Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Camille Phillips

News Producer and Weekend Newscaster

Camille Phillips began working for St. Louis Public Radio in July 2013 as the online producer for the talk shows. She grew up in southwest Missouri and has a Master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism, University of Missouri-Columbia.

Camille has also worked at public radio stations in Columbia, Mo. and Kansas City, Mo. As an intern for Harvest Public Media her work aired on KCUR, KBIA, NET Nebraska, Kansas Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio.

In her free time, Camille enjoys reading, dance, hiking and canoeing. She was drawn to journalism as a profession by a passion for hearing different perspectives and a desire to provide a platform for conversation.

Ways to Connect

via Wikimedia Commons

From his commission of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, to the name of the city’s most recognizable landmark, St. Louis has particularly strong ties to Thomas Jefferson.

As the editor of “Light and Liberty: Reflections on the Pursuit of Happiness,” a collection of Jefferson's writing organized into 34 essays, Eric Petersen has spent years reading Jefferson's letters and state papers.

DePaul Health Center

Women are both more likely to suffer a stroke, and less likely to be treated in a timely manner when they experience one. May is Stroke Awareness Month, and today on St. Louis on the Air Dr. Amer Alshekhlee of the SSM Neurosciences Institute outlined five risk factors that increase the likelihood a woman will have a stroke.

Over the years, Beyond Housing’s Chris Krehmeyer has appeared on St. Louis on the Air to discuss issues ranging from poverty to home ownership to health and the economy. Most recently, he came to the studio to discuss Beyond Housing’s work with the Normandy School District, a project called the 24:1 Initiative.

Michelle Volansky / Sauce Magazine

In our monthly Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine, host Steve Potter spoke with the magazine’s executive editor Ligaya Figueras and art director Meera Nagarajan about what is up-and-coming in the St. Louis food scene.

Among the highlights of the conversation were what restaurants have good patios, what’s new at the Loop, and two barbecue restaurants set to open soon. Also covered were hit lists of restaurants that focus on being healthy and places that are kid friendly.

photo by David Johnson / Organized by the Pulitzer Foundaton for the Arts & the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts

Updated Monday, May 12 to include the fourth exhibition at CAM.

Three St. Louis institutions are opening major contemporary art exhibitions tonight: the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis and the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University.

In the hope that St. Louisans will make it an “art night out,” a free shuttle service between the Kemper and Grand Center is being provided from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

Courtesy Missouri History Museum

From 1920 until 1933, it was illegal to manufacture, transport and sell alcohol in the United States. In response, an underground culture of speakeasies and bootleggers sprang up, where covert groups met in unmarked locations to drink homemade gin, listened to jazz and danced the Charleston.

In St. Louis, those looking for a drink met in cellars and caves, said Tracy Lauer, an archivist at Anheuser-Busch.  Saloons and taverns shut down across the city, many to never reopen.

As the United States economy returns to a healthier state, one generation in particular is lagging behind in returning to pre-recession levels of wealth: millennials.

Young people in their 20s and 30s have taken a greater hit from the recession than any other age group, bringing into question whether the American dream of upward mobility is obtainable for them.

Washington University School of Medicine

In the not-so-distant future, it will be possible, perhaps even common place, to have computers implanted in our brains, says St. Louis neurosurgeon Eric Leuthardt.

Michael Becker

Some rural Missouri fans of the ABC television show “Resurrection” had a special viewing party of last night's season finale. Residents of Arcadia, Pilot Knob and Ironton (which make up the Arcadia Valley) watched the season finale with actor Kevin Sizemore and Jason Mott, the author of the book on which the show is based.

“It was a terrific crowd,” said Mott. “The whole weekend I got to interact with everyone in the town, and they were just as warm and welcoming as I could have ever hoped for.”

courtesy photo

More than 40 regional storytellers from Kansas City to Peoria, Illinois have converged on St. Louis this week for the 35th Annual St. Louis Storytelling Festival sponsored by the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Performances and workshops are geared for a wide range of audiences, and are spread throughout the St. Louis region in venues ranging from the Gateway Arch to the Cahokia Mounds.

Firecracker Press

This weekend the St. Louis Mercantile Library at the University of Missouri-St. Louis is hosting its 8th Annual Fine Print, Rare Book & Paper Arts Fair. Vendors and dealers will be set up in the J.C. Penney Building Saturday May 3 and Sunday, May 4, with a benefit preview this evening.

University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe
University of Missouri website

University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe was our guest today on St. Louis on the Air. He oversees the management of the four institutions within the system: University of Missouri-Columbia, University of Missouri-St. Louis, University of Missouri-Kansas City and Missouri University of Science and Technology, and has held the position since February 2012.

Courtesy of Lyft

In February of this year, the Metropolitan Taxicab Commission approved a license for Carmel Car and Limo to operate their cab-hailing smartphone app in St. Louis. But the commission has not been so welcoming to ride-share service Lyft, which also wants to enter the St. Louis market.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

With a little more than two weeks left in the current Missouri legislative session, the focus of the state legislature will be on two possible veto overrides, said St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jo Mannies.

She and education reporter Dale Singer appeared on St. Louis on the Air today to give an update on key bills moving through the state legislature right now.

via Flickr/Louise Docker

After an especially harsh winter, spring has returned to St. Louis. Gardeners across the region are planting and planning for the growing season.

But the plants are still feeling the effects of the unusual cold, said Missouri Botanical Garden horticulturists June Hutson and Elizabeth Spiegel.

(U.S. Mint)

Look at this woman's face. If you recognize her, think about how you'd say her name, then read on:

Got it? 

Well, you might be wrong.

She's Sacagawea, the Native American woman best known for her role in the renowned westward expedition of Lewis & Clark, and for her likeness imprinted on that special edition piece of U.S. currency.

via Wikimedia Commons

As young boys, Jerry and Mike Koenig escaped the ghetto in Warsaw, Poland and survived the last 22 months of the war by hiding in a bunker under a barn close enough to smell the smoke from the Treblinka death camp.

On this Holocaust Remembrance Day, they joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh in studio to tell their story. Jerry Koenig is now a resident of Chesterfield, and his brother Mike is visiting from Israel.

publicity photo

The University City Children’s Center is hosting a pop-up circus Saturday, April 26 featuring performers from Circus Flora.

“The fun thing about it is, they will have their circus and they will have their aerial acts and their cyclists, but they are going to do a workshop for the children who are there for the last hour. So there will be an hour of pop-up circus and then an hour for kids to play,” said Stephen Zwolak, executive director of University City Children’s Center.

Zoe Vonder Haar and Jacqueline Petroccia as Louise Seger and Patsy Cline in Stages' presentation of “Always…Patsy Cline.”
Peter Wochniak | Pro Photo STL

After a highly successful run of “Always … Patsy Cline” in 2013, Stages St. Louis is staging an encore production of the show through August 31 at the Playhouse at Westport Plaza. 

Jacqueline Petroccia stars as country music legend Patsy Cline once more, a role she has played a total of four times. Her performance with Stages St. Louis last year garnered her a St. Louis Broadway World Award for best actress.

via Wikimedia Commons

Meriwether Lewis and William Clark are most famous for leading the expedition that began in St. Louis in 1804, took them up the Missouri River, over the Rocky Mountains to the west coast and back.

But their connection with St. Louis didn’t end there. In 1807, Thomas Jefferson appointed Lewis and Clark to leadership positions in the Louisiana Territory, with a home base in the St. Louis region.

via Flickr/Diana Parkhouse

After a tough few years, the St. Louis housing market is looking up. St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh spoke with real estate experts Allen Brake and Brock MacLean to get their forecast for the St. Louis home buying season.

Brake is a realtor with Realty Executives of St. Louis and MacLean is an executive vice president of homes.com, an online home search service.

Larry Kendall

While driving friends home from Western Cape University in 1993, American student Amy Biehl was dragged out of her car by an angry mob and killed. She was in South Africa because she wanted to take part in the fight against apartheid, but to the anti-apartheid militants in the mob her white face symbolized their oppressors.

Ntobeko Peni was a leader in the Pan African Student Organization, the militant political group that formed that mob, and was one of four men convicted of her murder.  

publicity photo

Belleville, Ill. is the setting of a new movie premiering April 22 in the city’s historic Lincoln Theatre. The film, also titled “Belleville,” was produced by the city’s own Ted Trentman, known professionally as Ted Trent.

via Wikimedia Commons

For its contribution to the 250th anniversary of St. Louis, the St. Louis Art Museum is planning an exhibition showcasing the influence of Louis IX on the world of art. Louis IX, also known as St. Louis, is the city’s namesake.

At the heart of the exhibit will be a folio out of a picture Bible on loan from the Morgan Library in New York.

“We believe that the king, Louis IX, actually commissioned this Bible,” said St. Louis Art Museum curator Judy Mann.  “It is of such outstanding quality it had to have been a royal commission.”

via Wikimedia Commons

How did a French king born in 1214 become the namesake of a city founded in the heart of the Americas 550 years later? The answer is woven into the fabric of St. Louis’ identity even now, as we celebrate the 250th anniversary of the city’s founding.

Friday marks the 800th anniversary of the birth of the city’s namesake: Louis IX, the only French king to become a saint.

James Cridland via Flickr

If you get a call saying you owe a fine for missing jury duty, take care. Scammers posing as officials with the city’s warrants department are targeting St. Louisans with that line.

Courtesy Missouri History Museum

Last month, St. Louis Public Radio reported on the discovery of the first physical evidence of the French Colonial settlers in St. Louis at the Poplar Street Bridge. In response, the Missouri History Museum wrote a post on its History Happens Here blog about works in their collection that demonstrate life in French Colonial St. Louis. The historic town of Ste. Genevieve, Mo.

St. Louis Public Radio / Kelsey Proud

In our monthly Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine, host Steve Potter spoke with the magazine’s executive editor Ligaya Figueras and two local chefs whose work takes them outside of the restaurant: nutrition specialist for the St. Louis Cardinals Simon Lusky and SSM DePaul Health Center sous chef Kore Wilbert. Lusky also is co-owner Athlete Eats, a small business that started out cooking for pro athletes in the off-season and now includes a restaurant on Cherokee Street.

Musician Brian Owens
Brian Owens | Jarred Gastreich

St. Louis vocalist Brian Owens continues his Masters Series with the music of Ray Charles Friday, April 18 at the Sheldon. 

“I’ve always been enamored with, not just covering certain musicians, but really preserving their music. Folks like Sam Cooke and Marvin Gaye, I just don’t hear their music a lot performed live with original charts and different things like that anymore, so that … spawned the desire to want to cover these musicians in a setting that was more of a concert setting,” said Owens of the series.

Ray Meibaum

The St. Louis Low Brass Collective Showcase is coming up next week at the Sheldon. Performers in the showcase will include members of the St. Louis Symphony as well as members of the United States Air Force Band of Mid-America.

One highlight of the performance will be a set of jazz duets, said low brass collective member Gerry Pagano, who also plays bass trombone for the St. Louis Symphony. And for the first time, a wind quintet will join the low brass instruments on stage.

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