Don Marsh


Don Marsh has extensive and broad media experience, with a career beginning in 1959. Starting as a managing editor for a small magazine in New Jersey, he went on to become a radio news writer in Germany; an Eastern European correspondent and bureau chief for the American Forces Network; news director at WJZ-TV in Baltimore; anchorman/political specialist reporter/producer at KTVI-TV in St. Louis; a talk show host for KMOX radio; an anchorman for KDNL-TV; and a producer of training videos for law enforcement. He began as host of St. Louis Public Radio’s St. Louis on the Air in September 2005. His many professional awards include 12 Regional Emmy Awards, and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Don was inducted into the STL Hall of Fame in 2014. In 2015, he was named STL Media Person of the Year and also received an honorary doctorate from the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

(via Flickr/

Medication is often a routine treatment for children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

A recently released report by the Centers for Disease Control shows nearly 9 percent of Missouri’s children are diagnosed with ADHD and that about 80 percent of them receive prescription medication for the behavioral disorder, a rate second only to Mississippi.

(Courtesy: Tim Collins)

Talking about sex is often a difficult conversation for parents to have with their children.

A new one-man play, entitled The Big Talks, performed by solo theater performer Tim Collins seeks to demonstrate effective ways in which parents can communicate with their children about sexual health and teen pregnancy.

Sarah Fishbein

At one time or other, almost every young person has had a desire to run off and join the circus.  But in Clayton native Duncan Wall’s case, it wasn’t until he was a junior in college and was “blown away” by the contemporary circus he attended in Paris, that he got the circus bug. 

Wall's background included sports and theater and he was attracted by the combination of the two.

(Missouri History Museum)

St. Louis has a long had a special relationship with the trolley.  It’s a relationship immortalized by actor and singer Judy Garland in the film Meet Me In St. Louis

Currently, there are independent efforts in St. Louis to revive the presence of a trolley, or as some proponents say, streetcar. 

(via NPR)

NPR's senior social media strategist Andy Carvin was our sole guest today on "St. Louis on the Air." 

Carvin touched on his beginnings, his role as a "information DJ" and how he pieces together truth in real time.

How does he describe his job?

Carvin said one of the best ways he can think of to describe what he does is a "journalistic test pilot."

"I use the word storytelling because...not everything I do could be considered journalism."

"Someone once referred to what I do as 'information DJ-ing.'"

Last summer’s drought in the United States, and particularly here in the Midwest, would lead one to ask if there is enough water to meet the world’s needs.  According to Dr. Roberto Lenton, Professor of Biological Systems Engineering and Executive Director of the Robert B. Daugherty Water for Food Institute at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln, the answer is “yes.”

Lance Tilford Photography

Life coach Jill Farmer quit her career as a television consumer reporter and discovered that although she no longer had a fulltime job, she was still busy with little productivity to show for it.  She found herself swinging from the “hamster wheel” mode of moving for the sake of moving but not seeming to get anything done, to the overwhelming state of paralysis where she wasn’t sure where to start.

Evan C. Parker / Via Flickr

The St. Louis Beacon’s Washington Correspondent Rob Koenig was Don Marsh’s guest on “St.

Anna Saphphire via Flickr

The Violence Against Women Act was originally passed by Congress in 1994, spearheaded by then Senator Joe Biden.  But when the act expired in 2011, it took more than a year of wrangling before Congress could come to terms on its reauthorization.  When President Obama signed the reauthorization of the act on March 7, several additional groups of women were covered.  Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered persons, Native American women on tribal land and immigrants are now protected.


Making the transition from the military to civilian life can be difficult. 

Many veterans come out of the military with combat trauma, a condition which must be dealt with before they can move on.  And many don’t admit their condition for fear their discharge will be delayed or they won’t be able to get jobs needing a security clearance or jobs in law enforcement. 

Only a fraction of those with combat trauma register with a VA hospital.

(Courtesy: Saint Louis Urban Debate League)

Debate is an activity in which thousands of high school and college students participate throughout the country.

The academic activity takes many forms and styles though ‘policy debate’ is one of the most common.


When Mary Beth Tinker was a middle school student in Iowa, she never dreamed that she would one day see her name attached to a Supreme Court decision in her college text book.  But that’s exactly what happened.

Ari Shapiro at microphone
Stephen Voss for NPR

Ari Shapiro is a White House correspondent for NPR.

His stories about ongoing political negotiations in Washington, D.C. are familiar to public radio listeners as is his recent guest hosting of Talk of the Nation.

Shapiro, a graduate of Yale University, began his journalism career in 2001 in the office of NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg.  He would go on to cover the Justice Department and serve reporting stints in Atlanta, Miami and Boston.  The award-winning journalist was the first NPR reporter to be promoted to correspondent before age thirty.

(via Flickr/marcn)

Earlier this year, the 113th Congress was sworn in and as part of that, there are now a record-breaking 20 female senators.

U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer of California told ABC “World News” anchor Diane Sawyer, "I think that until we get to 50, we still have to fight because it's still a problem.”

(Courtesey: Kevin Killeen)

Since 1995, Kevin Killeen has worked as a reporter for KMOX.  He began his career with St. Louis Public Radio | 90.7 KWMU. 

In his current role, he produces the station’s morning feature “A Whole ‘nother Story” and has written KMOX’s original holiday show for about the last 15 years.  Now, he’s written a book, “Never Hug A Nun,” a semi-autobiographical novel about his experiences growing up and going to a Catholic school in Webster Groves during the 1960s.

More than 3,000 St. Louis area artists filled out a survey called Artists Count, which helped inform the Regional Arts Commission’s (RAC) strategic plan.

The RAC has not previously funded individual artists, rather opting to fund nonprofit organizations and consortiums since 1985, when the organization was created.

Jill McGuire, Executive Director of the Regional Arts Commission, said “After reading this survey we made a commitment that the results of the study will affect our policies.”

Flickr | USACEpublicaffairs | file photo

The number of people who do not have enough food in the United States is a serious problem.

Information from the United States Department of Agriculture in 2011 shows:

  • 50.1 million people in the United States live in food insecure households
  • 33.5 million are adults
  • 16.7 million are children
  • 14.9% of all U.S. households are food insecure

Host Don Marsh talked with guests about the food crisis nationally as well as locally.

His guests were:

Evan C. Parker / Via Flickr

Don Marsh called upon the St.

By Beverly Pack / Via Flickr

Autism is becoming increasingly prevalent.  1 in 88 children is diagnosed with the condition and because it is more prevalent among boys, 1 in 54 boys receive the diagnosis.

The good news is that research is increasing and there are many more treatments from which to choose.

When Bruce Feiler set out to create a guide for happy families, he found that there is little research into what makes a family happy. 

What he found most useful didn’t come from the world of family studies.  Instead, he sought out those who know how to make groups and teams work more effectively and learned what they were doing with their families.  Then he took those things for a "test drive" with his own wife and twin girls, and articulated some things that work.

(via Flickr/mike matney)

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a legal battle between St. Louis-based Monsanto and a 75-year-old farmer from Indiana named Vernon Hugh Bowman.

While some Supreme Court justices have already tipped their hat signifying Monsanto will likely win the case, the issue revolves around whether Bowman violated Monsanto’s patent rights when he planted soybean seeds from a grain elevator.

(via Flickr/Tax Credits)

Last year, Congressional negotiations over the so-called fiscal cliff put year-end tax considerations in flux.

A deal was reached, and though the filing acceptance date was delayed a couple of weeks, the Internal Revenue Service is now accepting most 2012 tax returns.

The IRS did not, however, change the tax due date of April 15, 2013.

Host Don Marsh talked with St. Louis-based tax expert Lance Weiss, CPA, of SFW Partners, LLC.

Courtesy: St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Military men and women who serve overseas encounter dangerous situations and often struggle with separation from family and friends.

The same is true of journalists who embed themselves with soldiers.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch chief photographer J.B. Forbes, who has worked at the newspaper since 1975, and reporter Jesse Bogan recently returned from Afghanistan.  They were embedded with about 100 members of the Missouri National Guard’s 1138th Engineer Company, covering and sharing the stories of soldiers who have temporarily left their civilian jobs.  

Julie Stapen

In 2009, Susannah Cahalan, a graduate of Washington University in St. Louis, was a healthy 24-year old journalist at the New York Post.

One day that year, she found herself alone in a hospital room, strapped to her bed and unable to speak.

Cahalan had no memory, at the time, of her month long hospital stay, hallucinations and violent actions.

“(The doctors) became convinced I had bi-polar disorder,” she told host Don Marsh.

Eric Woolsey

As a world-renowned jazz trumpeter, composer and band leader, Terence Blanchard has received five Grammy Awards and has written jazz pieces for small ensembles, symphonic settings, film and stage. But when he was contacted by Opera Theatre of Saint Louis Artistic Director James Robinson about writing an opera, his first question was “are you sure you have the right guy?”  Robinson knew exactly what he was doing.

Wikimedia Commons / Library of Congress

Presidents’ Day honors the men who have lead the United States, though it’s clear not as much is known about the women who served with them.

The first of a thirty-five part, two-season C-SPAN series, “First Ladies: Influence and Image,” premieres tonight.  The goal, according to Executive Producer Mark Farkas, is to “reveal their personal challenges, accomplishments, and failures…and to provide a window into our nation’s history and the trajectory of women in our society.”

Dave Moore

Former Vice-President Al Gore appeared at the St. Louis County Library on Saturday, February 9 to open the Buzz Westfall Great Authors Series.  He spoke to a sell-out crowd of 800 about his new book, "The Future: Six Drivers of Global Change." Host Don Marsh introduced Gore and engaged in a discussion with him following the talk.

Kelsey Proud / St. Louis Public Radio

Is it Missour-ee or Missour-uh?

Those two pronunciations of the state, according to linguist John Baugh of Washington University in St. Louis, peacefully co-exist and are “indicative of all of the linguistic collisions from the rest of the country that happen in our wonderful city.”

Baugh and linguist Cindy Brantmeier of Washington University joined host Don Marsh to talk about how language forms, evolves, and is spoken differently throughout the United States.

Brittany Packnett is an alumna of Teach for America and, four months ago, started a new job as executive director of Teach For America – St. Louis.

Packnett was born and raised in St. Louis and returned to the city after spending five years in Washington D.C.  Beginning in 2007, her commitment to Teach for America brought her to Martin Luther King Elementary in Southeast D.C.  She later went to work for Congressman Lacy Clay and as director for TFA’s Government Affairs team.

"The reason why I came home is because this is my city - it's deeply personal," Packnett said.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Sandra Fluke is an attorney and women’s rights activist.

One year ago this month, Fluke was a law school student at Georgetown University and found herself immersed in a contentious national debate over the role of contraceptive coverage and whether coverage should be mandatory.  Opponents of mandatory coverage cited religious objections.

Sandra Fluke testified about the issue before Democrats in Congress.  After that, conservative radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh called her a “slut” and made other derogatory comments.