Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Carolina Hidalgo

Photojournalist

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A jockey rides a horse back past the finish line after a race on opening day at Fairmount Park.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

There were 30 minutes until the first race of the day and the locker room at Fairmount Park Racetrack buzzed with activity. Jockeys flipped through race programs and flicked their whips through the air. Television sets perched on cluttered shelves flashed scenes of the track outside, where fans filled the stands for opening day of the Collinsville racetrack's 91st season.

As announcers counted down in anticipation, the jockeys helped each other tape up aching joints and teased each other playfully. Some said a quick prayer.

Re-enactors walk quietly through the woods at Busch Memorial Conservation Area in St. Charles County.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

As a production crew carried lights, cameras and generators into a thicket of pine trees at Busch Memorial Conservation Area on a recent morning, Jeremy Turner stood on the bed of his pickup and surveyed the small group of friends and acquaintances he'd recruited to join him on set.

Bishop Derrick Robinson and Rev. Rebecca Ragland place a candle on the spot where 15-year-old Jorevis Scruggs died after being shot by a police officer.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Clergy members, activists and community members gathered Thursday to mourn the death of 15-year-old Jorevis Scruggs, who was fatally shot by police earlier this week. Police say the teen was shot after he pointed a gun at an officer who gave chase as Scruggs jumped out of a suspected stolen car.

About three dozen people attended the vigil, placing teddy bears and “Black Lives Matters” signs in the residential alley where Scruggs died near St. Louis Avenue and Bacon Street. They lit candles, prayed and called for changes in community-police relations.

Co-anchors Karen Lomax and Amorion Bland discuss their delivery while recording an episode of Koch TV.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Fifth-grader Saniya Bryant sits at a desk at Koch Elementary, meticulously studying a set of questions. Behind her, a lime green cloth hangs from the ceiling. Across from her, a fourth-grader swivels a video camera in her direction.

“Quiet on set.”

Grace Kenyon walks her dogs, Lhenny and Brown, near the Ashley Street Power House, a city landmark that developers have said could become a team store in the proposed stadium plan.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

As debate continues over the proposed riverfront football stadium, those who live and work within the planned footprint have obvious reasons to pay attention.

A few of the area’s historic buildings, including the Ashley Street Power House, are set to be spared. But others face uncertain fates if the new stadium actually becomes a reality.

Are these buildings worth saving? As expected, opinions differ.

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