Durrie Bouscaren

Health and Science Reporter

Durrie Bouscaren covers healthcare and medical research throughout the St. Louis metro area. She comes most recently from Iowa Public Radio’s newsroom in Des Moines, where she reported on floods, a propane shortage, and small-town defense contractors. Since catching the radio bug in college, Bouscaren has freelanced and interned at NPR member stations WRVO, WAER and KQED. Her work has aired on All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Harvest Public Media, a regional reporting collaborative. 

A U.S. military helicopter in Afghanistan arrives to assist a medical evacuation.
Octavian Adam | U.S. Navy

In October 2011, large transport planes flew three mobile MRI machines into two U.S. military bases in southern Afghanistan with a mission: find the source of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by studying the brains of soldiers in combat.

The machines were installed in military trailers, fortified from the dust and steep temperature swings of the desert outside. The delicate imaging equipment was insulated from outdoor vibrations, sound and electromagnetic rays.

Kathy Smith, Miriam Steinberg, and Max Rosen are 4th year students at Washington University's School of Medicine.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Like many states, Missouri is facing a doctor shortage.

The supply of doctors isn't keeping up, even as the population ages and more people have health insurance to pay for medical care. The American Association of Medical Colleges estimates that the country will have a void of about 90,000 physicians by 2020—half of them in primary care.

When Missouri regulators approved his proposal Monday, St. Louis developer Paul McKee got one step closer to realizing his $6.8-million dollar project to build an urgent care center in north St. Louis. It's a start but won't fully address the area's needs, health experts say.

A participant listens to the discussion during a focus group following the Ferguson Commission meeting.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Using a PowerPoint voting system, more than half the people attending the Ferguson Commission’s seventh meeting on Monday night said that no, they don’t think racial tensions in the St. Louis area will ever be fully eliminated.

A view of St. Louis University Hospital, taken 02/23/15.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Citing the projected demand for primary care physicians in underserved areas, a California-based foundation is donating $6.6 million to Saint Louis University’s School of Medicine.

Adrian Clark | Flickr / Flickr

The numbers are in: 253,969 people in Missouri signed up for health insurance on Healthcare.gov this year, or were automatically re-enrolled in their plan. That’s about 100,000 more than last year’s open enrollment period.

Adrian Clark | Flickr / Flickr

Administrators for Missouri’s Medicaid program told members of their oversight committee that they are getting closer to fixing their processing delays for new applicants. But the wait can still take months.  

“We are now under 13,000 pending applications. I think we will get into that normal, historical range within the next week,” said Family Support Division Director Alyson Campbell at an oversight committee meeting of MO HealthNet, the social services division that administers Medicaid in Missouri.   

File photo of Mercy Hospital in St. Louis.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Measles have not yet reached the St. Louis area but, in an effort to thwart an outbreak, area clinics are reaching out to a group of parents whose children aren’t fully vaccinated. These children missed their vaccinations not for medical or religious reasons but because, quite simply, they may have forgotten.   

That’s now a relatively easy problem to address because of the widespread use of Electronic Health Records, or EHR’s.

Measles has not reached the St. Louis area this year, but that hasn’t kept it from stoking fears.  

Local public health officials are encouraging parents to make sure their children’s vaccinations are up-to-date by checking with their individual health providers. With worries that last month’s outbreak in Disneyland could continue to spread, officials in Illinois are investigating the source of five infants diagnosed with measles at a day care center outside Chicago.

Aids.gov

At least 5,638 people in the St. Louis region are living with HIV, according to 2013 numbers from the Missouri Department of Health. About 250 people were newly infected.  

Two out of three of those new cases affected African Americans.  

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