Don Marsh

Host

Don Marsh has extensive and broad media experience, with a career beginning in 1959. Starting as a managing editor for a small magazine in New Jersey, he went on to become a radio news writer in Germany; an Eastern European correspondent and bureau chief for the American Forces Network; news director at WJZ-TV in Baltimore; anchorman/political specialist reporter/producer at KTVI-TV in St. Louis; a talk show host for KMOX radio; an anchorman for KDNL-TV; and a producer of training videos for law enforcement. He began as host of St. Louis Public Radio’s St. Louis on the Air in September 2005. His many professional awards include 12 Regional Emmy Awards, and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Don was inducted into the STL Hall of Fame in 2014. In 2015, he was named STL Media Person of the Year and also received an honorary doctorate from the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

file photo

Bob Cox, a former senior vice president of St. Louis-based technology company Emerson, was hired last week to be the temporary leader of the Missouri History Museum.

The tax payer funded institution has been mired in controversy since the Museum overpaid for land, a sale which involved ex-Mayor Freeman Bosley Jr.  Bosley had recently stepped down from the Museum’s board of trustees.

Longtime Missouri History Museum President Bob Archibald resigned in December 2012.

When one mentions the name Marsha Mason, what comes to most people’s mind is the award winning actress who starred in the films Cinderella Liberty, Only When I Laugh, Chapter Two and The Goodbye Girl. But Insight Theatre Company Artistic Director Maggie Ryan remembers Mason as a fellow theater major at Webster College and as being an alum of Nerinx Hall High School where Ryan is now the Fine Arts Chair.

(via Flickr/KurtClark)

About 5,100 civilian workers at Scott Air Force Base in Illinois are being forced to take-off 11 unpaid days, as are civilian employees at military installations throughout the Department of Defense.  The furloughs begin July 8 and are a result of the automatic federal spending cuts known as sequestration.

Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis

A year ago, James Buford announced that he intended to retire after almost three decades as President and CEO of the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis.  He just celebrated his 69th birthday and May 31 was to have been his last day. But instead, he was asked to stay on another month while the agency completes the process of hiring his successor. He will then serve in a consulting capacity to help the new CEO get acclimated to the position.

(Courtesy: Aisha Sultan)

Regular readers of the St. Louis Post Dispatch are familiar with the byline of Aisha Sultan.  She began writing a regular column in 2008 on parenting and family life called Dirty Laundry.

Missouri Solar Energy Industry Association

The use of alternative energies such as solar and wind is not new though advancements in technology and conversations about the effects of climate change are ongoing.

Many communities, including some in the St. Louis area, are making a big commitment to going green and utilizing solar energy with the encouragement of the Environmental Protection Agency.  The Green Power Community Challenge includes Clayton and Creve Coeur.

Host Don Marsh led a discussion about the commercial and residential use of solar energy.

(via Flickr/KurtClark)

Memorial Day is one of just a couple days a year in which attention is brought specifically to veterans.

While the remembrance earlier this week is a reminder of veterans’ service to the country, the issues and needs associated with returning veterans is an ongoing issue.  Many veterans struggle with health and emotional issues such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), have difficulty finding jobs and trouble finding a new normalcy in civilian life.

James Cridland via Flickr

Legal issues are never far from the headlines and in many cases, they are the headlines.

The Missouri Legislature recently ended its session and passed some bills worth considering from a legal perspective.  One bill bars the implementation of Agenda 21, a non-binding United Nations plan which promotes sustainable development.  Another would bar Sharia law in Missouri.

Host Don Marsh talked with a panel of legal experts to explain those issues and more. 

The panelists included:

(Flickr Creative Commons User Daniel Leininger)

The City of St. Louis and local organizations and businesses are teaming up to try to alleviate the problems of poverty and crime in the community.

The new initiative is called STL Youth Jobs, a summer pilot program aimed at high risk youth between the ages of 16 and 23.

St. Louis Public Radio reported on the initiative when it was first announced.

Courtesy: Panera Bread Co.

It’s not uncommon for companies to have a policy concerning corporate social responsibility.  But, do companies have an obligation to help communities?  If so, is it just certain types of businesses?  Plus, how do you factor in a company’s desire to help and, at the same time, benefit the bottom line?

(via Flickr / Brian Hillegas)

Engaging in sports can be beneficial to young athletes.  They provide the opportunity to be physically fit, learn discipline and build character in a fun environment.

The fun stops, however, when a sudden and unexpected injury or surprise medical condition intervenes.  This potential is worrisome to parents and coaches as talk and awareness of concussions seem to be at an all-time high.

Host Don Marsh talked with Tony Breitbach, Director of the Athletic Training Education Program at Saint Louis University, about what can be done to protect young athletes’ health.

National Human Genome Research Institute

Cancer is cruel and it impacts the lives of far too many people and their families.  According to the World Health Organization, breast cancer kills 458,000 people each year.

Recently, actress and director Angelina Jolie, in a New York Times op-ed entitled My Medical Choice, announced she received a double mastectomy in order to minimize her risk of getting breast cancer.

Jolie has a genetic predisposition to breast cancer.  Her mom died from the disease at the age of 56.

Missouri Capitol building
Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

The 2013 Missouri legislative session is now in the books.

While legislators are no longer assembled in Jefferson City, the impacts of what did and did not get done will continue into the coming months.

The Republican controlled House and Senate put gun rights and taxes high on their agenda and perennial issues such as abortion and voter photo IDs came up.

Democratic Governor Jay Nixon has already vetoed some legislation and more vetoes are possible.

via Wikimedia Commons / Missouri Historical Society

The legacy of African Americans who have made contributions in Missouri is highlighted in a new book written by retired local educators John and Sylvia Wright.

The name of the book is Extraordinary Black Missourians: Pioneers, Leaders, Performers, Athletes, & Other Notables Who’ve Made History.

Many of the people highlighted in the book such as Dred Scott, Langston Hughes and Scott Joplin are well-known.  Others such as concert pianist Blind Boone and teacher and entomologist Charles Henry Turner are not as well known.

(via Flickr / David Lytle)

More than a million students nationwide are homeless.

Children who lack a permanent or stable household is an important yet, perhaps, overlooked issue and that’s true in the St. Louis area where several thousand students do not have a permanent home.

c_ambler | Flickr

Hundreds of thousands of American workers are paid the minimum wage.  It’s $7.25 nationally and $7.35 in St. Louis.  While the perception may be that minimum and low wage jobs are mostly held by teens, the vast majority, 75 percent, are adults over the age of 20.

Recent local news reports have highlighted protests by minimum wage earners.  They are demanding that their pay be nearly doubled.  The campaign is called “St. Louis Can’t Survive on $7.35.”

Fran Collin

UC Berkeley Journalism Professor Michael Pollan has devoted a good deal of his career to examining the food we eat in today’s society and the hazards of much of it.  Four of his books are New York Times Bestsellers and have received many other accolades: Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual, In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals and The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World.

(via Flickr / Daniel P Davis)

Magdalene is a residential program which provides services to women who are involved in prostitution, trafficking and addiction.

The program was founded in 1997 by Becca Stevens, an Episcopal priest at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.

Christopher Buchanan / Insignia Films

When Twin Cities Public Television, tpt National Productions and Insignia Films wanted to produce a documentary series for PBS examining what the Constitution means in the 21st Century, they didn’t take the conventional route.  Instead of rounding up a number of experts who would talk on a studio set in front of book cases, they asked the host of NPR’s Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me to get on a red, white and blue Harley Davidson and travel across the country.

When anonymity is one of the major tenets of the best known addiction recovery organization, it seems incongruous that Greg Williams, a person in long-term recovery from drug abuse, is urging others like him to publicly disclose their status.  He believes that is the answer to counter the stigma that is still prevalent toward addiction and treatment for it.  He is so certain that he is right that he has devoted months of his life to “The Anonymous People,” a film documenting the many “game changers” as he calls them, people who are willing to be open about their success with recovery.

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