Bill Smith | St. Louis Public Radio

Bill Smith

Bill Smith

For 17 years, Lawrence Davis says, he did everything he thought a father was supposed to do.

He kept a roof over his children's heads; he fed them. He paid for their school, their clothes and their toys.

"I always told myself I wasn't like those other fathers you hear about. I had a good job; I had two houses. I had my own truck.

"But it was an illusion."

For his children

 

Need help? Call 2-1-1

Jun 5, 2008
2008 photo, 300 pixels, ID of people not given
Bill Smith | St. Louis Beacon archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: June 5, 2008 - Just short of its first birthday, Missouri's new 2-1-1 phone system, a referral service for non-emergency help, is within months of completing an ambitious plan to expand its reach into nine counties in Illinois. Once the program is up and running, it would make the Metro East region among the first in the state to become part of a 2-1-1 system, according to United Way 2-1-1 director Kay Archer.

Health-care officials in Missouri are gearing up for a major campaign this summer to convince uninsured, low-income women to take advantage of free vaccinations to guard against human papillomavirus or HPV, which can cause cervical cancer.

A poster for prevention

Health-care foundation of greater Kansas City

Dr. Joshua Dowling is part of a team positioning a patient to use a Gamma Knife
Provided by the hospitals | St. Louis Beacon archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Despite significant medical advances in dealing with many types of cancers over the past decade, aggressive brain tumors remain extremely difficult to treat successfully.

As a result, Sen. Ted Kennedy and patients like him have a only a slight chance of surviving more than a couple of years.

That is the grim assessment of two of the St. Louis area's top experts on brain cancer.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: This year' 36th annual Gypsy Caravan marks a kind of homecoming for Belleville antiques dealers Al and Jeannine Meinen, as the giant Memorial Day crafts and antiques market returns to the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus after a seven-year hiatus.

"It's always a lot of fun," said Al Meinen, who with his wife, has sold vintage furniture and other primitives at 20 Gypsy Caravan events. "We certainly sell, but we're always buying too, always looking," he said. "And we love visiting with people from all over the country."

Ameren Vice President Richard Mark shows the type of cables that are being put under ground to improve reliability.300 pixels 2008 photo
Provided by AmerenUE | St. Louis Beacon archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Even as AmerenUE battled a new round of power outages brought on by weekend storms, the Missouri utility giant continues to ramp up its plan to move more and more of its most vulnerable electrical lines underground.

Even as AmerenUE battled a new round of power outages brought on by weekend storms, the Missouri utility giant continues to ramp up its plan to move more and more of its most vulnerable electrical lines underground.

Underground wires

 

Photo courtesy of AmerenUE

Ameren Vice President Richard Mark shows the type of cables that are being put under ground to improve reliability.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Just weeks from the start of another summer travel season, St. Louisans are taking a hard look at whether escalating gasoline costs have priced them out of their dream vacations.

Michael Right, vice president for public affairs for the AAA Auto Club of Missouri, notes that the average price of a gallon of self-service regular unleaded averaged $1.39 in the month of May just five years ago.

King huddles with Pam Whitcraft of the Human Society in St. Louis. Until the trials are over concerning the dogfights King participated in, he can't be adopted.
Bill Smith | Beacon archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In a small, fenced exercise yard off Macklind Avenue, Humane Society of Missouri employee Pam Whitcraft and King -- a 3-year-old male pit bull with a coat the color of yellow sand -- were taking full advantage of the warm sunshine for a few precious minutes of outside playtime.

A strong wind was kicking up clouds of dust inside the pen, but it was not the wind that was bothering the animal this Thursday morning.