Brent Jones | St. Louis Public Radio

Brent Jones

Data Visual Specialist

Brent Jones is a journalist who works with data and design. He joined the St. Louis Beacon after graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Journalism from Southern Illinois University Carbondale in 2007. In the past five years, he has shot photos of the Pevely Dairy fire and flooding in Cairo, Ill.; compiled data on St. Louis' hottest days and whitest Christmases; edited a 30-minute video on music in Iraq; designed a 150+ page ebook; and produced audio from an improv show and more than 100 Beacon Roundtables. Jones lives in St. Louis, where he has completed a half- and full marathon and sings in a 16-member a capella madrigal ensemble.

Ways to Connect

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

Read an analysis of the latest school report cards.

Normandy's annual performance score sank even lower than before, down to 7.1 percent of the possible points scored, lowest in the state.

State education officials have been working in the district for weeks, putting into place new techniques designed to improve academic achievement in the district, which was taken over by the state on July 1.

Bill Greenblatt, UPI

While the killing of Michael Brown on Aug. 9 by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson happened in a community of 20,000, it and the conversations and events it touched off have affected the entire region, the nation and the world. Here, we recap the events since the shooting and give you the context on a map. Though we can't answer why these events occurred, here's the when and the where of Ferguson.

The neighborhood free outdoor summer concert season is now in full swing. If you know of a free series that isn't on this list, let us know.

Up this week: Griffin & the Gargoyles at Jungle Boogie, Miss Jubilee and the Humdingers at Lafayette Park and Hudson and the Hoo Doo Cats at Carondelet Park. But they aren't the only performers at these neighborhood concerts coming up in the next few days. So check out what's coming this week:

Ferguson By The Numbers

Aug 12, 2014

Here's a quick look at some demographics and numbers from Ferguson, Mo. For context and comparison, we've also provided numbers from St. Louis County.

Ferguson's population is 21,205. St. Louis County's is 999,147.

All of these numbers are from the American Community Survey 5-year estimates from 2012.

Tell us what you know

We're working to bring you the latest in the ongoing situation in Ferguson on our live blog. This map will be updated as we know more.

Brent Jones | St. Louis Public Radio

Find your closest cake.

Image by Brent Jones | St. Louis Public Radio

Constitutional amendment statewide results by county and the St. Louis County Executive race.

The neighborhood free outdoor summer concert season is now in full swing. If you know of a free series that isn't on this list, let us know.

You can read more about Javier Mendoza and Miss Jubilee and the Humdingers. Or just check out what's coming this week:

When the Missouri General Assembly passed its tax cut bill, SB509, the Missouri School Boards Association released a chart showing how much money each of the state's school districts stood to lose if the bill became law. The chart compares the difference between Nixon's recommended level of funding for each district and the lower appropriation request that would result as a result of the tax cuts — a total of $223 million statewide.

Brent Jones / St. Louis Public Radio

Very early this morning a "Blood Moon" Eclipse was visible in the St. Louis area. Did you stay up (or get up very early) to see it?

Our Brent Jones did, and shares some of his photos from the event here with you. 

This was a total eclipse — but what about the "blood" color? The Seattle Times explains:

More than 108,000 students missed at least three and a half weeks of school last year. That’s enough lost instruction time to be considered chronically absent, defined as missing 10 percent or more of school during the course of the year.

As St. Louis Public Radio reported on Wednesday, chronic absenteeism can set students up for a string of academic problems. 

Photo illustration of two women crossing the street at 6th and Locust, 74 years apart.
Left photo: Brian Villa | for St. Louis Public Radio; right photo: Richard Moore | provided by the Missouri History Museum

Do you have an old family photo that you'd like to recreate? Try it and send the old and new results to us.

Have you wondered what an area looked like years ago? Maybe the spot was totally different, such as 4th and Market. Maybe it has been lovingly maintained, as in the DeMenil Mansion.

Wikipedia

176 St. Louis-area-born athletes have competed in the Olympic Games, according to a list at Sports-Reference.com, mostly in the Summer Games, and many in events that today's Olympians can no longer medal in like Tug-of-War or Golf. Just 11 of those 176 competed in the Winter Olympics before this year's Sochi games — and only one made the medal stand.

Kristi Luther | St. Louis Public Radio

  • Construction began in April 2010.
  • The bridge cost came in at $670 million including land acquisition, utility relocation and construction
  • The total bridge span has 16.367 million pounds of structural steel and 12 million pounds of reinforcing steel.

Area residents will have a rare chance Saturday to see the new Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge up close before it officially opens to vehicle traffic on Sunday.

It's not often St. Louis sees nearly a foot of snow in a 24-hour period, but it has happened a handful of times since records have been kept. The National Weather Service reported 10.8 inches Sunday at Lambert Airport.

The record — unofficial because of some missing data — is 20.4 inches between March 30 and 31 back in 1890. And just last year, we saw 12.7 inches between March 24 and 25. Here's how the most recent storm compares with the top ten 24-hour snowfalls in St. Louis history:

Flickr/Juliancolton2

Updated January 7, 2014 with century record graphs.

The National Weather Service says the temperature reached 8 degrees below zero Monday,  this cold snap marks first time Lambert Airport has recorded a negative air temperature since 1999.

Here's a visualization of daily minimum temperatures in St. Louis for the past 30 years. Scroll down over the calendar to see later years, and hover over an individual day to see the minimum temperature recorded that day at Lambert Airport.

Flickr Creative Commons Users/Compiled By Kelsey Proud, St. Louis Public Radio

UPDATE: 12-27-13

Even if you missed the Christmas Eve deadline to sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, you may still be able to have your coverage kick in on Jan. 1.

2013
Created by Brent Jones | St. Louis Beacon

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - The University of Missouri and Auburn University are facing off at 3 p.m. Dec. 7 for the Southeastern Conference championship. We’d say, “Go, Tigers!” but the teams have the same mascot.

Ted Drewes fire 11/10/13
Brent Jones | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon - The only fire we’d ever like to hear associated with Ted Drewes would be an Atomic Fireball concrete.

But Sunday afternoon, St. Louis firetrucks were at the classic frozen custard stand on Chippewa. And they weren't getting orders to take back to the station.

Information from DESE, graphics by Brent Jones | St. Louis Beacon

The article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: After the Mehlville School District said that it could accept only 150 transfer students from the unaccredited Riverview Gardens School District, Riverview Gardens added the Kirkwood School District as the second district for which it would pay transportation. Subsequently Kirkwood has said on its website that it could only accept 100 students.

Breakdown of Arch tax vote
St. Louis Beacon archive 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Proposition P, popularly known as the “Arch tax,” passed in St. Louis County's April 2 election with 57,784 yes votes to 51,349 no votes, or nearly 53 percent in favor 47 percent opposed. The 3/16 of a penny sales tax increase will go toward improving local parks, trails and the Gateway Arch grounds.

I spent a lot of Friday with headphones on.

We hosted the first Beacon and Eggs meeting (put together by co-contributor to this blog, Peter Franzen) at Café Ventana, with a panel of people important to the future development of Grand Center. And if you couldn't be there, we recorded it. After we got back into the office Friday morning, I edited it and uploaded it as this week's contribution to the Beacon Roundtable. You can hear it here .

Last week I was frustrated trying to bring the news to as many people as possible. In preparing coverage for the upcoming election, I kept running into unexpected problems.

Even with all the ways to access the Beacon that I talked about here two weeks ago, one place you won't usually find us is on paper (unless you print out an article yourself, of course).

On Aug. 14, I attended a first-of-its kind event in St. Louis. The result was about six hours of conversation among people who live in the St. Louis area and people who work in public media. We talked about things ranging from empowering young women and non-accredited schools to how the Internet is changing local news and what media literacy means in the age of the Internet.

While the bulk of the Beacon's stories are on www.stlbeacon.org , you might be surprised to learn that you can find our work in many other ways. As I said last week, communication requires a sender and a receiver. It also requires  that the sender transmit in a medium the receiver will actually receive.

Grand Center parking 2010
Brent Jones | St. Louis Beacon

Communication requires a sender and a receiver: That's your basic COMM 101 class in college. But there's another important part to the equation -- the message has to be in a format the receiver can understand.

This graphic is part of the story, "Growth in Grand Center seems to find a firm footing ."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: August 26, 2008 - Today, a look at the two Denver papers and how they're covering the convention through blogging and multimedia.

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