Camille Phillips

News Producer and Weekend Newscaster

Camille Phillips began working for St. Louis Public Radio in July 2013 as the online producer for the talk shows. She grew up in southwest Missouri and has a Master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism, University of Missouri-Columbia.

Camille has also worked at public radio stations in Columbia, Mo. and Kansas City, Mo. As an intern for Harvest Public Media her work aired on KCUR, KBIA, NET Nebraska, Kansas Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio.

In her free time, Camille enjoys reading, dance, hiking and canoeing. She was drawn to journalism as a profession by a passion for hearing different perspectives and a desire to provide a platform for conversation.

Ways To Connect

(via Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Earlier this year, the American Medical Association voted to re-classify obesity as a disease rather than a condition. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one-third of adults in the United States are obese. Combine those two facts, and it can now be said that one in three Americans are ill, all with the same disease.

(Courtesy Jazz St. Louis)

This Saturday, Grand Center, Inc. and Jazz St. Louis team up to present a showcase of American music.  The event will take place at five venues in Grand Center and will feature performances by six local bands.

When they first started planning the event, they were going to present music across a wide range of genres, said Devin Rodino, communications and operations manager at Jazz St. Louis. But in the end they settled on American music --jazz, folk, blues, country and bluegrass.

(via Flikr/FallenPegasus)

Have you ever heard the story of the grandma who sees a young man in Dierberg's and says he reminds her of her dead grandson, then uses his sympathy to trick him into paying for her groceries? What about the the phrase "you know you're from St. Louis when Velveeta is your favorite kind of cheese?" If so, then you have an idea of the content of John Oldani's books.

Jerry Tovo (Courtesy Missouri History Museum)

 During the Vietnam War, Jerry Tovo was a drill sergeant, training soldiers to go to war. After he left the military, Tovo became a professional photographer, specializing in advertising. But in 2011, he took his photography in a less commercial direction--photographing homeless veterans across the country.

Tovo's motivation for the project originated with an understanding of the problems that can lead to homelessness  among veterans.

(St. Louis Metropolitan Police Dept.)

St. Louis City is currently ranked as the fourth most dangerous city in the nation by CQ Press, based on FBI reports of the number of crimes committed in 2011. But according to St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department Chief Sam Dotson and University of Missouri-St. Louis criminology professor Richard Rosenfeld, those numbers fail to tell the whole story.

St. Louis Public Radio

Twenty years ago today, Metro St. Louis slid open the doors for the first ride on its new light rail system. Although the system was built on an existing freight line, the path to its existence was not clear or easy.

"Until the very day that it opened, people did not believe this system was going to exist," said Les Sterman, supervisor of the Southern Illinois Flood Prevention District and former executive director of the East-West Gateway Council of Governments. He worked for years to make the MetroLink a reality.

(Courtesy University City Public Library Archives)

When Edward Gardner Lewis purchased the land that would become University City at the turn of the twentieth century, there wasn't much in the area beyond an amusement park, a race track and the loop of the trolley from which Delmar Loop gets its name. But he had a vision for a magazine empire and needed space to expand his printing presses. He built an iconic octagonal building for his headquarters overlooking the street car line and in view of the site of the upcoming 1904 World's Fair. From there, a bustling street of businesses grew, full of places to eat, shop and have a good time.

(via Flickr/mike matney)

Florida's Stand Your Ground law has been the subject of much debate in the wake of the Trayvon Martin case. Missouri has a similar law on the books called the Castle Doctrine, which gives an individual greater protection under the law when located on his or her property.

Over the course of the next two weeks, Cinema St. Louis will hold filmmaking workshops and screen fourteen films in its first St. Louis International Children's Film Festival.

Cinema St. Louis Executive Director Cliff Froehlich said the organization chose to do a children's festival because there were a lot of great children's films that should be seen despite not having wide commercial appeal. 

(Courtesy Robert L. Reed Tap Heritage Institute)

After a week of workshops led by professional tap dancers, the St. Louis Tap Festival will present "All That Tap XXII" on Saturday, July 27, 2013.

 

The second annual St. Louis Cabaret Festival begins Wednesday, July 31, 2013. Marilyn Maye, Billy Stritch, Jason Graae and John Bucchino are the festival headliners.

Marilyn Maye is a legendary cabaret singer who has performed on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson a record 76 times. She joined Billy Stritch, a singer, songwriter and pianist who often performs with Liza Minnelli and the Cabaret Project's Executive Director, Tim Schall, to talk about the upcoming festival with Cityscape host Steve Potter.

(Courtesy Lemp Mansion)

The open road. Curving, meandering highways. Roadside diners and trips to remember yesteryear. These are the types of images most often associated with Route 66.

But in addition to tourists and explorers, some unsavory characters have lived and traveled along the roads that became Missouri's Route 66. Author Lisa Livingston-Martin tells their stories in her new book, Missouri's Wicked Route 66: Outlaws and Gangsters on the Mother Road.

(via Flickr/katerha)

During the State of the Union Address in February, President Obama announced a plan for "Preschool for All," which would provide federal funding to states to expand early childhood education. On a recent trip to St. Louis, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan reiterated that early childhood education is a priority for the president.

(via Flickr/Jennifer Boriss)

Sign-up for major provisions of the Affordable Care Act, also known as ObamaCare, begins October 1st.

With less than three months before marketplace exchanges for health insurance go online, many questions remain about who is eligible, what the requirements are and what kind of penalties people and businesses may face if they or their employees continue to be uninsured come January 2014.

Peter Wochniak

Legally Blonde, The Musical opens tonight at the Robert G. Reim Theatre, continuing Stages St. Louis' 27th season.

Michelle London plays Elle Woods, a southern California girl who decides to "get serious" and follow her college boyfriend to Harvard Law. Ben Nordstrom returned to St. Louis to play Emmett Forrest. They talked with host Steve Potter to discuss the judgments we make based on people's clothes, defying expectations and their roles in the musical.

Legally Blonde, The Musical opens tonight, Friday July 19 and runs through August 18, 2013.

Greg Rannells, Sauce Magazine

In our monthly Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine, host Steve Potter sampled a few summer drinks with Cory King, Ted Kilgore and Ligaya Figueras, executive editor of Sauce Magazine.

(Courtesy: Crafting a Nation)

A new feature-length documentary proposes an interesting driver for the economy: craft beer.  Crafting a Nationsaid director Thomas Kolicko, "is about pursuing a dream, with beer as the vehicle that drives it."

Kolicko described crafting beer as an inefficient task, which in turn creates jobs. The film takes the audience to craft breweries in eight different states and thirteen different regions.

(Photo Courtesy: Neighborhood Houses)

When settlement houses were founded in the United States in the late 19th century, the idea was for educated middle-class or upper-class individuals to settle in impoverished areas, and through their influence and resources help lift their neighbors out of poverty.

Perhaps the most famous American Settlement House was Chicago's  Hull House, founded by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Star in 1889.

(via Flickr/espensorvik)

Employment in the field of information security, web development and computer networks—cybersecurity—is expected to increase 22 percent by 2020, according to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics. Washington University and Fontbonne University are offering new cybersecurity programs this Fall in response to the growing demand in the workforce for people in this field. 

(Courtesy: USTRANSCOM)

Cybersecurity is especially vital to the nation's military. Last year U.S. Transportation Command at Scott Air Force Base formed the Joint Cyber Center "in recognition of cyberspace as a warfighting domain. "

Colonel Tom Clancy is Chief of the Joint Cyber Center at Scott Air Force Base. He said that during routine sweeps in 2011, more than 44,000 "attempted accesses to systems" at U.S. Transportation Command were discovered. That number quadrupled in 2012.  

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