David Baugher | St. Louis Public Radio

David Baugher

David Baugher

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Dec. 6, 2011 - To paraphrase the old saying, if it looks like a stuffed elephant and it feels like a stuffed elephant, then clearly it's a ... plastic bottle.

Well, not exactly.

Jessica Kester is holding a small stuffed elephant made of chipped plastic, melted and recycled into fleece.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Dec. 5, 2012 - When 110-year-old Missouri native Frank Buckles, the last surviving American veteran of the First World War, died this year in West Virginia, it marked the passing not just of a man but of a generation.

Bryan McGraw, director of the National Archives at St. Louis, worries that a similar fate is now sweeping those of the Greatest Generation as we approach the 70th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Jenny Murphy founder of Perennial
David Baugher | St. Louis Beacon

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 25, 2011 - On Sunday nights or predawn Monday mornings you can sometimes find Jenny Murphy on an unusual quest in the streets and alleys of St. Louis. She doesn't look at garbage the same way you do.

And she doesn't want you to either.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 22, 2011 - Many St. Louisans will be looking to do some serious bargain hunting over the next month. What kind of unique item can you get for the man or woman on your gift list who has everything?

If the answer is organic lollipops or a composting toilet, then Terry Winkelman and Phil Judd have exactly what you are looking for.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 28, 2011 - A catchy phrase or destiny: 11 in 11.

Destiny. After David Freese belted a homer in the bottom of the 11th inning (there's that number again) to send the World Series to a Game 7, the joy of Cardinal Nation seemed ordained.

Even before the Cardinals magical run, 11 was coming up big.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 25, 2011 - Two dozen feet below the joggers, dog walkers and artists painting picturesque still lifes on a clear, cool fall morning in Forest Park, Lance LeComb stands at the mouth of a darkened reinforced concrete tunnel backed by an opaque, mildly odiferous grayish-green stream flowing from toilets, showers and drains in thousands of St. Louis-area homes and businesses.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 25, 2011 - If you wonder why a Shakespeare expert might speak at a conference on cities on the same bill with sociologists, historians and philosophers, you wouldn't be alone.

That's just what the Shakespeare expert wanted to know.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 18, 2011 -  Richard Muller says the global warming debate in the media seems to break down into two clear sides.

And Muller doesn't want to be on either of them.

"So much of what is reported in the newspapers is the debate between the deniers and the alarmists," he said. "The truth is in between."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 17, 2011 - One might assume that anybody having the official title of "wonder instigator and relevance czar" would expect a few quizzical looks. When Clayton P. Moore wrote his unusual workplace designation he was hoping it would prompt more answers than questions.

"I wanted a title that explained not only what I do but how I do it," said Moore of Science Museum Oklahoma.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 14, 2011 - If there were any doubt that the e-book revolution had arrived, it was erased for the St. Louis County Library after the most recent holiday season when the system's website crashed due to a sudden rush of downloads.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 12, 2011 - This month, when Estela Neel breaks in the new books for her learning skills class, she'll also be breaking new ground.

"It's just so convenient," she said of the 25 new Nook e-readers she will use to educate students at Hazelwood Northwest Middle School on Shackelford Road. "It's so fantastic to have this tiny thing in your possession where you can take notes and the kids can look up words they don't know and highlight things."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 28, 2011 - The year 1986 was a good one for Dr. Camillo Ricordi. For one thing, he got married. For another, he invented an effective treatment for the most severe cases of diabetes.

"It was my reward," he jokes of the wedding to then-St. Louisan Valerie Grace Ricordi.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 28, 2011 - Donn Rubin will tell you it's not very flashy.

"We're not trying to build an empire here," he laughs.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 20, 2011 - When Dr. David Curiel talks about his last institution, the University of Alabama at Birmingham, he marvels at the success of the four decade-old school.

"In 25 years (funding) went from nonexistent to [being in the] top 20 in federal funding," he said. "It's just uncanny."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 29, 2011 - "A Tribute to the Troops" will be the theme of an upcoming festival to honor the nation's military.

Set for Labor Day weekend in Forest Park, the three-day event, held under the auspices of the Missouri Veterans Foundation, will recognize the armed services with a variety of happenings from Sept. 3-5 including an arts and crafts show, a 1K and 5K walk and softball, tennis and golf tournaments.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 22, 2011 - The cases were initially baffling. Children were turning up with too much insulin in their blood as well as an excess of ammonia, sometimes building to toxic levels. Merely consuming too much protein could induce hypoglycemic coma or even death.

"This was a very unique set of symptoms," said Thomas Smith of the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center. "You might have a tumor in your pancreas and you secrete too much insulin. That's hyper insulinism. But you never get this ammonia link."

Love and the city

Aug 12, 2011

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 12, 2011 - With all the pens, sharpies, post-its and large sheets of paper scattered across a dozen tables where small groups busily work creating, one might think Peter Kageyama is running an art seminar as he paces the front of the room.

Of course, in a very real sense that's what he's doing. But Kageyama's canvas is a more abstract landscape than most -- a very urban and very personal one that rests somewhere at the nexus of marketing, art, civics and ... well ... love.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 5, 2011 - Holding forth to a rapt audience at the St. Louis Science Center last night, Dr. Mark Frisse is giving a most unusual presentation.

For one thing, he's halfway into a lecture, "Battling the Odds: Medical Care During the American Civil War," when he pauses the energetic, rapid-fire talk that mentions James B. Eads, the importance of rivers as transportation conduits, St. Louis' civic future and the need for civility in political discourse in order to briefly note the one topic that has only marginally entered the conversation.

Namely, medical care during the American Civil War.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, July 29, 2011 - Dr. Ghazala Hayat recalls well the climate after the terrorist attacks nearly a decade ago.

"I would say for sure, all over the country since 9/11, it's gotten worse," said Hayat, who chairs the public relations committee of the Islamic Foundation of St. Louis. "There's no question."

Bedbug
Wikipedia

This summer, when Linda Morgan began waking up with strange bug bites on her arm, she didn’t know quite what to make of them.

“I still have the scars,” said the 51-year-old Granite City resident. “They were incredibly itchy, 10 times worse than mosquito bites.”

Pages