Camille Phillips

News Producer and Weekend Newscaster

Camille Phillips began working for St. Louis Public Radio in July 2013 as the online producer for the talk shows. She grew up in southwest Missouri and has a Master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism, University of Missouri-Columbia.

Camille has also worked at public radio stations in Columbia, Mo. and Kansas City, Mo. As an intern for Harvest Public Media her work aired on KCUR, KBIA, NET Nebraska, Kansas Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio.

In her free time, Camille enjoys reading, dance, hiking and canoeing. She was drawn to journalism as a profession by a passion for hearing different perspectives and a desire to provide a platform for conversation.

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St. Louis on the Air
5:14 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

Journalism And The Public Trust: The Recurring Role Of Jayson Blair

Jayson Blair from the documentary "A Fragile Trust."
(Courtesy Cinema St. Louis)

The systematic plagiarism and fabrication of then-New York Times reporter Jayson Blair a decade ago represents one of the most flagrant and grievous breaks in journalistic trust in modern times. It was a black mark against one of the World's flagship newspapers when his deception was revealed, prompting a detailed retraction from the Times and internal restructuring within the organization.

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St. Louis on the Air
3:31 pm
Wed November 20, 2013

New Novel by 'Joy Luck Club' Author Amy Tan Explores Love And Abandonment

The picture of Amy Tan's grandmother that led Tan to wonder if her grandmother was a courtesan, circa 1910.
(Courtesy Amy Tan)

Recorded Saturday, November 16 at the St. Louis County Library.

Amy Tan, author of The Joy Luck Club and other novels centered on the mother-daughter relationship, visited St. Louis as part of a tour for her new book, The Valley of Amazement.

In front of an audience of several hundred fans, she spoke with St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh about the novel, her writing, her life, and her belief in ghosts.

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St. Louis on the Air
9:58 am
Tue November 19, 2013

The Lost Art Of Letter Writing, Or, How You Texted Your Mom In 1863

The first page of a letter written by Alfred S. Hartwell in 1864.
Credit (Missouri History Museum)

In the age of emails, texts and tweets, we take a look back to a time when the handwritten letter was the primary way people communicated across long distances.

In his book To the Letter: A Celebration of the Lost Art of Letter Writing, author Simon Garfield examines the role of letters throughout history – a role that now must adapt to current technology.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:31 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

March Of Dimes Turns Research Focus To Preventing Premature Birth

(via Flickr/Joshua Smith)

When Reggie Rideout's daughter Maya was born seven years ago, she weighed just 1 lb. 15 oz.

"I was aiming for a St. Patrick's baby and ended up with a Christmas baby," said Rideout. Her daughter was born at 27 weeks. “I was just so unprepared. And I’m a planner....All of a sudden, not only are you not pregnant anymore, but your baby is very sick.”

Despite Maya's tough start, she is doing well now. "She's a first-grader. She's healthy and intelligent. You would never look at her and know she was born actually a little over three months early," said Rideout.

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Cityscape
4:51 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Actress Susan Claassen Embodies Costume Designer Edith Head

Actress Susan Claassen in the role of costume designer Edith Head.
Tim Fuller

Actress Susan Claassen has had the same look for years. But it wasn't until she saw a show on Edith Head one night on the Biography channel that Claassen realized her appearance was very similar to costume designer Edith Head, whose Hollywood career spanned from 1923 to her death in 1981.

"She [Edith Head] really was an executive woman before there was such a thing," said Claassen. "It was a boy's club when she came in in 1923. And the films are as timeless as her designs."

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Cityscape
4:47 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Actor Stephen Lang Portrays Lives Of Eight Medal Of Honor Recipients In One-Man Play

Actor Stephen Lang.
(Courtesy Marleah Leslie & Associates)

In "Beyond Glory," actor and playwright Stephen Lang takes on the roles of eight men awarded the Medal of Honor, the country's highest military honor. The one-man play will be performed in St. Louis on Saturday, November 16 at Washington University's Edison Theatre.

Lang, whose credits include "Avatar," "Conan the Barbarian" and the Broadway production of "The Speed of Darkness," adapted the play from a book by the same name written by Larry Smith in 2003.

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St. Louis on the Air
5:20 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Advocacy, Transparency, Objectivity: A Debate On What Constitutes Ethical Political Reporting

Journalist Jeremy Scahill speaks to Blackwater protestors in 2008.
(Via Flickr/Richard O. Barry)

Should a journalist strive most to be fair and objective? Or should his or her primary goal be transparency? Can a content-producer be both an advocate and a journalist? What is the role of the press in the future of democracy and what should its journalistic ethics be?

These are questions news outlets and individual journalists alike must answer as they navigate the future of journalism in the United States, and the topic of discussion during the Second Annual Public Ethics Conference at the University of Missouri-St. Louis on Thursday, November 14.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:46 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

How Do We Foster Media Literacy In Today's Digital World?

(via Flickr/Jason Howie)

With the advent of smart phones and tablets, media messages are now ever-present. And with social media, Internet television, satellite radio, blogs and self-publishing in addition to traditional print and broadcasting, the number of media messages out there is also ever-increasing.

That makes it all the more important that people have the ability to critically deconstruct the messages the media convey.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:41 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

STL Village Provides Network For Aging St. Louisans Wanting To Stay In Their Own Homes

(via Flickr/natematias)

For the thousands of St. Louisans retiring and deciding how to live the latter years of their life, keeping their independence and living in the comfort of their own home is a primary concern.

That's where STL Village hopes to step in.

Part of the national Village to Village network, the goal of STL Village is to provide members with the services needed for them to stay in their own homes longer, as well as the social activities desired to help them stay connected.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:28 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

Hitting The Right Note: St. Louis Non-Profit Helps Veterans Heal Through Music

Dennis Reeves, Vietnam veteran and Six String Heroes instructor.
(Courtesy Six String Heroes)

For veterans struggling to adjust to civilian life, playing music can provide a means of focus and escape. That's the founding idea of Six String Heroes, a non-profit organization based at Jefferson Barracks. The organization connects St. Louis area veterans with guitar lessons as a means of music therapy.

After six lessons, veterans can earn a free guitar. So far, more than 170 guitars have been awarded.

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