Camille Phillips

News Producer and Weekend Newscaster

Camille Phillips began working for St. Louis Public Radio in July 2013 as the online producer for the talk shows. She grew up in southwest Missouri and has a Master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism, University of Missouri-Columbia.

Camille has also worked at public radio stations in Columbia, Mo. and Kansas City, Mo. As an intern for Harvest Public Media her work aired on KCUR, KBIA, NET Nebraska, Kansas Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio.

In her free time, Camille enjoys reading, dance, hiking and canoeing. She was drawn to journalism as a profession by a passion for hearing different perspectives and a desire to provide a platform for conversation.

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St. Louis on the Air
5:11 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Discussion: What Do New Scores Mean For The Future Of St. Louis Area Schools?

Townsend Elementary School students in class.
/ KWMU Staff

The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) released its Annual Performance Report for Missouri school districts last week. It is the first year in which schools were assessed under new standards. The results disappointed many local leaders and leave plenty of room for improvement for a number of St. Louis area schools, including St. Louis Public Schools.

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Cityscape
5:56 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Underwater Concert 'AQurld Waves' Promises Unique, Multi-Sensory Experience

Artwork by Van McElwee for 'AQurld Waves'
(Courtesy HEARding Cats Collective)

In keeping with the mission to "keep St. Louis strange and wonderful," the HEARding Cats Collective is holding an underwater concert at the Webster University Student Center's Pool next Saturday.

Rich O'Donnell, artistic director of the HEARding Cats Collective, said the idea for an underwater concert came to him from floating in rivers and lakes," seeing through the lens of the water, seeing as the fish see."

"When you're in the water, you're completely focused on your senses," O'Donnell added. And the concert will give the audience plenty for their senses to experience.

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Cityscape
5:46 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Efforts Underway To Erect Statue Of Miles Davis In Alton

Rendering of Miles Davis Memorial Project by Barry Moyer and Mick Monahan
Brickstreet Design in Alton, IL

Plans are in motion to erect a bronze statue of jazz musician Miles Davis at his birthplace in Alton, Ill.  The city council of Alton gave its approval in July, and sculptor Preston Jackson has been commissioned to build the statue.

Jackson's design was selected out of a pool of ten. A professor emeritus from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Jackson is also a musician and lover of jazz music.

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Cityscape
5:10 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

UMSL Presents International Poster Art Exhibition

"Black Leopard" by Lanny Sommese
(Courtesy United Designs International Biennial Design Exhibition)

Posters are designed to be functional, usually to get a message out quickly. This often means they are here today and gone tomorrow. But an exhibit currently on display at the University of Missouri - St. Louis gives a little more longevity and exposure to the art form by displaying 100 posters by graphic designers from 40 countries.

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St. Louis on the Air
5:25 pm
Thu August 22, 2013

Senator McCaskill: 'Sexual Assault Reform In Military Before End Of Year'

U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri.
(via Flickr/SenatorMcCaskill)

U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri says one of her priorities when Congress reconvenes in September is to approve legislation reducing sexual assaults in the military.  While McCaskill explained accomplishing the task is a team effort, she said there is one primary disagreement with her fellow Democratic colleagues.          

U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillebrand from New York wants to take prosecuting decisions away from commanders while McCaskill, on the other hand, wants it to be handled through the chain of command, with more accountability.

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St. Louis on the Air
3:50 pm
Thu August 22, 2013

Thomas Jefferson: Founding Father, Champion Of Liberty & Owner Of Slaves

Thomas Jefferson by Rembrandt Peale, 1805
(Courtesy Collection of The New-York Historical Society)

As the author of the Declaration of Independence and the third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson is seen as a champion of liberty. Yet during his lifetime he owned more than 600 slaves and at the time of his death, more than 130 slaves were sold to pay off his debts.

An exhibit currently on display at the Missouri History Museum elaborates on this paradox.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:24 pm
Wed August 21, 2013

250th Anniversary Of St. Louis Inspires Museum Exhibit '250 in 250'

James Eads, self-taught engineer and constructor of the first bridge to span the Mississippi River. One of the 50 people in the 250 in 250 Exhibit.
(Courtesy Missouri History Museum Collections)

In recognition of the 250th anniversary of St. Louis, the Missouri History Museum is compiling an exhibit called "250 in 250," highlighting 50 people, 50 places, 50 images, 50 moments and 50 objects.

"I suppose the easiest thing for us to do would have been to do an exhibit on the city's founding," said Jody Sowell, director of exhibitions and research at the Missouri History Museum. "But we really wanted to come up with something that would cover that whole span of time, and really show the richness, diversity and complexity of that history."

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St. Louis on the Air
4:09 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Report: St. Louis Economy Improving But Challenges Persist

Multi-axis machined defense part made by Homeyer Precision Manufacturing
(Courtesy: Homeyer Precision Manufacturing)

The Workforce Solutions Group at St. Louis Community College released its fifth annual State of the St. Louis Workforce Report earlier this month. The report is a compilation of data from 1,200 employers and surveys of more than 180 students.

The Executive Summary states:

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St. Louis on the Air
4:41 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Returning From War: The Science Of War's Invisible Wounds

(via Flickr/KurtClark)

During World War II, it was called shell shock. During the Vietnam War it was called the Vietnam Syndrome. It wasn't until 1980 that psychologists had an official term for the condition: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

With the recognition of PTSD as a psychological condition, large-scale studies of the disorder began, said  Dr. Rumi Kato Price, professor of psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine.

"Now we have very well established evidence-based treatments for PTSD," said Price. "That took three decades (to develop)."

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St. Louis on the Air
4:37 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Returning From War: The Difficulties Of Re-Adjusting To Life In The United States

More than 60 Soldiers with the 204th Area Support Medical Company return from a nine-month deployment to Basrah, Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom on July 1, 2010 at the armory in Cottage Grove, Minn.
(via Flikr/ Sgt. Dajon Schafer, Minnesota National Guard Public Affairs)

For Captain Michelle Matthews, readjusting to home was more difficult than adjusting to war. A reservist with previous active duty experience, Matthews was deployed with the Missouri National Guard to Iraq in December of 2005.

"Life was a lot easier at war in some aspects," said Matthews. "I didn't have to cook, get gas, pay bills. But we were at war."

"We were mortared every day," she added. She described a joke about hearing mortars. If you could hear them, you were good. If you couldn't hear them, then you were in trouble.

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