Camille Phillips

News Producer and Weekend Newscaster

Camille Phillips began working for St. Louis Public Radio in July 2013 as the online producer for the talk shows. She grew up in southwest Missouri and has a Master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism, University of Missouri-Columbia.

Camille has also worked at public radio stations in Columbia, Mo. and Kansas City, Mo. As an intern for Harvest Public Media her work aired on KCUR, KBIA, NET Nebraska, Kansas Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio.

In her free time, Camille enjoys reading, dance, hiking and canoeing. She was drawn to journalism as a profession by a passion for hearing different perspectives and a desire to provide a platform for conversation.

Ways to Connect

Rep. Lacy Clay
St. Louis Public Radio

Amidst the dual crises of the partial government shutdown and the swiftly approaching debt limit, Congressman Lacy Clay (D - St. Louis) is addressing the inaction and hearing from constituents.

Before traveling back to D.C. for an evening meeting of the House, Clay stopped by St. Louis Public Radio to discuss the latest on Capitol Hill with St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh.

Here's what he had to say on the partial government shutdown, the debt ceiling and more.

On the inaction of Congress:

Wynton Marsalis
Frank Stewart / (Courtesy Jazz at Lincoln Center)

Grammy-winning trumpeter Wynton Marsalis will be performing in St. Louis next week as part of an eight city tour of Abyssinian: A Gospel Celebration, a piece he composed in honor of the 200th anniversary of a Baptist church in Harlem.

Abyssinian models a traditional Baptist church service and features the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra and Chorale Le Chateau in addition to Marsalis.

Carmen Troesser / (Courtesy Sauce Magazine)

In our monthly Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine, host Steve Potter discussed the ongoing growth of the restaurant scene in the Delmar Loop with Joe Edwards, the owner of Blueberry Hill and other Loop landmarks, Ryan Pinkston, co-owner of newcomer Three Kings Public House and Ligaya Figueras, executive editor of Sauce Magazine.

Artwork by Bill Kohn / (Courtesy Bruno David Gallery)

A new exhibit featuring the work of the late St. Louis artist Bill Kohn opens tonight at the Bruno David Gallery. The exhibition is small in number, but large in scale, featuring five of Kohn's signature colorful works painted on big stretches of canvas.

"Bill was an amazing painter," said gallery owner Bruno David. "He traveled around the world many times over and made a lot of paintings during his travel, drawings, coming back to St. Louis every time. And some of the paintings that he made, he felt that they needed to be extremely large."

Paul Sableman / (Via Flickr/pasa47)

Over the past six decades, the Metro East has gained a nasty reputation for dangerous crime. The news headlines reflect a cycle of poverty and crime made worse by a lack of local resources for adequate governance.

Three government officials charged with tackling these problems joined us to discuss their vision for creating a more positive future for the Metro East: U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Illinois, Stephen Wigginton; State's Attorney for St. Clair County, Brendan Kelly; and the mayor of Washington Park, Ann Rodgers.

(Courtesy Bath & North East Somerset Council, UK)

Bestselling author Bill Bryson has covered a range of topics over the years. He wrote about science in  A Short History of Just About Everything. He detailed his travel through the Appalachian Trail in A Walk in the Woods. And he outlined the idiosyncrasies of the English language in Made in America.

In his latest offering, One Summer: America, 1927, Bryson maintains his signature humorous tone as he offers historical tidbits covering a four-month time span in American history.

(Via Flikr/Derringsdo)

Commissioners of the Zoo-Museum District, on September 30, voted to raise the property tax rate that funds five St. Louis cultural institutions to the highest level permitted by state law.  Those institutions are the St. Louis Zoo, the Missouri Botanical Garden, Saint Louis Art Museum, St. Louis Science Center and Missouri History Museum.

(via Wikimedia Commons/Noahudlis)

Updated at 9:30 a.m. on Wednesday, October 9, to correct errors in our interview.

In the next two months, the state of Missouri plans to use the drug propofol to perform two executions, despite opposition from the European Union, the Missouri Society of Anesthesiologists and the American Civil Liberties Union.

(Courtesy: Coolfire Originals)

Resale Royalty. Welcome to Sweetie Pies. Funeral Boss. Salvage City. If you are a fan of reality-based TV, these shows may be familiar to you.

All of them take place in St. Louis. And all of them were produced by St. Louis-based television production companies Coolfire Originals and NoCoast Originals, who often work in partnership to create what they call "unscripted" shows.

Two St. Louis organizations dedicated to combating alcoholism have teamed up to bring a play about Alcoholics Anonymous to the city.

"Pass It On: An Evening with Bill W. and Dr. Bob" is set in a 1948 meeting of Alcoholics Anonymous as the organization's two founders share their stories of recovery. The play will be performed on the campus of Logan University on Saturday, October 5, with proceeds benefiting NCADA St. Louis and Harris House.

(Courtesy Asian American Chamber of Commerce)

The Asian American Chamber of Commerce is a relatively recent addition to the St. Louis business scene. The organization's founders, Johnny Wang and Alexander Lee, created the chamber two years ago in the wake of efforts to create a China Hub at Lambert International Airport.

In the process of their work for the China Hub, Wang and Lee realized St. Louis didn't have an organization dedicated to promoting Asian American businesses and decided to form the Asian American Chamber of Commerce (AACC).

(Via Flickr/Boston Public Library)

In his new book This Town, self-described Washington insider Mark Leibovich paints an unattractive portrait of a capital focused on image, personal wealth and self-interest over public service.

(Courtesy Center for Investigative Reporting)

An investigation by the Center for Investigative Reporting has found that the Department of Veterans Affairs has increased the number of prescriptions for opiates by about 270 percent nationwide in the past twelve years.

While the number of prescriptions varies widely in different regions of the country, St. Louis reflects the national average with an approximate 300 percent increase, said the author of the article, Aaron Glantz.

(Via Flickr/Mandalit)

Hundreds of thousands of government employees went on furlough today, as the federal government began a partial shutdown. Thousands of those employees live and work in the St. Louis region. Meanwhile the debt ceiling deadline looms.

What kind of economic impact will the shutdown and debt ceiling have on the St. Louis region?

St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh spoke with economist Howard Wall, Colonel Kyle Kremer, Commander of the 375th Air Mobility Wing at Scott Air Force Base, and St. Louis Beacon reporter Jason Rosenbaum to find out.

(Via Flickr/Rosemary)

The online marketplace for health insurance – one of the major provisions of the federal Affordable Care Act – goes live Tuesday, October 1. With the hours winding down until enrollment begins, we wanted to provide a platform for your questions to be answered.

comedy nose | Flickr

Second Brief: For the Sake of All

The second of five briefs from a multi-disciplinary study on African-American health in St. Louis and St. Louis County was released last week. It details how health issues lead African American high schoolers in the region to drop out of school.

Cameron Wittig / (Courtesy Jazz St. Louis)

Jazz trio The Bad Plus is making an extra stop in St. Louis this year. In addition to their January performance at Jazz at the Bistro, the group will be in town September 30th through October 3rd as part of Jazz St. Louis' Residency Series.

Jazz enthusiasts will be able to hear The Bad Plus discuss their work at various events, as well as listen to them perform with members of the St. Louis Symphony.

 

Courtesy of Hettie Barnhill

Of the dancers who performed as part of the Muny Chorus in 1962, only one of them had their own security guard.

Jamie Heuer

Today's broadcast of an interview with Mo Rocca is an excerpt from an earlier interview. The initial interview was prempted by President Obama's speech on Syria.

With the new season of Rocca's cooking show starting next week, we took the opportunity to broadcast segments you might have missed earlier and highlight the details of the show.

Related Event

My Grandmother's Ravioli with Mo Rocca

Rich Herberts / St. Louis Public Radio

Every month, St. Louis on the Air holds a legal roundtable in which we discuss local, regional and national issues pertaining to the law.  This month, we took the show on the road to Saint Louis University's new downtown School of Law building.

Host Don Marsh and the panel of legal experts took questions from a live audience in the 12th floor court room. And with the new U.S. Supreme Court session scheduled to begin October 7th, there was a lot to talk about.

The panelists were:

Tara Pham / (Courtesy Potluck PAC)

For some time now, St. Louisans interested in funding creative projects in the region have gathered on the last Sunday of the month for Sloup. They put a donation in a pot, eat soup, listen to proposals, and vote on the one they'd most like to see happen. The proposal that wins the most votes gets to use the donated money to help make their idea a reality.

There is a consensus among scientists that global warming is occurring, and the increase in temperature is man-made. The U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is currently preparing a new report on the topic that is expected to include strongly worded warnings to reduce the world's consumption of fossil fuels.

Images courtesy Stih & Schnock © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

When Berlin-based conceptual artists Renata Stih and Frieder Schnock first visited St. Louis in 2002, they were surprised by how familiar the city felt to them.

"We were baffled by how German it is. How normal everything sounds and looks," said Stih. "It wasn’t New York, it wasn’t Chicago, for sure not LA, It was something like a nice, quiet, city with extraordinary town planning."

(Courtesy Fox Theatre)

The Broadway tour of "Chicago: The Musical" opens tonight at the Fox Theatre for a three-day run starring John O'Hurley as Billy Flynn and Paige Davis as Roxie Hart.

O'Hurley returns to St. Louis after performing in the role of King Arthur in the Muny's production of "Spamalot" in June. He played the role of J. Peterman on "Seinfeld" and was on the first season of "Dancing with the Stars."

Here's what O'Hurley had to say on a few topics:

On starting out his career in soap operas

(Image courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles) / (Courtesy Carlos and Rosa de la Cruz Collection, Miami. )

Although artist Rashid Johnson explores themes of identity and black history in his work, he does not see the exhibition of his work at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum to be an exploration of the black experience.

What it does show is the breadth of his work during the last fifteen years, in multiple mediums and with multiple layers of meaning.

What can a cat with more than a million likes on Facebook look forward to? Evidently, an endorsement deal with St. Louis-based Nestle Purina. Grumpy Cat may be the new face of Friskies, but she's not the type of feline to turn that frown upside down.

"At least in meme form, she's the grumpiest cat on the Internet," said Shawn Brain, brand manager for Friskies.

knittymarie / Flickr

With less than three months on the job, Normandy School District Superintendent Tyrone McNichols has a clear plan to regain accreditation from the state and a strong message about the help he needs to make that plan successful.

The main academic components of McNichols' plan involve a new literacy program in partnership with the University of Missouri-St. Louis and a new focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). As part of the focus on STEM, a new science program is being implemented through a partnership with Washington University.

Laurie Roberts Porter / (Courtesy Penguin Group)

Thirty-one years after bestselling author Sue Grafton introduced the world to the fictional private eye Kinsey Millhone in A is for Alibi, fans of her books still eagerly await the next book in the series. W is for Wasted was published earlier this month, marking the 23rd letter in the alphabet and the 23rd book in the series.

Courtesy Normandy School District

Normandy and Riverview Gardens School Districts are unaccredited. St. Louis Public Schools is only provisionally accredited. 

(Courtesy PBS)

According to the U.S. Census, the United States will become a majority-minority by the year 2043, with Latinos representing the largest portion of the population.

While this shift in demographics represents a major sea-change for the country, in a way it is also nothing more than a continuation of a long story: the 500 year history of Latino Americans.

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