Camille Phillips

News Producer and Weekend Newscaster

Camille Phillips began working for St. Louis Public Radio in July 2013 as the online producer for the talk shows. She grew up in southwest Missouri and has a Master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism, University of Missouri-Columbia.

Camille has also worked at public radio stations in Columbia, Mo. and Kansas City, Mo. As an intern for Harvest Public Media her work aired on KCUR, KBIA, NET Nebraska, Kansas Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio.

In her free time, Camille enjoys reading, dance, hiking and canoeing. She was drawn to journalism as a profession by a passion for hearing different perspectives and a desire to provide a platform for conversation.

Ways to Connect

James Cridland via Flickr

During next week's veto session, Missouri legislators will likely attempt to override Governor Jay Nixon's veto of the gun bill (H.B. 463), called the Second Amendment Preservation Act. Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster has announced that he agrees with Nixon's override, stating that the bill violates the Supremacy Clause of the constitution. If put into law, the bill would conflict with federal gun laws.

(via Flikr/Ed Uthman)

Just as with most things in life, when it comes to researching diseases, there is strength in numbers. Most funding goes to researching well-known and wide-spread diseases such as cancer and heart disease. 

As previously reported by St. Louis Public Radio, management of the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department officially returned to the purview of the City of St. Louis on Saturday.  After the at times contentious process to regain control, and a 152 year run under state management, the city can now look ahead to the impact local control will have on St. Louis.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

With the likelihood of a U.S. strike on Syria, some are saying the country may come under a terrorist attack in retaliation. What kind of attack could take place, and how ready is St. Louis to weather it?

Rebroadcast from June 13, 2012.

A conversation with Arthur Herman, author of Freedom's Forge: How American Business Produced Victory in World War II, about the contributions of American business during the second World War, with focus on St. Louis area businesses.  

(Courtesy Craft Alliance)

Starting tomorrow, Craft Alliance asks St. Louisans to answer the question, "What do you want to do before you die?"

It's part of an international art project called "Before I die..." in which the public is invited to write their hopes and dreams in chalk on a wall for all passing by to see. Hundreds of cities around the world have their own chalkboard wall. It was started in 2011 in New Orleans by Cindy Chang after she lost a loved one.

Jamie Heuer

Earlier this month, host Steve Potter caught up with Mo Rocca while he was in St. Louis working on a story for  "CBS Sunday Morning." Their discussion was ostensibly on how Rocca juggles his three professional roles, but in reality the topics covered were even more numerous than the many hats Mo Rocca wears.

Among the topics discussed were:

(Courtesy Square Inc.)

One of the hurdles small businesses face is the potential loss of a sale if they don't have the infrastructure in place to accept credit card and debit card payments.

St. Louis native Jack Dorsey, CEO of Square Inc., a mobile payments device company, makes that hurdle easier to jump but he says the company has more to offer than concrete tools of the trade.

(via Wikimedia Commons / U.S. National Archives and Records Administration)

In the summer of 1963, hundreds of thousands across the nation converged on Washington, D.C. to march for jobs and freedom.

Meanwhile, back in St. Louis, local civil rights activists were gearing up for a demonstration of their own: a picket line and sit-in at Jefferson Bank, also calling for equal employment for African Americans. Despite being located in an African American neighborhood, the only African Americans employed by the bank worked as janitors.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

In the summer of 1993, flood waters from the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers broke levee after levee in the St. Louis region, covering large swathes of land, destroying property, disrupting lives and creating hazardous conditions.

KWMU Staff

The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) released its Annual Performance Report for Missouri school districts last week. It is the first year in which schools were assessed under new standards. The results disappointed many local leaders and leave plenty of room for improvement for a number of St. Louis area schools, including St. Louis Public Schools.

(Courtesy HEARding Cats Collective)

In keeping with the mission to "keep St. Louis strange and wonderful," the HEARding Cats Collective is holding an underwater concert at the Webster University Student Center's Pool next Saturday.

Rich O'Donnell, artistic director of the HEARding Cats Collective, said the idea for an underwater concert came to him from floating in rivers and lakes," seeing through the lens of the water, seeing as the fish see."

"When you're in the water, you're completely focused on your senses," O'Donnell added. And the concert will give the audience plenty for their senses to experience.

Brickstreet Design in Alton, IL

Plans are in motion to erect a bronze statue of jazz musician Miles Davis at his birthplace in Alton, Ill.  The city council of Alton gave its approval in July, and sculptor Preston Jackson has been commissioned to build the statue.

Jackson's design was selected out of a pool of ten. A professor emeritus from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Jackson is also a musician and lover of jazz music.

(Courtesy United Designs International Biennial Design Exhibition)

Posters are designed to be functional, usually to get a message out quickly. This often means they are here today and gone tomorrow. But an exhibit currently on display at the University of Missouri - St. Louis gives a little more longevity and exposure to the art form by displaying 100 posters by graphic designers from 40 countries.

(via Flickr/SenatorMcCaskill)

U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri says one of her priorities when Congress reconvenes in September is to approve legislation reducing sexual assaults in the military.  While McCaskill explained accomplishing the task is a team effort, she said there is one primary disagreement with her fellow Democratic colleagues.          

U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillebrand from New York wants to take prosecuting decisions away from commanders while McCaskill, on the other hand, wants it to be handled through the chain of command, with more accountability.

(Courtesy Collection of The New-York Historical Society)

As the author of the Declaration of Independence and the third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson is seen as a champion of liberty. Yet during his lifetime he owned more than 600 slaves and at the time of his death, more than 130 slaves were sold to pay off his debts.

An exhibit currently on display at the Missouri History Museum elaborates on this paradox.

(Courtesy Missouri History Museum Collections)

In recognition of the 250th anniversary of St. Louis, the Missouri History Museum is compiling an exhibit called "250 in 250," highlighting 50 people, 50 places, 50 images, 50 moments and 50 objects.

"I suppose the easiest thing for us to do would have been to do an exhibit on the city's founding," said Jody Sowell, director of exhibitions and research at the Missouri History Museum. "But we really wanted to come up with something that would cover that whole span of time, and really show the richness, diversity and complexity of that history."

(Courtesy: Homeyer Precision Manufacturing)

The Workforce Solutions Group at St. Louis Community College released its fifth annual State of the St. Louis Workforce Report earlier this month. The report is a compilation of data from 1,200 employers and surveys of more than 180 students.

The Executive Summary states:

(via Flickr/KurtClark)

During World War II, it was called shell shock. During the Vietnam War it was called the Vietnam Syndrome. It wasn't until 1980 that psychologists had an official term for the condition: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

With the recognition of PTSD as a psychological condition, large-scale studies of the disorder began, said  Dr. Rumi Kato Price, professor of psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine.

"Now we have very well established evidence-based treatments for PTSD," said Price. "That took three decades (to develop)."

(via Flikr/ Sgt. Dajon Schafer, Minnesota National Guard Public Affairs)

For Captain Michelle Matthews, readjusting to home was more difficult than adjusting to war. A reservist with previous active duty experience, Matthews was deployed with the Missouri National Guard to Iraq in December of 2005.

"Life was a lot easier at war in some aspects," said Matthews. "I didn't have to cook, get gas, pay bills. But we were at war."

"We were mortared every day," she added. She described a joke about hearing mortars. If you could hear them, you were good. If you couldn't hear them, then you were in trouble.

David Robertson conducting at Powell Hall
Dan Dreyfus | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Symphony Music Director David Robertson discussed American symphonies in a feature produced by NPR Music's Tom Huizenga as part of the program's search for the great American symphony. Robertson weighed in on why American orchestras are afraid of new symphonies in addition to explaining his selection of the great American symphony. St. Louis Public Radio also listeners made suggestions including:

Alex Heuer/St. Louis Public Radio

Who needs cookbooks when you can look up recipes online? The answer, perhaps, is people who care about more than just finding a recipe.

In our monthly Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine, substitute host Jim Althoff received recommendations for summer food reads from Executive Director Ligaya Figueras and Arts Director Meera Nagarajan of Sauce Magazine.

(Courtesy University City Children's Center)

The eighth annual concert to benefit the tuition assistance program at University City Children's Center will be held next Saturday at Powell Hall. Melissa Brooks, Associate Principal Cellist with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, pianist Ruth Price with the St. Louis Children's Choirs and pianist Catherine Kautsky, Professor of Music at the Lawrence University Conservatory of Music will all be performing.

The program is titled "Fairy Tales Do Come True," but it is not a concert aimed specifically for children.

Charlie Miller, this time hacking into the steering wheel of a Ford Escape.
(Courtesy Charlie Miller)

There’s tech in your car and tech in your phone. Internet connections in your Xbox and your printer. Convenient. But also a potential conduit to breach your security.

A person with the know-how can even remotely hack into your steering wheel. With his research partner Chris Xavier, Charlie Miller of Wildwood, Mo. recently revealed this vulnerability in cars as part of an enterprise in what he calls "white hat" or "ethical" hacking.

Deborah Copaken Kogan / Courtesy Simon & Schuster

American involvement in the war in Afghanistan is winding down with no real victory in sight. In the midst of the war a new program called the Human Terrain System was introduced, intended to aid soldiers on the ground by helping them understand the cultural nuances of the Afghan and Iraqi people. The program  had good intentions but fatal flaws, said journalist and author Vanessa Gezari.