Camille Phillips

News Producer and Weekend Newscaster

Camille Phillips began working for St. Louis Public Radio in July 2013 as the online producer for the talk shows. She grew up in southwest Missouri and has a Master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism, University of Missouri-Columbia.

Camille has also worked at public radio stations in Columbia, Mo. and Kansas City, Mo. As an intern for Harvest Public Media her work aired on KCUR, KBIA, NET Nebraska, Kansas Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio.

In her free time, Camille enjoys reading, dance, hiking and canoeing. She was drawn to journalism as a profession by a passion for hearing different perspectives and a desire to provide a platform for conversation.

Ways To Connect

(Courtesy HEARding Cats Collective)

In keeping with the mission to "keep St. Louis strange and wonderful," the HEARding Cats Collective is holding an underwater concert at the Webster University Student Center's Pool next Saturday.

Rich O'Donnell, artistic director of the HEARding Cats Collective, said the idea for an underwater concert came to him from floating in rivers and lakes," seeing through the lens of the water, seeing as the fish see."

"When you're in the water, you're completely focused on your senses," O'Donnell added. And the concert will give the audience plenty for their senses to experience.

Brickstreet Design in Alton, IL

Plans are in motion to erect a bronze statue of jazz musician Miles Davis at his birthplace in Alton, Ill.  The city council of Alton gave its approval in July, and sculptor Preston Jackson has been commissioned to build the statue.

Jackson's design was selected out of a pool of ten. A professor emeritus from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Jackson is also a musician and lover of jazz music.

(Courtesy United Designs International Biennial Design Exhibition)

Posters are designed to be functional, usually to get a message out quickly. This often means they are here today and gone tomorrow. But an exhibit currently on display at the University of Missouri - St. Louis gives a little more longevity and exposure to the art form by displaying 100 posters by graphic designers from 40 countries.

(via Flickr/SenatorMcCaskill)

U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri says one of her priorities when Congress reconvenes in September is to approve legislation reducing sexual assaults in the military.  While McCaskill explained accomplishing the task is a team effort, she said there is one primary disagreement with her fellow Democratic colleagues.          

U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillebrand from New York wants to take prosecuting decisions away from commanders while McCaskill, on the other hand, wants it to be handled through the chain of command, with more accountability.

(Courtesy Collection of The New-York Historical Society)

As the author of the Declaration of Independence and the third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson is seen as a champion of liberty. Yet during his lifetime he owned more than 600 slaves and at the time of his death, more than 130 slaves were sold to pay off his debts.

An exhibit currently on display at the Missouri History Museum elaborates on this paradox.

(Courtesy Missouri History Museum Collections)

In recognition of the 250th anniversary of St. Louis, the Missouri History Museum is compiling an exhibit called "250 in 250," highlighting 50 people, 50 places, 50 images, 50 moments and 50 objects.

"I suppose the easiest thing for us to do would have been to do an exhibit on the city's founding," said Jody Sowell, director of exhibitions and research at the Missouri History Museum. "But we really wanted to come up with something that would cover that whole span of time, and really show the richness, diversity and complexity of that history."

(Courtesy: Homeyer Precision Manufacturing)

The Workforce Solutions Group at St. Louis Community College released its fifth annual State of the St. Louis Workforce Report earlier this month. The report is a compilation of data from 1,200 employers and surveys of more than 180 students.

The Executive Summary states:

(via Flickr/KurtClark)

During World War II, it was called shell shock. During the Vietnam War it was called the Vietnam Syndrome. It wasn't until 1980 that psychologists had an official term for the condition: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

With the recognition of PTSD as a psychological condition, large-scale studies of the disorder began, said  Dr. Rumi Kato Price, professor of psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine.

"Now we have very well established evidence-based treatments for PTSD," said Price. "That took three decades (to develop)."

(via Flikr/ Sgt. Dajon Schafer, Minnesota National Guard Public Affairs)

For Captain Michelle Matthews, readjusting to home was more difficult than adjusting to war. A reservist with previous active duty experience, Matthews was deployed with the Missouri National Guard to Iraq in December of 2005.

"Life was a lot easier at war in some aspects," said Matthews. "I didn't have to cook, get gas, pay bills. But we were at war."

"We were mortared every day," she added. She described a joke about hearing mortars. If you could hear them, you were good. If you couldn't hear them, then you were in trouble.

David Robertson conducting at Powell Hall
Dan Dreyfus / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Symphony Music Director David Robertson discussed American symphonies in a feature produced by NPR Music's Tom Huizenga as part of the program's search for the great American symphony. Robertson weighed in on why American orchestras are afraid of new symphonies in addition to explaining his selection of the great American symphony. St. Louis Public Radio also listeners made suggestions including:

Alex Heuer/St. Louis Public Radio

Who needs cookbooks when you can look up recipes online? The answer, perhaps, is people who care about more than just finding a recipe.

In our monthly Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine, substitute host Jim Althoff received recommendations for summer food reads from Executive Director Ligaya Figueras and Arts Director Meera Nagarajan of Sauce Magazine.

(Courtesy University City Children's Center)

The eighth annual concert to benefit the tuition assistance program at University City Children's Center will be held next Saturday at Powell Hall. Melissa Brooks, Associate Principal Cellist with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, pianist Ruth Price with the St. Louis Children's Choirs and pianist Catherine Kautsky, Professor of Music at the Lawrence University Conservatory of Music will all be performing.

The program is titled "Fairy Tales Do Come True," but it is not a concert aimed specifically for children.

Charlie Miller, this time hacking into the steering wheel of a Ford Escape.
(Courtesy Charlie Miller)

There’s tech in your car and tech in your phone. Internet connections in your Xbox and your printer. Convenient. But also a potential conduit to breach your security.

A person with the know-how can even remotely hack into your steering wheel. With his research partner Chris Xavier, Charlie Miller of Wildwood, Mo. recently revealed this vulnerability in cars as part of an enterprise in what he calls "white hat" or "ethical" hacking.

Deborah Copaken Kogan / Courtesy Simon & Schuster

American involvement in the war in Afghanistan is winding down with no real victory in sight. In the midst of the war a new program called the Human Terrain System was introduced, intended to aid soldiers on the ground by helping them understand the cultural nuances of the Afghan and Iraqi people. The program  had good intentions but fatal flaws, said journalist and author Vanessa Gezari.

(Courtesy Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis)

The Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis has a rich history in the region, with roots that stretch back 95 years. For the past 28 years, the organization has been led by James Buford, who retired as CEO at the end of May.

Former alderman and City License Collector Michael McMillan became the new CEO of the Urban League  last week. St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh sat down with McMillan to discuss what's next for the organization.

Although McMillan is new to the role of CEO, he is not new to the Urban League. He has been a member since he was sixteen.

(via Flikr/Stephen Bowler)

It's not easy to adjust to a new time zone or work schedule. Our body has a natural sleep/wake cycle and disruptions to it can lead to more than just feeling tired or exhausted.

Washington University professors Paul Gray and Erik Herzog are studying the biology behind our daily internal clock, or circadian rhythm. Sometimes referred to as the body or biological clock, Herzog defined it as "the entity within the body that synchronizes with an environmental cycle." This is not to be confused with the biological clock some refer to when thinking of a woman's desire to conceive. 

(Courtesy Union Avenue Opera)

When one thinks of Wagner’s Ring cycle, what comes to mind is a huge cast, orchestra and set which can only be performed in the world’s largest opera houses.  But Union Avenue Opera has brought the Ring to St. Louis thanks to the reduction and adaptation by composer Jonathan Dove and stage director Graham Vick. The company will mount the second opera, Die Walkure, on August 16, 17, 23 and 24.

(Courtesy Max and Louie Productions)

Most dramas centered on death and dying are tragedies. But not Nicky Silver's "The Lyons." Instead, it is a dark comedy that finds humor in the death of a family's patriarch. 

"A death in the family doesn't automatically bring out the best in people, but it brings out the best in Nicky Silver's writing," said Stellie Siteman, actress and artistic director of Max and Louie Productions.

The theater company opens a staging of "The Lyons" next Friday at COCA's Black Box. The play contains obscenities and is best for an adult audience.

(via Flickr/Abby Gillardi)

Bob Reuter, St. Louis musician and long-time host of Bob's Scratchy Records on community radio station KDHX died in a tragic accident last week. He was 61.

We remember Bob's life, music and legacy through highlights of two previous interviews with Reuter: a 2010 Sound Portrait by Mike Schrand and a 2013 Arch City Radio Hour interview with Nick Garcia

(via Flickr/marcn)

The United States Senate has 20 women in office, a mark never before reached prior to the last election. The top political seats in New Hampshire are all held by women: a female governor, two women in the U.S. Senate and women in both of the state's U.S. House seats.

Former Secretary of State and First Lady Hillary Clinton ran for president in 2008 and there is talk of her running again in 2016. Are these signs that America could soon have a woman break the last glass ceiling to executive power or are there still obstacles in the way?

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