updated 5:02 p.m. May 31

Newly released emails show that Gov. Jay Nixon's administration and legislative bill drafters each had a role in crafting an apparently inadvertent tax increase on prescription medications.

The prescription tax hike is included in a bill passed by the Legislature that cuts the state's income tax. Nixon has indicated he may veto the bill.

(Courtesy Madison County Sheriff’s Department)

A man whose 2007 terroristic threat conviction was overturned may finally be able to put his legal troubles behind him after the Illinois Supreme Court refused to intervene.

The state's high court decided Wednesday not to hear an appeal by prosecutors who are trying to restore a Madison County jury verdict against St. Louis native Olutosin Oduwole.

Odwuwole's attorney, Jeff Urdangen, says that concludes the nearly six-year legal matter. The 27-year-old was released in March after an appeals court verdict.

(Derik Holtmann/Belleville News-Democrat) / (

A St. Clair County judge whose colleague died of a cocaine overdose while the two were on a hunting trip is stepping down from the bench as he defends himself against federal heroin and gun charges.

Circuit Judge Michael Cook resigned Wednesday by letter to the chief judge, John Baricevic. Baricevic says the letter is brief and doesn't offer a reason for Cook's departure.

Cook was charged last Friday with possessing heroin and having a gun while illegally using controlled substances. He's pleaded not guilty. 

(via Wikimedia Commons/J. Pelkonen)

A former St. Louis police officer is facing first-degree murder charges.

The suspect, 34-year-old James Little, is accused in the death of 32-year-old William Dupree. Authorities say Little dropped off his child at the mother's home in St. Louis on Sunday and got into an argument with Dupree, the woman's fiance. Little is accused of shooting Dupree several times in the head.

Little is in custody. He was a St. Louis police officer for five years before leaving in 2007. He was working as a reserve officer in Pagedale at the time of the shooting.

Courtesy of Cape Girardeau Fire Department

Updated with updated details

The National Transportation Safety Board has opened an investigation into what caused two freight trains to collided at approximately 2:30 Saturday morning near Chaffee, Mo., severely damaging a bridge on Highway M.

The bridge collapsed after a Union Pacific train hit the side of a Burlington Northern Santa Fe train at a rail intersection. Derailed rail cars then hit columns supporting the Highway M overpass, causing it to buckle and partially collapse.

(via Flickr/kcdsTM)

Will be updated.

The Illinois House has approved a plan to allow qualified gun owners to carry their weapons in public.

The proposal adopted Friday was brokered by House Speaker Michael Madigan, but it's opposed by several of his fellow Democrats, including the governor.

Gov. Pat Quinn's office has called the plan a "massive overreach" because it would wipe out all local gun regulations, including Chicago's ban on assault-style weapons. That's a deal-breaker for Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who backs tough restrictions to curb the city's gun violence.

(via Flickr/jglazer75)

Will be updated.

Illinois legislation allowing public possession of concealed guns has passed the House Judiciary Committee. It was a compromise backed by Speaker Michael Madigan.

The measure was endorsed Thursday 13-3 and goes to the full House Friday. It comes two weeks before a June 9 deadline set by a federal appeals court for Illinois to abandon its prohibition on the public possession of weapons.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri senators have given up their attempt to pass an overhaul of some of the state's tax credit programs for businesses and developers.

Supporters of the bill set it aside Friday after Republican Sen. Brad Lager, of Savannah, spoke against it for an hour in a filibuster that could have otherwise continued until the session's mandatory end at 6 p.m.

The legislation would have created tax incentives for international air cargo exports, computer data centers and investors in startup technology companies.

kevindooley via Flickr

Two St. Louis officials are facing federal charges that they stole nearly a half million dollars in city funds over the past eight years.

A federal grand jury indicted 43-year-old Thomas "Dan" Stritzel, the city's chief park ranger, and 55-year-old deputy parks commissioner Joseph Vacca.

The indictment released Thursday accuses each man of three mail-fraud counts, alleging they men used various schemes to spend the stolen money on vehicle leases, credit card bills and other expenses.

(via Flickr/MoNewsHorizon)

A former state senator from St. Louis has been fined more than $270,000 by the Missouri Ethics Commission for violating numerous campaign finance laws.

A decision released Wednesday by the commission found that former Democratic Sen. Robin Wright-Jones used campaign money for personal expenses such as food and clothing. She also received vehicle mileage reimbursements both from the state and her campaign committee. The commission also found numerous instances where the campaign failed to report contributions and expenditures by deadlines.

(via Flickr/Jennifer Boriss)

The director of Missouri's Medicaid health care program is out of a job.

Ian McCaslin confirmed to The Associated Press that as of Tuesday, he is no longer the director of the MoHealthNet Division of the Department of Social Services.

McCaslin declined to say whether he resigned or was dismissed by Gov. Jay Nixon's administration.

A Nixon spokesman had not responded Tuesday to questions about McCaslin's departure. A department spokeswoman also had no immediate response. 


It appears that Democrats in the Missouri Senate have successfully stopped legislation that would have redefined what constitutes a maintenance project and exempted those being done on public property from the state's prevailing wage requirement.

St. Louis Public Radio

The Supreme Court has sustained Monsanto Co.'s claim that an Indiana farmer violated the company's patents on soybean seeds that are resistant to its weed-killer.

The justices, in a unanimous vote Monday, rejected the farmer's argument that cheap soybeans he bought from a grain elevator are not covered by the Monsanto patents, even though most of them also were genetically modified to resist the company's Roundup herbicide.

(via Flickr/Bill Ward's Brickpile)

The Transportation Departments says 149 control towers at small airports that were slated for closure will remain - open at least through Sept. 30.

The department sent out a brief statement Friday. It says Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood has determined there is enough extra money, under a bill passed by Congress last month, to keep the towers open through the end of the budget year.

(Screen capture from Illinois GOP website)

Illinois GOP Chairman Pat Brady says he's stepping down for personal reasons and not because of rifts within the party.

Brady announced his resignation Tuesday in a letter to the state party's central committee.

In a phone interview with The Associated Press, Brady says his wife has been battling "very serious" cancer for two years and he wants to focus on her and their four children.

Flickr/Rob Lee

The Missouri Senate declined to vote on an ethics bill, including a proposal to reinstate campaign contribution limits.

The Senate on Wednesday debated the measure that also would have imposed a 10-year period before lawmakers could become lobbyists. The bill also would've required lawmakers to electronically report contributions of more than $25 during legislative sessions.

St. Louis Community College

The President of the Meramec campus of the St. Louis Community College has resigned.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Chancellor Myrtle Dorsey announced in a letter to faculty and students Monday that she had accepted the resignation of Meramec President George Wasson. The resignation is effective immediately.

(Scott Air Force Base)

The U.S. Department of Defense says one of four Air Force members killed in a weekend plane crash in Afghanistan was a pilot who had been stationed at Scott Air Force Base in southwestern Illinois.

The department says 28-year-old Capt. Brandon Cyr of Woodbridge, Va., died in Saturday's crash of an Air Force MC-12 aircraft.

The cause of the crash is under investigation. The Pentagon says there were no reports of enemy activity in the area at the time of the crash.