Camille Phillips

News Producer and Weekend Newscaster

Camille Phillips began working for St. Louis Public Radio in July 2013 as the online producer for the talk shows. She grew up in southwest Missouri and has a Master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism, University of Missouri-Columbia.

Camille has also worked at public radio stations in Columbia, Mo. and Kansas City, Mo. As an intern for Harvest Public Media her work aired on KCUR, KBIA, NET Nebraska, Kansas Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio.

In her free time, Camille enjoys reading, dance, hiking and canoeing. She was drawn to journalism as a profession by a passion for hearing different perspectives and a desire to provide a platform for conversation.

Ways To Connect

comedy nose | Flickr

Second Brief: For the Sake of All

The second of five briefs from a multi-disciplinary study on African-American health in St. Louis and St. Louis County was released last week. It details how health issues lead African American high schoolers in the region to drop out of school.

Cameron Wittig / (Courtesy Jazz St. Louis)

Jazz trio The Bad Plus is making an extra stop in St. Louis this year. In addition to their January performance at Jazz at the Bistro, the group will be in town September 30th through October 3rd as part of Jazz St. Louis' Residency Series.

Jazz enthusiasts will be able to hear The Bad Plus discuss their work at various events, as well as listen to them perform with members of the St. Louis Symphony.


Courtesy of Hettie Barnhill

Of the dancers who performed as part of the Muny Chorus in 1962, only one of them had their own security guard.

Jamie Heuer

Today's broadcast of an interview with Mo Rocca is an excerpt from an earlier interview. The initial interview was prempted by President Obama's speech on Syria.

With the new season of Rocca's cooking show starting next week, we took the opportunity to broadcast segments you might have missed earlier and highlight the details of the show.

Related Event

My Grandmother's Ravioli with Mo Rocca

Rich Herberts / St. Louis Public Radio

Every month, St. Louis on the Air holds a legal roundtable in which we discuss local, regional and national issues pertaining to the law.  This month, we took the show on the road to Saint Louis University's new downtown School of Law building.

Host Don Marsh and the panel of legal experts took questions from a live audience in the 12th floor court room. And with the new U.S. Supreme Court session scheduled to begin October 7th, there was a lot to talk about.

The panelists were:

Tara Pham / (Courtesy Potluck PAC)

For some time now, St. Louisans interested in funding creative projects in the region have gathered on the last Sunday of the month for Sloup. They put a donation in a pot, eat soup, listen to proposals, and vote on the one they'd most like to see happen. The proposal that wins the most votes gets to use the donated money to help make their idea a reality.

There is a consensus among scientists that global warming is occurring, and the increase in temperature is man-made. The U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is currently preparing a new report on the topic that is expected to include strongly worded warnings to reduce the world's consumption of fossil fuels.

Images courtesy Stih & Schnock © 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

When Berlin-based conceptual artists Renata Stih and Frieder Schnock first visited St. Louis in 2002, they were surprised by how familiar the city felt to them.

"We were baffled by how German it is. How normal everything sounds and looks," said Stih. "It wasn’t New York, it wasn’t Chicago, for sure not LA, It was something like a nice, quiet, city with extraordinary town planning."

(Courtesy Fox Theatre)

The Broadway tour of "Chicago: The Musical" opens tonight at the Fox Theatre for a three-day run starring John O'Hurley as Billy Flynn and Paige Davis as Roxie Hart.

O'Hurley returns to St. Louis after performing in the role of King Arthur in the Muny's production of "Spamalot" in June. He played the role of J. Peterman on "Seinfeld" and was on the first season of "Dancing with the Stars."

Here's what O'Hurley had to say on a few topics:

On starting out his career in soap operas

(Image courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles) / (Courtesy Carlos and Rosa de la Cruz Collection, Miami. )

Although artist Rashid Johnson explores themes of identity and black history in his work, he does not see the exhibition of his work at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum to be an exploration of the black experience.

What it does show is the breadth of his work during the last fifteen years, in multiple mediums and with multiple layers of meaning.

What can a cat with more than a million likes on Facebook look forward to? Evidently, an endorsement deal with St. Louis-based Nestle Purina. Grumpy Cat may be the new face of Friskies, but she's not the type of feline to turn that frown upside down.

"At least in meme form, she's the grumpiest cat on the Internet," said Shawn Brain, brand manager for Friskies.

knittymarie / Flickr

With less than three months on the job, Normandy School District Superintendent Tyrone McNichols has a clear plan to regain accreditation from the state and a strong message about the help he needs to make that plan successful.

The main academic components of McNichols' plan involve a new literacy program in partnership with the University of Missouri-St. Louis and a new focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). As part of the focus on STEM, a new science program is being implemented through a partnership with Washington University.

Laurie Roberts Porter / (Courtesy Penguin Group)

Thirty-one years after bestselling author Sue Grafton introduced the world to the fictional private eye Kinsey Millhone in A is for Alibi, fans of her books still eagerly await the next book in the series. W is for Wasted was published earlier this month, marking the 23rd letter in the alphabet and the 23rd book in the series.

Courtesy Normandy School District

Normandy and Riverview Gardens School Districts are unaccredited. St. Louis Public Schools is only provisionally accredited. 

(Courtesy PBS)

According to the U.S. Census, the United States will become a majority-minority by the year 2043, with Latinos representing the largest portion of the population.

While this shift in demographics represents a major sea-change for the country, in a way it is also nothing more than a continuation of a long story: the 500 year history of Latino Americans.

Michelle Volansky / (Courtesy Sauce Magazine)

In our monthly Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine, host Steve Potter discussed new restaurants and bars opening up in St. Louis with Ligaya Figueras, executive editor of Sauce Magazine. Every month the magazine makes up a "hit list" of new venues the editors recommend visiting.

Jerry Naunheim, Jr. / (Courtesy Repertory Theatre of St. Louis)

The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis opens tonight with a revival of  the musical "Cabaret." First performed on Broadway in 1966, the musical is set in 1930s Berlin.

Because it captures the shift and change in power during pre-Nazi Germany, the show gives you more than entertainment. It also gives you something to think about, said Steve Wolff. He is the artistic director for the Repertory Theatre.

Zoe Scharf / (Courtesy STL Design Week 2013)

From darts to bike tours to artwork made out of old books, STL Design Week 2013 is all about looking at and talking about design in new and interesting ways.

"This is the third year for Design Week, and Design Week was started by AIGA, which are graphic artists," said Margaret McDonald. "And this year it encompasses architects, illustrators, interior designers, industrial designers."

McDonald is chairperson for STL Design Week 2013, and a principal at architecture and interior design firm Arcturus.

(Via Flikr/Kate Ter Haar)

When it comes to the economy, a rise in consumer spending is seen as an indicator of  better times ahead. But when it comes to the environment, increased consumer spending can have a downside.

"Consumption is a problem because that's really the root driver of our environmental problems," said Madalyn Coici, waste prevention specialist with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency.


The September 11 terrorist attacks were a tragedy unlike anything the United States had experienced. They set the nation on a new path and their ramifications, both big and small, are still felt today, twelve years on.

There are the obvious consequences: thousands of people who died that day, two wars, the Patriot Act, the creation of the Department of Homeland Security. And then there are the more subtle and pervasive ones: our mental state, how Muslims are perceived in America. Even our architecture has changed.