Camille Phillips

News Producer and Weekend Newscaster

Camille Phillips began working for St. Louis Public Radio in July 2013 as the online producer for the talk shows. She grew up in southwest Missouri and has a Master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism, University of Missouri-Columbia.

Camille has also worked at public radio stations in Columbia, Mo. and Kansas City, Mo. As an intern for Harvest Public Media her work aired on KCUR, KBIA, NET Nebraska, Kansas Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio.

In her free time, Camille enjoys reading, dance, hiking and canoeing. She was drawn to journalism as a profession by a passion for hearing different perspectives and a desire to provide a platform for conversation.

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St. Louis on the Air
11:15 am
Wed October 23, 2013

Remembering The 1946 World Series - The First Time The Cardinals Beat The Red Sox

1946 World Champion St. Louis Cardinals
(Via Wikimedia Commons)

A lot has changed in the world of baseball since 1946. But a familiar pair of elite teams are once again playing in the Fall Classic.  For the fourth time, the St. Louis Cardinals are facing off against the Boston Red Sox in the World Series. Previous matchups took place in 1946, 1967 and 2004.

And this year's matchup has some striking similarities to the team's first meeting in 1946. Then, as now, St. Louis Cardinals defeated the Dodgers in playoffs before facing off against the Red Sox.

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St. Louis on the Air
5:24 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

New Book Showcases History And Conservation Of Missouri River Valley

Trumpeter Swans have landed at the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers every year in October since 1991.
Danny Brown

In St. Louis, the Missouri River sometimes gets overshadowed by the Mighty Mississippi. But it has center stage in a new book. Missouri River Country: 100 Miles of Stories and Scenery from Hermann to the Confluence combines abundant photographs and the work of 60 authors to tell the story of the region.

"The Missouri is kind of out of sight out of mind a lot of times," said the editor of the book, Dan Burkhardt. "Often times when we do hear about it is when it misbehaves, when it floods." He compiled the book to highlight all the positives the river has to offer.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:23 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Mental Illness: How Do We Move From Stigma To Solutions?

(via Flickr/stevendepolo)

When mental illness hits the headlines, it's usually connected to mass shootings or suicides. The focus is on mental illness as the reason for a tragedy, and increases the stigma against an already misunderstood  condition, says Mike Keller, executive director of the Independence Center in the Central West End. According to Keller, that kind of negative media exposure has created a human rights emergency.

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St. Louis on the Air
5:37 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Legal Roundtable: Drones, Cyberbullying, Maryville Rape Case, Etc.

(via Flickr/James Cridland)

If all goes according to plan, a surveillance drone could be policing the skies of St. Louis by this time next year. According to SLMPD Chief Sam Dotson, the drone would be used in public spaces, and would enable the police to avoid dangerous high-speed chases. But what are the legal parameters? And what is considered public?

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Cityscape
5:54 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Opera Theatre Of Saint Louis Presents 'The Very Last Green Thing'

Opera Theatre of Saint Louis Presents 'The Very Last Green Thing'
Opera Theatre of Saint Louis

"The Very Last Green Thing," an opera aimed for young audiences and performed by children ranging from nine to 16, opens next week at the Touhill. It will be the third production of the work by Opera Theatre of Saint Louis since the organization commissioned it in 1992.

"The inspiration for the opera actually came from kids," said Allison Felter, director of education and community engagement at Opera Theatre of Saint Louis. "We wanted to know back then what was important to them, and it was the environment."

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Arts & Culture
5:01 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Steve Potter Eats Bugs As Science Center Opens Bug Exhibit

A tray of food prepared by Bug Chef Jayme Necaise.From the top left: meal worm salsa, banana cricket fritters, chocolate chirp cookies and wax worm fries.
Jeremy Bailey/St. Louis Public Radio

"Harry's Big Adventure: My Bug World" opens October 19th at the Saint Louis Science Center. As a tasty addition, every weekend the attraction will host bug chefs preparing sweet, salty and crunchy bug treats. Cityscape host Steve Potter previewed the exhibit with Bug Chef Jayme Necaise and sampled an array of those bug-filled snacks.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:38 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Tina Meier Reflects On Seventh Anniversary Of Daughter's Suicide, Cyberbullying Prevention Efforts

Megan Meier
(handout)

Today marks the seventh anniversary of the death of 13-year-old Megan Meier, a St. Charles County girl who killed herself after being the victim of online bullying.

This month, cyberbullying is again in the news for a tragic reason. A 12-year-old girl from Florida, Rebecca Sedwick, committed suicide in response to cruel messages she received on her phone.

"What breaks my heart, is not only just what that child [Rebecca Sedwick] was going through...but now also her family...and the entire ripple effect," said Tina Meier, mother of Megan.

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St. Louis on the Air
5:44 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

Starkloff Disability Institute Works To Overcome Obstacles To Hiring People With Disabilities

Colleen Starkloff

For Colleen Starkloff and her husband Max, advocating for people with disabilities has always been about helping them gain independence. When they founded Paraquad in St. Louis 45 years ago, their goal was to enable people with disabilities to live independently.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:51 pm
Tue October 15, 2013

Hunger Is On The Rise In Missouri. How Can We Reverse The Trend?

(via Flikr/NAVFAC)

According to a report released in September by the University of Missouri-Columbia, the percent of people who have inadequate access to food rose more in Missouri than in any other state in the nation from 2000 to 2010.

Approximately 1.3 million Missourians are currently classified as "food insecure." About 400,000 Missourians experience hunger.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:32 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

What Does A Grassroots Organization Need To Affect Change?

St. Louis fast food workers rally at the McDonald's on South Broadway as they demand better wages. July 29, 2013
Erin Williams / St. Louis Public Radio

To people who feel powerless in the face of today's political structure, Princeton University religion professor Jeffrey Stout has this advice: organize.  He delivers a lecture, "Struggle for a Just Society - Grassroots Democracy in America," as part of the Lee Institute's Speaker Series on Monday, October 28, 2013.

He points to the great social movements of the past two centuries as examples of grassroots organization that affected real change in America -  abolitionists, civil rights and women's suffrage.

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