David Baugher | St. Louis Public Radio

David Baugher

David Baugher

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: For most people, turning 30 isn’t a cause for festivities.

But for the Arch Angels, hitting $30 million in investment seems as good a reason for a party as any.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: It may not be quite the fast food-fuelled all-nighter of most youthful memories, but cram sessions aren’t just for university kids anymore.

“It might be relevant for college students who do it more often,” said Travis Sheridan, assistant vice president for innovation and entrepreneurship at the St. Louis County Economic Council, “but I think a lot of us could use a good cram session from time to time.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Two competing visions of sustainability will be on display early next week in a program designed to let the general public explore the future of food production.

“Sustainability in terms of our food means different things to different people and there are different perspectives on what it means to grow food sustainably,” said Rose Jansen, director of Earth science programs and speakers for science at the Academy of Science-St. Louis, a local nonprofit.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: If we are a culture that often equates dirt with worthlessness, Howard G. Buffett would like to change that.

“Soil may not be sexy, and that’s probably part of the problem,” he told an audience of a few dozen on the Monsanto campus Tuesday afternoon. “But it is what sustains our productivity and we can’t change that.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: A mobile coupon service for smartphones, a boring bit company and a digital marketing tool for restaurants are among 20 winners of the second annual Arch Grants competition.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Jenny Dibble is hoping women will go WEST.

“We have the traditional entrepreneur but also female leaders within organizations,” said the 29-year-old Webster Groves resident. “We serve to help push women beyond the owner/operator role into the CEO role, get them out of the day-to-day and into the growth stage of their business.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When his slide clicker malfunctioned up on stage, Brian Kohlberg kept his cool. Afterward, he was philosophical.

“It was just one of those things I can’t control so I had to keep moving on and show the resilience of our company,” chuckled Kohlberg, founder of Manufacturers' Inventory, an online marketplace for industrial and electrical components. “We’re going to hit some bumps in the road….we’ll still make it through.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Framed in front of the handsome brick incubator facility at 315 Lemay Ferry Road, Beth Noonan expresses the hopes of a lot of folks in county economic development.

“We believe that our incubators will be a place where people connect and things happen, a place where entrepreneurs can share ideas and solve problems together,” Noonan told several dozen gathered in the chilly shade of a white tent. “We look forward to working together to drive the success of our client companies and of the region.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: A shipping container may not seem the ideal place for a fine dining establishment, but Phil Valko knows that sometimes it’s good to think outside the box.

Even if that box happens to be a repurposed cargo storage unit housing a restaurant on a vacant lot.

“Their idea is so insane, it just might work,” Washington University’s director of sustainability told a chuckling standing-room-only audience in the dimly lit basement of Bridge, a fashionable Locust Avenue wine bar.

Gil Bickel
Provided by Mr. Bickel

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: This fall, the nation will mark five years since the onset of the biggest global economic collapse in more than a generation.

The unhappy milestone of those turbulent autumn weeks, which ushered in a stormy era of bank bailouts and credit crises before giving way to a frigid drizzle of financial uncertainty, will be celebrated by few.

Yet locally the picture for startups seeking capital has brightened in ways that couldn’t have been foreseen in the days when the troubles of AIG and Lehman Brothers dominated the headlines.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The renewable energy community has long been in something of a quandary. Everyone wants more solar and wind power, but the dilemma is obvious.

What do you do when the wind doesn’t blow or the sun fails to shine?

It was a question which Willett Kempton wanted to answer.  How dependable are these sources, known in the industry as “variable generation,” in dealing with a working power grid?

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The renewable energy community has long been in something of a quandary. Everyone wants more solar and wind power, but the dilemma is obvious.

What do you do when the wind doesn’t blow or the sun fails to shine?

It was a question which Willett Kempton wanted to answer.  How dependable are these sources, known in the industry as “variable generation,” in dealing with a working power grid?

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When it comes to faculty researchers bringing technology from the workbench to the market, Kevin Whittington says it’s all about making a difference, not about making a buck.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: It’s a chilly Wednesday afternoon, but Angie Meara is coming away with a fine haul. Grasping a bag with fresh bacon, pasta, eggs and turnip greens, she’s feeling good about what’s for dinner. There’s even a package of sunflower shoots.

“These are so yummy,” said the 42-year-old Skinker-DeBaliviere resident. “They are like candy for my kids.”

Adult Ozark hellbenders can reach up to two feet in length, making them one of the largest salamanders in the world.
Ray Meibaum | Saint Louis Zoo

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Flat-headed, wriggly, covered in slime and looking like a cross between a lizard, a fish and an eel, the hellbender probably won’t win a contest for Missouri’s cutest critter. Its very name is likely a speculation by early settlers on the creature’s place of origin.

“Some people say they look like they are bent on returning to where they belong because they are so ugly,” said Jeff Briggler, a herpetologist from the Missouri Department of Conservation.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 31, 2012 - When a reporter tells Michael Howard that he wants to write an article that clears away the politics of the stem cell debate and just talks about the science, the UMSL assistant teaching professor of biology is quick with a response.

"Good luck with that," he said, a good-natured tone in his voice.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 26, 2012 - Jacqueline Grennan Wexler, a noted educator and former president of Webster University who transferred control of the institution away from the Catholic Church, died in her sleep on Jan. 19, 2012, in Orlando, Fla. She was 85.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 15, 2012 - Robert Hedges has been involved in businesses from the ground up before. He just needs to run across someone with the right idea.

Fortunately, he knows where he might look.

"It's a chance to possibly get in on something from the beginning and in more general terms get back into the energy and mindset of startups and see what's going on in St. Louis," said the 46-year-old electrical engineer.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 8, 2012 - There is an old saying about the best-laid plans, but Jennifer Howland will gladly tell you that no blueprint is one-size-fits-all.

"What we envision is not a plan where everything would be the same no matter which community you are in," she said. "It's more about giving local communities options that they can select from and take steps based on their own sets of priorities to achieve a more sustainable future for their citizens."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Dec. 6, 2011 - To paraphrase the old saying, if it looks like a stuffed elephant and it feels like a stuffed elephant, then clearly it's a ... plastic bottle.

Well, not exactly.

Jessica Kester is holding a small stuffed elephant made of chipped plastic, melted and recycled into fleece.

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