Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Camille Phillips

News Producer and Weekend Newscaster

Camille Phillips began working for St. Louis Public Radio in July 2013 as the online producer for the talk shows. She grew up in southwest Missouri and has a Master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism, University of Missouri-Columbia.

Camille has also worked at public radio stations in Columbia, Mo. and Kansas City, Mo. As an intern for Harvest Public Media her work aired on KCUR, KBIA, NET Nebraska, Kansas Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio.

In her free time, Camille enjoys reading, dance, hiking and canoeing. She was drawn to journalism as a profession by a passion for hearing different perspectives and a desire to provide a platform for conversation.

Ways to Connect

Jonathon Pulphus leads protesters in song as theater goers cross the sidewalk to see Annie on Sunday, Dec. 7, 2014.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Theater-goers attending Annie Sunday afternoon were serenaded by two dozen protesters outside the entrance to Fox Theatre.

The demonstrators sang modified versions of songs from Annie, including “It’s a Hard Knock Life” and “Tomorrow,” as theater-goers, many with children, passed by on their way to see the musical. 

Aaron Dickerson paints St. Louis cityscape on the plywood covering the windows of an auto parts shop in Dellwood on Saturday, December 6, 2014.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

More than 30 businesses in Ferguson and Dellwood now have artwork covering their windows instead of ordinary plywood.

Inspired by the artistic efforts of friends on South Grand, Tom Halaska organized the “Paint for Peace” project to coordinate volunteers, donated supplies and businesses in north St. Louis County that wanted to participate.

Halaska, who owns the Art Bar on Cherokee Street, said he wanted to bring people together in a positive way.

(Courtesy Zimmerman Campaign)

The tax status of a high-end retirement home in Kirkwood is no longer in limbo. St. Louis County Assessor Jake Zimmerman announced Friday that he has reached a settlement with Ashfield Active Living & Wellness Communities, which owns Aberdeen Heights.

The assessor’s office and the retirement home operator have agreed that 78.8 percent of Aberdeen Heights will be taxed—netting about $1 million a year for schools, fire departments and public works.

Zimmerman said $700,000 to $800,000 of that will go to schools.

Fast food workers and their supporters pause in front of the Gateway Arch during a march for $15 an hour on Thursday, December 4, 2014.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

Fast food workers in St. Louis continued their call for an increase in pay Thursday with demonstrations at a Hardee’s, a Wendy’s and a Chipotle followed by a march around downtown St. Louis.

The actions were part of a national call for $15 an hour minimum wage and the right to form a union, held on the second anniversary of a similar demonstration in New York.  

Screen capture from official Ferguson Commission website, stlpositivechange.org

Gov. Jay Nixon’s Ferguson Commission meets for the first time from noon to 5 p.m., Monday, at the Ferguson Community Center.

Although the meeting is five-hours long, Ferguson Commission co-chairs Rich McClure and the Rev. Starsky Wilson recommended that the public stay the whole time in order to get to know the commissioners and have the opportunity to contribute to the discussion.

McClure said the commission’s purpose is to listen to the public just as much as it is to make recommendations.

Ferguson City Manager John Shaw, Mayor James Knowles and Police Chief Tom Jackson on Sunday, November 30, 2014.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 6:06 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 30, with a response from Ferguson city officials.

Ferguson city officials confirmed Sunday that Darren Wilson is no longer a member of the Ferguson Police Department.

NAACP President Cornell William Brooks leads first day of march to Jefferson City on Saturday, November 29, 2014.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

About 150 people set out from Ferguson Saturday on the first leg of a seven-day, 134 mile march to end racial profiling organized by the NAACP. Some participants, such as NAACP president Cornell William Brooks, plan on walking all the way to the governor’s mansion in Jefferson City.

Others, such as Tim and Tia Swain, are walking a day or two. The couple drove out from Indianapolis to be part of the action, but have work commitments later in the week.

Tia Swain said she and her husband are marching for equal access to justice regardless of skin color.

Demonstrators at city hall Wednesday afternoon 11/26
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

More than a hundred protesters attempted to enter St. Louis City Hall Wednesday, but were not allowed through the doors. After they were denied entry, they crowded in front of the entrance, chanting “Let us in,” and “Who do you protect? Who do you serve?”

Police in riot gear quickly responded in force, telling everyone to leave because it was an “unlawful assembly.”

St. Louis Metropolitan Police Capt.Dan Howard said the protest became unlawful when someone “made contact” with a security guard.

Near Laclede's Landing
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Several hundred demonstrators marched through downtown St. Louis Tuesday afternoon, protesting the grand jury decision not to charge Darren Wilson for the death of Michael Brown.

About two hours into the protest, a large portion of the crowd marched up the westbound exit ramp to Interstate 44 at, shutting down first the ramps, and then the highway near the Edward Jones Dome. All told, traffic in the area was disrupted for about half an hour.

Benjamin Crump speaking at a news conference in August. (St. Louis Public Radio file photo)
Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

An attorney for the Michael Brown family is calling the grand jury process in the Darren Wilson case "unfair."

 Speaking on ABC’s This Week, Benjamin Crump said that St. Louis County prosecutors should recommend that the grand jury indict Darren Wilson for the death of Michael Brown, instead of leaving the decision entirely in the grand jury’s hands.

ABC legal affairs anchor Dan Abrams interjected, saying that it is not uncommon for prosecutors to omit a recommendation in high-profile cases.

(WhiteHouse.gov video screen capture)
(WhiteHouse.gov video screen capture)

President Barack Obama says he has asked Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon to create a plan for a “careful and appropriate response to any potential violence” that may occur after the grand jury decision in the Darren Wilson case is made public.

Speaking Sunday on ABC’s This Week, the president said he doesn’t want a repeat of this past August.

Before the unity walk in Shaw, participants had to work together to put the word "unity" in order.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

The civil rights anthem “Eyes on the Prize” rang out in the Shaw neighborhood Saturday when a group gathered for a walk to promote racial unity paused beside the memorial for VonDerrit Myers, the 18-year-old who was fatally shot there last month by an off-duty St. Louis police officer.  

The group of about 50 sang and prayed aloud beside the memorial before walk organizer Michelle Higgins spoke. She said that it takes everyone coming together to ease racial tensions and overcome differences that divide people.

Researcher and consultant Iain De Jong speaks about ending chronic homelessness on November 20, 2014 at Christ Church Cathedral.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

Those who want to help the homeless—whether by offering a hot meal or a temporary bed—should focus instead on trying to find them a permanent home as quickly as possible.

That's what researcher Iain De Jong told about 40 people gathered at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown St. Louis Thursday for a presentation on ending chronic homelessness.

via Flickr / Mark Hadley

Farms surrounding St. Louis now dedicate much less land to growing fruits and vegetables than they did 80 years ago.  According to a report released Wednesday by the Missouri Coalition for the Environment, only one tenth of 1 percent of the cropland surrounding St. Louis is dedicated to produce. Commodity crops such as corn and soybeans take up the vast majority of the agricultural land within a 100-mile radius of the city.

St. Louis Alderman Antonio French documents a Ferguson press conference in August.
Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Many protest leaders in and around Ferguson have expressed doubt that the grand jury will indict Darren Wilson for the death of Michael Brown.

But St. Louis Alderman Antonio French says he thinks an indictment is possible.

“I have not given up hope that there will be an indictment,” French said. “I think the evidence warrants at least a trial. And I think ultimately that’s what the community needs in order to heal the long-term wounds.”

French does agree with the general consensus that if the grand jury does not indict Wilson there will be large-scale protests.

Adrienne Hawkins of One Ferguson speaking during a recent Ferguson City Council meeting.
Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Protests in Ferguson after the death of Michael Brown have brought to light long-held racial tensions and community divisions, both in the city of Ferguson, and the whole St. Louis region.

A new organization called One Ferguson hopes to help bridge those divides.

“Everything from courageous conversations about race, to different perceptions between the races, it’s just a huge, huge task,” said Bev Walker, a One Ferguson steering committee member.

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., says she learned a lot from her unsuccessful run for governor in 2004.
Sen. McCaskill's Flickr page

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) says President Obama’s strategy on Iraq seems to be working and should be allowed more time to succeed. McCaskill, who serves on the Armed Services Committee, was a guest Sunday on “Face the Nation.”

When asked whether the U.S. should think about sending American troops into Iraq, the Missouri Democrat said she thinks air strikes have been effective in slowing ISIS down, and that she supports forming partnerships with moderate Sunnis.

U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay speaks with Rhonda and John Kiely at the health insurance resource fair at the St. Ann Community Center on Saturday, November 15, 2014.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay says he hopes more Missourians sign up for health insurance this year, now that the second year of open enrollment under the Affordable Care Act has begun.

More than 150,000 Missourians signed up for insurance last year—about half of those eligible. 

To mark the first day of open enrollment, the congressman visited a resource fair Saturday at the St. Ann Community Center in north St. Louis County. On-site navigators helped people sign up for health insurance, as vendors sold barbecue and salsa music played.

Postal workers protest the consolidation of mail distribution centers, saying they will lower service standards.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

Carrying signs that read “Save Our Service,” dozens of postal workers braved the cold to march in front of the main post office in downtown St. Louis Friday.  They’re afraid that overnight mail delivery will cease to exist next year when up to 82 mail processing centers are scheduled to close nationwide, including those in Cape Girardeau and Springfield, Mo.

One of the credit card meters tested in the Central West End during the trial phase of choosing new meter venders for St. Louis.
Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

The cost of on-street parking in St. Louis will go up in July. The city’s parking commission approved increased meter rates and fines Thursday. Parking meters located in high traffic areas will charge a $1.50 an hour, while low traffic areas will charge $1 an hour. That’s up from $1 and $0.75 respectively. Parking tickets will increase from $10 to $15.

“We’re confident that these price increases are modest enough that they won’t overwhelm the people who pay for on-street parking in the city,” said Debbie Johnson, a spokesperson for the St. Louis Treasurer’s Office.

In this figure, the dots mark the epicenters of earthquakes of magnitude 2.0 or greater between January 1974 and December 2013. The stars mark the epicenters of earthquakes of magnitude 5.0 or greater since 1800. Geological structures identified in the fi
Courtesy Indiana University

With the New Madrid fault just a hundred miles south of St. Louis, it’s long been known that the region is at a greater risk for an earthquake than other parts of the Midwest. But new research indicates that St. Louis is part of an area that has seismic activity of its own.

Parade grand marshalls Velma Jesse, Army WAC, Alice Anderson, Navy WAVES, and Major General Susan Davidson, commander of SDDC at Scott Air Force Base.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis held its annual Veterans Day Observance downtown Saturday. For the first time in 31 years, all of the parade marshals were women.

The celebration began on a solemn note with a formal ceremony in front of the Soldiers Memorial Military Museum. Bells rang and bugle taps played in memory of POWs and soldiers who went missing in action.

Brigadier General James Robinson, left, pins a medal to Leo Hardin's suit coat as Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo) looks on.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

A Korean War veteran from St. Louis received a Purple Heart and three other service awards Friday, six decades late.

Twice wounded during the war, Leo Hardin should have received a Purple Heart with a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster, the Combat Infantry Badge, the National Defense Medal and the United Nations Service Medal when he left Korea in 1953. Hardin, a veteran of the Army's 2nd Infantry Division, served in Japan in the late 1940s as well as in Korea as Private First Class from 1950-1953.

via Flickr/ AJ Cann

A new report on the health of older Missourians says cost and access to health care are key concerns as the state’s population continues to age.

James Cridland via Flickr

The Village of Calverton Park, tucked between Florissant and Ferguson in north St. Louis County, is now among area municipalities that have held amnesty courts. But very few people took advantage of the opportunity this weekend.

On Saturday and Sunday, people could come into Calverton Park’s Municipal Court and clear the village’s outstanding warrants for their arrests. Warrants issued for traffic violations were recalled at no cost, and warrants for crimes such as DWI’s were recalled for a bond of $100.

However, only 8 or 9 people had shown up by noon on Sunday.

Michael Brown's parents, Michael Brown, Sr. (far left) and Lesley McSpadden (center) at a rally in August 2014.
Jason Rosenbaum |St. Louis Public Radio

The parents of Michael Brown plan to travel to Geneva next week with human rights attorneys and Ferguson activists.

The group plans to speak to the United Nations Committee Against Torture and formally present a brief under the U.N. convention against inhumane treatment.

Education summit-goers applaud keynote speaker John Jackson of Schott Foundation for Public Education Saturday Nov. 1, 2014 at St. John's UCC.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis community and faith-based organizations renewed a commitment to increasing equity in public schools at an education summit Saturday sponsored Metropolitan Congregations United, United Congregations of Metro East and the St. Louis chapter of the American Federation of Teachers.

A mix of educators, faith leaders and community members spent the day in discussion, worship and planning for a November 20 walk-in in support for community schools.

Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis and St. Louis County will be able to increase efforts to reduce the number of children in the region exposed to lead, thanks to grants donated Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

The city and county both received 2.5 million dollars from HUD, although $100,000 of the county’s grant is ear-marked for a separate initiative.

According to St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, the city’s grant will be primarily used to preemptively make 180 rental units safe from lead.

The panelists of "Ferguson: Where Do We Go From Here?" at the Amnesty International Midwest Conference: Ferguson Township Democratic Committeewoman Patricia Bynes, St. Louis Association of Black Psychologist President Marva Robinson, SLU Law professor Bre
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

To many on the ground in Ferguson, calls to action have evolved into a movement over the past two months. A panel of local organizers discussed what shape that movement should take Sunday at Amnesty International’s Midwest Conference.

The six panelists represented a range of experience—from the political to the legal and psychological—but they all had one thing in common:  a desire for change in the wake of the death of Michael Brown.

For Hands Up United activist and rapper Tef Poe, that means organizing – while leaving space for differences of opinion.

Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Wednesday, Oct. 29 to include organizer participant count.

Dozens of people armed with hand guns and long guns gathered in downtown St. Louis Saturday to put new Missouri gun laws to the test. With guns slung across chests and strapped to hips, the group walked from CityGarden to the Gateway Arch.  According to event organizers, 72 open-carry supporters participated in the event.

But first, they spent about an hour talking amongst themselves and to passersby.

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