Camille Phillips

News Producer and Weekend Newscaster

Camille Phillips began working for St. Louis Public Radio in July 2013 as the online producer for the talk shows. She grew up in southwest Missouri and has a Master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism, University of Missouri-Columbia.

Camille has also worked at public radio stations in Columbia, Mo. and Kansas City, Mo. As an intern for Harvest Public Media her work aired on KCUR, KBIA, NET Nebraska, Kansas Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio.

In her free time, Camille enjoys reading, dance, hiking and canoeing. She was drawn to journalism as a profession by a passion for hearing different perspectives and a desire to provide a platform for conversation.

Ways To Connect

The Salvation Army band plays in an alcove of the newly renovated apartment building on Washington Ave. on Friday, February 27, 2015.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Another St. Louis agency is expanding its capacity to provide a long-term solution to homelessness in the region.

The Salvation Army has converted a dormitory-style building on Washington Ave. into 58 one-bedroom apartments. The apartments are slated for people with a variety of needs, including children aging out of foster care, people with disabilities and the chronically homeless.

social security card corner
file photo (Kelsey Proud/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated March 12, 2015 with a response from I Am My Sister’s Keeper

According to the woman behind I Am My Sister’s Keeper, Bella Beaudreux, the organization is not a scam.

“I got into this because I just wanted to help women who were in trouble,” Beaudreux said. “I never gave anybody information that wasn’t true. I said this is where we are and this is where we want to go.”

Beaudreux first said that individuals applying for jobs filled in their social security number as part of the application. When pressed about the fact that most employers don’t collect social security numbers until the first day of work in order to fill out tax paperwork, Beaudreux paused and then said that maybe her applications didn’t ask for social security numbers after all.

“Then maybe I’m wrong then,” Beaudreux said. “My mind is boggled right now. But I know this: I did nothing wrong. I never even looked at the information.”

Beaudreux said that anyone who filled out an application is welcome to come and pick it up or request that it be shredded. She said that she still feels called to help women who have been abused but doesn’t know whether the safe house will become a reality anytime soon.

“Maybe it won’t be tomorrow; maybe it won’t be a year from now. But I won’t give up,” Beaudreux said.

Beaudreux said she has not collected donations from anyone and never promised payment for attending meetings.

She also said that she is not responsible for the I Am My Sister’s Keeper website incorrectly stating that it was a member of the United Way because she did not build the website. The website has since been taken down.  

Original story:

An organization claiming to be opening a safe house for abused women in St. Louis may be a scam. The Better Business Bureau of St. Louis issued a warning Wednesday about “I Am My Sister’s Keeper.”

U.S. Civil Rights Commission discusses Ferguson in St. Louis
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri committee that keeps an eye on civil rights violations is the latest body to wade into the discussion about improving police-community relations after the August 2014 death of Michael Brown.

The 12-member Missouri Advisory Committee heard a full day of testimony from academics, law enforcement and community leaders. The committee's chairman, S. David Mitchell, said two public comment periods were the most important part. 

National Urban League Young Professional President Brandi Richard encourages a group of teenage girls to be supportive in their comments to each other.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Mutual respect. Mentorship. Giving back. Knowing your rights and the best way to act on them. These are a few of the solutions decided on during a town hall in St. Louis on Saturday seeking ways to improve social justice outcomes for African Americans.

(via Flickr/Michael Velardo)

There’s a new collaborative effort underway to slow down the St. Louis region’s heroin epidemic.

Spearheaded by the St. Louis chapter of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, the plan focuses on using innovative ways to increase awareness about the problem while partnering with legislators, law enforcement and doctors to save lives and reduce access to opiates—both heroin and prescription painkillers.

New Life Evangelistic Center, 1411 Locust St. in downtown St. Louis.
via Flickr | pasa 47.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay announced plans to fund year-round emergency shelter for 225 people Wednesday. The announcement came one day after the city’s Board of Public Service officially filed an order requiring downtown shelter New Life Evangelistic Center to reduce the number of people it helps each night to 32. New Life has until May 12 to comply or be shut down.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis area road crews are preparing for the first real snow storm of the year. The forecast is calling for four to eight inches to fall overnight, with another one to three inches expected on Monday.

According to Maggie Crane, spokeswoman for St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, the St. Louis Streets Department began treating roads with brine Saturday and they were putting down another layer Sunday. Crane said snow plow crews are working 12-hour shifts.

When copper piping like this is stolen, it can be costly to replace.
via Flickr/nectarous

Illinois Rep. Jay Hoffman, D-Swansea, has introduced a bill to form a task force of metal theft experts. Together they would work to find long-term solutions. He introduced a similar bill last year that passed in the House but not the Senate.

Hoffman said he is sponsoring the bill because of an increase in metal theft recently in the Metro East — everything from copper lines on utility poles to air conditioner coils and carburetors.

Monica Johnson (left) and Kimberly St. Clair lead a job training session for Ferguson 1000 Jobs on Saturday, February 14, 2015.
Camille Phillips | St.Louis Public Radio

One of the organizations formed to help Ferguson and the surrounding north St. Louis County region after the death of Michael Brown is gearing up for its first so-called “hiring event.”

Ferguson 1000 Jobs held a job training session Saturday at Ferguson Heights Church of Christ in preparation for the hiring event on February 28. During the training they discussed resume writing and practiced mock interviews.

St. Louis Metropolitan Police Chief Sam Dotson explains public safety protocol for the parade as Mardi Gras Foundation President Mack Bradley looks on.
Camille Phillips | St.Louis Public Radio

The historic Soulard neighborhood in south St. Louis is gearing up for its annual Mardi Gras parade this Saturday. Thousands of people are expected to line the streets for a view of the Valentine-themed floats.

According to Mardi Gras Foundation president Mack Bradley, Mardi Gras festivities add about $23 million to the regional economy.

The forecast calls for chilly temperatures this weekend, but Bradley said he’s not concerned about the cold keeping people away.

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