Camille Phillips

News Producer and Weekend Newscaster

Camille Phillips began working for St. Louis Public Radio in July 2013 as the online producer for the talk shows. She grew up in southwest Missouri and has a Master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism, University of Missouri-Columbia.

Camille has also worked at public radio stations in Columbia, Mo. and Kansas City, Mo. As an intern for Harvest Public Media her work aired on KCUR, KBIA, NET Nebraska, Kansas Public Radio and Iowa Public Radio.

In her free time, Camille enjoys reading, dance, hiking and canoeing. She was drawn to journalism as a profession by a passion for hearing different perspectives and a desire to provide a platform for conversation.

Ways To Connect

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis area road crews are preparing for the first real snow storm of the year. The forecast is calling for four to eight inches to fall overnight, with another one to three inches expected on Monday.

According to Maggie Crane, spokeswoman for St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, the St. Louis Streets Department began treating roads with brine Saturday and they were putting down another layer Sunday. Crane said snow plow crews are working 12-hour shifts.

Monica Johnson (left) and Kimberly St. Clair lead a job training session for Ferguson 1000 Jobs on Saturday, February 14, 2015.
Camille Phillips | St.Louis Public Radio

One of the organizations formed to help Ferguson and the surrounding north St. Louis County region after the death of Michael Brown is gearing up for its first so-called “hiring event.”

Ferguson 1000 Jobs held a job training session Saturday at Ferguson Heights Church of Christ in preparation for the hiring event on February 28. During the training they discussed resume writing and practiced mock interviews.

St. Louis Metropolitan Police Chief Sam Dotson explains public safety protocol for the parade as Mardi Gras Foundation President Mack Bradley looks on.
Camille Phillips | St.Louis Public Radio

The historic Soulard neighborhood in south St. Louis is gearing up for its annual Mardi Gras parade this Saturday. Thousands of people are expected to line the streets for a view of the Valentine-themed floats.

According to Mardi Gras Foundation president Mack Bradley, Mardi Gras festivities add about $23 million to the regional economy.

The forecast calls for chilly temperatures this weekend, but Bradley said he’s not concerned about the cold keeping people away.

Joseph Davis, the newly selected superintendent of Ferguson-Florissant, gives students a round of applause, saying that they are the reason he's here.
Camille Phillips | St.Louis Public Radio

Updated at 8:00 p.m. to include details from Wednesday afternoon’s news conference.

Ferguson-Florissant school board president Rob Chabot officially introduced the district’s new superintendent Wednesday afternoon in front of a backdrop of Ferguson-Florissant students.

Joe McDonald (back left) came up with the idea for a fitness app that measures power use. He and his team are hammering out their presentation for the company tentatively called Watt Runner.
Camille Phillips | St.Louis Public Radio

Updated at 11:05 a.m. Monday February 9, 2015 to include competition results.  

On Friday, St. Louis held it's first bio-health Startup Weekend. For 54 hours, eight teams worked to build a health-related business from the ground up.

Cities around the country and the globe have held Startup Weekends. St. Louis had its first Startup Weekend in 2012.

Ferguson activist Ebony Williams (left) has been a regular at area protests calling for police reform. She says she wants to learn coding and other tech skills to bring them back to the community. Danie Banks (right) of Thoughtworks is her mentor for the
Camille Phillips | St.Louis Public Radio

For the next six weeks, 10 young people, many with ties to Ferguson demonstrations, will spend three days a week learning web coding, business technology and how to protect themselves from cyber-attacks.

Activist group Hands Up United organized the program through the help of Abby Bobé with the IT consulting firm ThoughtWorks. Other ThoughtWorks employees also are involved.

Bobé said the goal of the six-week workshop is to give more people of color in the St. Louis area an opportunity to learn about technology.

St. Louis Public Radio

The legality of granting subpoena power to a proposed civilian police review board has little bearing on St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay’s opposition to it. Slay said Friday that he would veto a civilian review board bill that includes subpoena power no matter what the city’s charter allows.

Slay is co-sponsor of a civilian oversight bill that does not include the power to subpoena witnesses and documents. Aldermen Antonio French proposed a second bill Thursday during a public safety committee meeting that would include subpoena power.

via Flickr/Michael R. Allen

Now that Lambert-St. Louis International Airport has finished its major physical improvements, it is working to position itself to best advantage in today’s aviation economy.

The airport released a five-year strategic plan Wednesday with broad goals to strengthen its finances and to better meet the needs of its passengers. The plan centers on utilizing every asset the airport has while recognizing its limitations.

Richard von Glahn explains the plan to canvass in House Speaker John Diehl's district as Judith Parker and Andrew Westbrook look on.
Camille Phillips | St.Louis Public Radio

Advocates continue to push for the expansion of Medicaid to include Missourians who fall in the so-called “coverage gap.”

Because Missouri has so far opted out of Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act, thousands of Missourians fall into a gap -- they make too much money to qualify for Medicaid, but not enough to qualify for federal aid on the healthcare exchange.

State legislators have made it clear that expansion is unlikely to happen this year either.

But Medicaid advocate Richard von Glahn remains optimistic.

At 107, Lucy Hamm is one of St. Louis's oldest residents. She lives in her own apartment at Tower Grove Manor retirement community.
Camille Phillips | St.Louis Public Radio

Lucy Hamm, one of St. Louis’ oldest residents, turned 107 Friday. She's just nine years younger than the oldest known person living in the world, Misao Okawa of Japan.

Hamm was born in Cairo, Ill., on Jan. 30, 1908.  She moved to St. Louis in her 20s and has lived in the Tower Grove Manor retirement community in south St. Louis for 14 years.

Pro-police rally organizer Trish Dennison holds the bullhorn for the pledge of allegiance on Saturday, January 24, 2015.
Camille Phillips | St.Louis Public Radio

Several dozen people showed their support for police Saturday afternoon in Clayton with a rally in front of St. Louis County Police headquarters. Many dressed in blue and white. Some carried signs that read “We support our LEOs” and “Police Lives Matter.” Others waved American flags.

At a table in front of the memorial for slain officers, Bill Peiper and Teresa Tate sold T-shirts with their 6-year-old son, Colton Tate. 

File photo

There’s a new effort underway to shut down the East St. Louis Election Board.

Illinois State Rep. Dwight Kay (R-Glen Carbon) is sponsoring a bill to close it. Kay’s district includes portions of Madison and St. Clair County, but not East St. Louis.

If the bill passes, the St. Clair County Clerk will take over responsibility for elections in East St. Louis.

Dancers perform at the Our Lady of Guadalupe celebration at Holy Trinity Parish on Sunday, Dec. 14, 2014.
Camille Phillips | St.Louis Public Radio

At Holy Trinity Catholic Parish in St. Ann, the feast day of Our Lady of Guadalupe is cause for major celebration. The north St. Louis County church honored the patron saint of Mexico last month with a special mass attended by more than 300 people, many of them Hispanic.

When the church bell struck noon, the parishioners processed around the church with an icon of the patron saint, singing songs in Spanish, led by a mariachi band. Inside the sanctuary, dancers in red moved to the beat of a drum, and the priest gave a blessing to the children.

Laurie Phillips, CEO of St. Patrick Center
courtesy St. Patrick Center

St. Patrick Center has a new leader at the helm. Laurie Phillips took over as CEO of the homeless services provider on Tuesday. She is the first woman in charge of the agency since Edith Cunnane founded the Catholic charity in 1983.

Nine members of the Congressional Black Caucus visited Wellspring United Methodist Church on Sunday. Seated left to right in the first row are: G.K. Butterfield, Andre Carson, Lacy Clay, Sheila Jackson Lee and Karen Bass.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

Wellspring United Methodist Church in Ferguson hosted nine members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) Sunday for a service commemorating Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

The chair of the CBC, G.K. Butterfield, told the congregation that all 46 members of the caucus are committed to comprehensive criminal justice reform.

“And so we have come to commemorate Dr. King. But we’ve also come to promise you, to promise Ferguson and promise America that the issue of criminal justice reform is the centerpiece of the CBC agenda in the 114th Congress,” Butterfield said.

Stan and Sandra Burton manned the National Society of Black Engineers booth at the Minority Scientist Showcase Saturday, January 17, 2015 at the St. Louis Science Center.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

  Visitors to the St. Louis Science Center will see more than the usual exhibits this weekend.

St. Louis area scientists have descended on the center for its annual Minority Scientist Showcase. Dozens of organizations are manning booths at the center through Monday so that kids can see science in action and meet people who make a career out of it.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay thanks HUD Deputy Director Nani Coloretti for the grant as 5th Ward Alderwoman Tammika Hubbard looks on.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 5:00 p.m. with further information about planning partners and neighborhood boundaries.

The neighborhood centered around an 1,800-unit assisted housing project just north of downtown St. Louis will be the focus of a $500,000 planning grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Friday.

About a hundred people gathered at the foot of Laclede statue Sunday, January 11, 2015 for a moment of silence during a vigil for the victims shot Wednesday during an attack at the Paris office of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Sunday at 7:51 p.m. with more detail from the attacks in France.

Despite the cold and rain, about a hundred people gathered in front of Laclede statue in downtown St. Louis Sunday to remember the victims of a suspected terrorist attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

Illinois Gov.-Elect Bruce Rauner shakes the hand of a diner at Red Apple Family Restaurant in Maryville, Ill. on January 10, 2015.
Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

With the countdown to inauguration day down to two, Illinois Governor-Elect Bruce Rauner stepped into Red Apple Family Restaurant in the Metro East Saturday with a Carhartt jacket on his back and a smile on his face.

The discerning eye could note a silver Illinois-shaped pin stuck to the lapel of the tan work coat.

The crowded red-roofed eatery in the village of Maryville was the Republican’s first stop Saturday—the second day of his pre-inauguration tour.

electric lines
Tom Taker via Flickr

St. Louisans wishing to comment on the possibility of an increase in their electric bill will have two chances to speak with the Missouri agency that regulates investor-owned utilities Monday.

The Missouri Public Service Commission is holding a public hearing at noon at the Holiday Inn on Watson Road near Kirkwood and another at 6 p.m. at St. Louis Community College-Florissant Valley.

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