Camille Phillips

News Producer and Weekend Newscaster

Camille Phillips began working for St. Louis Public Radio in July 2013 as the online producer for the talk shows. She grew up in southwest Missouri and has a Master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism, University of Missouri-Columbia.

Camille has also worked at public radio stations in Columbia, Mo. and Kansas City, Mo. As an intern for Harvest Public Media her work aired on KCUR, KBIA, NET Nebraska, Kansas Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio.

In her free time, Camille enjoys reading, dance, hiking and canoeing. She was drawn to journalism as a profession by a passion for hearing different perspectives and a desire to provide a platform for conversation.

Ways to Connect

Jason Purnell
Washington University

Third Brief: For the Sake of All

The third brief of a groundbreaking and interdisciplinary study on African American health in St. Louis examines how mental health affects social and economic opportunities.

The latest brief in the “For the Sake of All” study asks how we can improve mental health in St. Louis. 

(Courtesy Washington University in St. Louis)

St. Louis is beginning to build a name for itself as a center for entrepreneurship. Last year, funding for tech startups in the region almost doubled, bringing in nearly $30 million in investments. The T-Rex campus downtown - founded two years ago explicitly to foster entrepreneurship in St. Louis - is currently home to more than 70 startups.

Bryan Haynes

For more than thirty years, St. Louis native Bryan Haynes made his living primarily doing commercial art. But when he moved back to Missouri, he began to paint landscape scenes based on the geography and history of the region.

"Seeing it anew, I just started to paint landscapes purely for the joy of it," said Haynes. "But then those shapes in the landscape..began to describe the narrative within the paintings."

Ben Hejkal / (Courtesy Lindy Hop St. Louis)

Arch City Radio Hour is a program hosted by Nick Garcia on St. Louis Public Radio's HD-2 Channel, The Gateway. The show features conversations and performances with St. Louis area musicians.

(Courtesy The Sheldon)

Jazz pianist and St. Louis native Peter Martin returns to The Sheldon on Saturday for Peter Martin Music Live: A Blue Note Records Tribute.

Martin will be performing as part of a quartet with a group he hand-picked: guitarist Peter Bernstein, bassist Reuben Rogers and drummer Ulysses Owens Jr.

"That's the great thing about having your own series," said Martin. "You bring the people you want to play with."

Martin chose to perform a selection of music from the Jazz label Blue Note Records, but had a hard time choosing what music to play.

Brian Naylor / NPR

British leader Sir Winston Churchill gets his share of attention in Missouri. The national museum dedicated to the prime minister who led Great Britain through World War II is located in Fulton. But this week, Churchill was the focus of bipartisan national and international attention, as Congress dedicated a bust of the leader during a ceremony in Statuary Hall.

(Courtesy Barnes-Jewish Hospital)

Caring for people experiencing pain and suffering day in and day out can be trying for nurses and other healthcare professionals. Especially when they feel like the work is never done. That feeling is called compassion fatigue and at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, they've developed a program to help.

Some might equate compassion fatigue with burnout, but it is more complex than that, said Pat Potter, director of research and compassion fatigue program developer at Barnes-Jewish.

(Courtesy: John Waide, University Archivist, Saint Louis University)

The mattress began to shake.  Arms and legs flailing.  For hours he fluctuated between frenzy and calm.

The following phrases describe an exorcism that took place in March and April of 1949.  A cadre of Jesuit priests affiliated with Saint Louis University, led by Father William S. Bowdern, the pastor of St. Francis Xavier Church, undertook the exorcism of a 14-year-old boy. They took turns praying over the boy, working to cast out the demon believed to have possessed him.

Courtesy CityArchRiver

Construction of the Central River Project along the Gateway Arch begins November 14. It is a key component of the CityArchRiver 2015 redevelopment plans. Great Rivers Greenway is taking the lead on the project.

David Greene
NPR

St. Louis Public Radio listeners know David Greene for his work with NPR's Morning Edition, and his years covering Russia and the White House. But before he joined NPR in 2005, Greene was a newspaper man. He credits an internship with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch for jump-starting his career.

www.nationalatlas.gov/streamer

From transporting Native Americans to the founding of the United States and beyond, the Mississippi River is an integral part of American history.

In his new book, Old Man River: The Mississippi River in North American History, author Paul Schneider weaves together all of these stories and more to tell the greater story of a continent formed and transformed by a river which both divides and unites.

The majority of this interview is a rebroadcast from April 19, 2013.

Cellist Bjorn Ranheim and violinist Shawn Weil are colleagues in the St. Louis Symphony.  Double bassist Syd Rodway and composer/keyboardist Adam Maness are members of the Erin Bode Group.  They got to know each other when Ranheim and Weil collaborated with the Erin Bode Group and also shared an interest in good food and fine beer. 

Kevin O'Connor Rutland Herald

After years of going on vacations and dreaming of living in the places they visited, St. Louis native Ellen Stimson and her family decided to move to rural Vermont to be close to the mountains.

They bought a country store, decided to homeschool their youngest son, and began raising chickens. And soon learned that vacationing in Vermont is much different than living there.

(Courtesy COCA)

The Center of Creative Arts in St. Louis is presenting psychological thriller "Turn of the Screw" this weekend, just in time to set the mood for Halloween.

The two-person cast is performing Jeffrey Hatcher's adaptation of Henry James' 1898  gothic novella about a governess in England who takes a new position in Essex and begins to hear ghosts and see apparitions.

(Via Flickr/pasa47)

Drive through the streets of St. Louis, and it becomes obvious that some neighborhoods are doing better than others. Overall, population is down in the city and inner ring of suburbs. But there are pockets of growth and renewal that have popped up.

File Photo | St. Louis Cardinals

As the Cardinals excel on the field, so too does the city and region around it. Postseason action has almost become a way of life in St. Louis, bringing added excitement, tourism and tax dollars to the region,  10 out of the past 13 years.

And this year is no different, says Mayor Francis Slay. With three World Series games scheduled here, the region will gain an estimated $8 million in direct and indirect revenue per game. The city alone will gain $500,000 in taxes per game.

(Via Wikimedia Commons)

A lot has changed in the world of baseball since 1946. But a familiar pair of elite teams are once again playing in the Fall Classic.  For the fourth time, the St. Louis Cardinals are facing off against the Boston Red Sox in the World Series. Previous matchups took place in 1946, 1967 and 2004.

And this year's matchup has some striking similarities to the team's first meeting in 1946. Then, as now, St. Louis Cardinals defeated the Dodgers in playoffs before facing off against the Red Sox.

Danny Brown

In St. Louis, the Missouri River sometimes gets overshadowed by the Mighty Mississippi. But it has center stage in a new book. Missouri River Country: 100 Miles of Stories and Scenery from Hermann to the Confluence combines abundant photographs and the work of 60 authors to tell the story of the region.

"The Missouri is kind of out of sight out of mind a lot of times," said the editor of the book, Dan Burkhardt. "Often times when we do hear about it is when it misbehaves, when it floods." He compiled the book to highlight all the positives the river has to offer.

(via Flickr/stevendepolo)

When mental illness hits the headlines, it's usually connected to mass shootings or suicides. The focus is on mental illness as the reason for a tragedy, and increases the stigma against an already misunderstood  condition, says Mike Keller, executive director of the Independence Center in the Central West End. According to Keller, that kind of negative media exposure has created a human rights emergency.

James Cridland via Flickr

If all goes according to plan, a surveillance drone could be policing the skies of St. Louis by this time next year. According to SLMPD Chief Sam Dotson, the drone would be used in public spaces, and would enable the police to avoid dangerous high-speed chases. But what are the legal parameters? And what is considered public?

Opera Theatre of Saint Louis

"The Very Last Green Thing," an opera aimed for young audiences and performed by children ranging from nine to 16, opens next week at the Touhill. It will be the third production of the work by Opera Theatre of Saint Louis since the organization commissioned it in 1992.

"The inspiration for the opera actually came from kids," said Allison Felter, director of education and community engagement at Opera Theatre of Saint Louis. "We wanted to know back then what was important to them, and it was the environment."

Jeremy Bailey/St. Louis Public Radio

"Harry's Big Adventure: My Bug World" opens October 19th at the Saint Louis Science Center. As a tasty addition, every weekend the attraction will host bug chefs preparing sweet, salty and crunchy bug treats. Cityscape host Steve Potter previewed the exhibit with Bug Chef Jayme Necaise and sampled an array of those bug-filled snacks.

provided

 oday marks the seventh anniversary of the death of 13-year-old Megan Meier, a St. Charles County girl who killed herself after being the victim of online bullying.

This month, cyberbullying is again in the news for a tragic reason. A 12-year-old girl from Florida, Rebecca Sedwick, committed suicide in response to cruel messages she received on her phone.

"What breaks my heart, is not only just what that child [Rebecca Sedwick] was going through...but now also her family...and the entire ripple effect," said Tina Meier, mother of Megan.

For Colleen Starkloff and her husband Max, advocating for people with disabilities has always been about helping them gain independence. When they founded Paraquad in St. Louis 45 years ago, their goal was to enable people with disabilities to live independently.

(via Flikr/NAVFAC)

According to a report released in September by the University of Missouri-Columbia, the percent of people who have inadequate access to food rose more in Missouri than in any other state in the nation from 2000 to 2010.

Approximately 1.3 million Missourians are currently classified as "food insecure." About 400,000 Missourians experience hunger.

Erin Williams / St. Louis Public Radio

To people who feel powerless in the face of today's political structure, Princeton University religion professor Jeffrey Stout has this advice: organize.  He delivers a lecture, "Struggle for a Just Society - Grassroots Democracy in America," as part of the Lee Institute's Speaker Series on Monday, October 28, 2013.

He points to the great social movements of the past two centuries as examples of grassroots organization that affected real change in America -  abolitionists, civil rights and women's suffrage.

Rep. Lacy Clay
St. Louis Public Radio

Amidst the dual crises of the partial government shutdown and the swiftly approaching debt limit, Congressman Lacy Clay (D - St. Louis) is addressing the inaction and hearing from constituents.

Before traveling back to D.C. for an evening meeting of the House, Clay stopped by St. Louis Public Radio to discuss the latest on Capitol Hill with St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh.

Here's what he had to say on the partial government shutdown, the debt ceiling and more.

On the inaction of Congress:

Wynton Marsalis
Frank Stewart / (Courtesy Jazz at Lincoln Center)

Grammy-winning trumpeter Wynton Marsalis will be performing in St. Louis next week as part of an eight city tour of Abyssinian: A Gospel Celebration, a piece he composed in honor of the 200th anniversary of a Baptist church in Harlem.

Abyssinian models a traditional Baptist church service and features the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra and Chorale Le Chateau in addition to Marsalis.

Carmen Troesser / (Courtesy Sauce Magazine)

In our monthly Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine, host Steve Potter discussed the ongoing growth of the restaurant scene in the Delmar Loop with Joe Edwards, the owner of Blueberry Hill and other Loop landmarks, Ryan Pinkston, co-owner of newcomer Three Kings Public House and Ligaya Figueras, executive editor of Sauce Magazine.

Artwork by Bill Kohn / (Courtesy Bruno David Gallery)

A new exhibit featuring the work of the late St. Louis artist Bill Kohn opens tonight at the Bruno David Gallery. The exhibition is small in number, but large in scale, featuring five of Kohn's signature colorful works painted on big stretches of canvas.

"Bill was an amazing painter," said gallery owner Bruno David. "He traveled around the world many times over and made a lot of paintings during his travel, drawings, coming back to St. Louis every time. And some of the paintings that he made, he felt that they needed to be extremely large."

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