Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Durrie Bouscaren

Health and Science Reporter

Durrie Bouscaren covers healthcare and medical research throughout the St. Louis metro area. She comes most recently from Iowa Public Radio’s newsroom in Des Moines, where she reported on floods, a propane shortage, and small-town defense contractors. Since catching the radio bug in college, Bouscaren has freelanced and interned at NPR member stations WRVO, WAER and KQED. Her work has aired on All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Harvest Public Media, a regional reporting collaborative. 

Ways to Connect

St. Louis Ovarian Cancer Awareness president Lisa Sienkiewicz stands next to the Kiener Fountain in downtown St. Louis, which has been dyed teal in honor of National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month.
Durrie Bouscaren / St. Louis Public Radio

To kick off National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, local organizers dyed the water in the Kiener Plaza Fountain in downtown St. Louis teal -- the trademark color of the awareness campaign.

Sometimes called the ‘silent killer,’ ovarian cancer can be difficult to recognize before it’s in an advanced stage.

The rate of survival is low: 20,593 American women were diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2011. 14,346 women died, according to the Center for Disease Control. But treatments are most effective when the cancer is diagnosed in its earliest stages.

Attorney General Eric Holder visited Ferguson Aug. 20.
Office of U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay

Attorney General Eric Holder said Thursday that his conversations with residents of Ferguson during his visit two weeks ago influenced his decision to investigate the city’s police department.

Holder says he heard directly from residents and listening sessions “about the deep mistrust that has taken hold between law enforcement officials and members of the community. ... People consistently expressed concerns stemming from specific alleged incidents, from general policing practices, and from the lack of diversity on Ferguson’s police force.”

Dr. Farouk / Flickr Creative Commons

Like many municipal services, the St. Louis City and County Departments of Health operate separately.

Although the city and county collaborate and serve many of the same purposes, the divide may make it more difficult for the agencies to help residents. That's according to a report released Wednesday by the group ‘Better Together,’ a project that is exploring whether or not St. Louis county and city should consider altering merging various services.

National Seismic Hazard map of the continental United States, released in July of 2014. This view measures peak ground acceleration.
United States Geological Survey

Last week, a 6.1 magnitude earthquake in Napa, Calif. ripped through a region where less than 6 percent of homeowners and renters have earthquake insurance.

Could the same thing happen along the New Madrid Fault in southeastern Missouri?

Statewide, about one-third of Missourians are insured against earthquakes. But those who live in the most earthquake-prone areas are much less likely to have coverage.

An infrared photograph shows a water main leak in Webster Groves. Water utility companies photograph roads at night to determine which pipes may be in need of repair.
Missouri American Water | Provided

Water pipes in the St. Louis area are old … and getting older.

A report published Tuesday by a consortium of five St. Louis-area water utilities shows much of the area’s water system has outlived its expected lifetime:

  • Life expectancy for reservoirs and da

    ms ranges from 50 to 80 years. The average age of a St. Louis-area reservoir or dam is 80 years.

Jeffery Hill (left) and Taurean Russell speak discuss protester demands for the investigation into the shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown.
Durrie Bouscaren / St. Louis Public Radio

A coalition of Ferguson protesters met with reporters Friday to announce a list of demands related to the investigation of the shooting death of Michael Brown and to call for college students to participate in a national “Walk Out” from classes on Monday.

The group says it doesn't yet have a name, but those involved include members of the Organization for Black Struggle and Missourians Organizing for Reform and Empowerment. Meetings are held at Greater St. Mark’s Missionary Church near Ferguson.

Regina Greer of the United Way Coaches volunteers at the new community resource drop-in center at the Dellwood Community Center on August 21.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio / St. Louis Public Radio

In the past two weeks, residents in Ferguson have seen familiar businesses broken into and looted, heard gunshots at night and had to drive through police checkpoints to enter their neighborhoods. Some say their trust of law enforcement has been deeply shaken since the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown at the hands of a Ferguson police officer, Darren Wilson.

BreaDora, Marcus, theirBreaDora, Marcus, Jasmine and their mother Irma sit in their living room on August 17, 2014.  sister and their mother Irma in their living room Sunday night.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

When violence broke out in Ferguson late Sunday, St. Louis Public Radio reporters Stephanie Lecci and Durrie Bouscaren took refuge in a family’s home. Bouscaren asked them what life is like right now in the formerly quiet suburb.

We met the Moore family in the middle of the night, after running from tear gas and gunfire during Sunday night’s clash between police and protestors. Stranded miles away from our cars, we knocked on the door of a house with the lights still on. Irma Moore let us in.

  

Stephanie Lecci

Tear gas, gunshots and chaos engulfed a mile-long swath of Ferguson Sunday night as police and demonstrators engaged in a rolling confrontation that lasted for more than three hours. Early Monday, Gov. Jay Nixon signed an executive order directing the Missouri National Guard to restore "peace and order to this community."

Police said two or three people were shot by other demonstrators in the street. Seven or eight were arrested for failure to disperse.

In a statement released  shortly before 2 a.m., Nixon said:

Stephanie Lecci / St. Louis Public Radio

One man is in critical condition from a gunshot wound after a group of protesters in Ferguson defied the curfew imposed at midnight Saturday.

Missouri State Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson said police used smoke canisters and finally tear gas to disperse the group so that they could reach the gunshot victim. Johnson said the victim was found near the burned QuikTrip gas station that has become a staging area for many of the protests over the past week.

Protesters transported the victim to the hospital in their own vehicle, Johnson said.

Drummers attract a crowd during sixth night of demonstrations in Ferguson.
Durrie Bouscaren / St. Louis Public Radio

(Update: 3:53 p.m. Saturday) Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon on Saturday declared a state of emergency and said a curfew would be imposed in Ferguson from midnight to 5 a.m.

He made the announcement with Missouri Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson and several other officials at a tumultuous news conference at Greater St. Mark Family Church. Nixon has put Johnson and the patrol in charge of maintaining order in Ferguson, which has been at the center of unrest since a police shooting last Saturday killed 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Honking cars backed up traffic along West Florissant Avenue Friday evening.
Durrie Bouscaren / St. Louis Public Radio

After another night of looting, the union leader of the St. Louis County Police criticized the Missouri State Highway Patrol’s decision to respond to protests with a relaxed police presence.

“Even though they were very critical of the tactics used during the first four days, they are now using those same tactics once again,” Crocker said. “We have individuals who have been shot, officers who have been injured. People that have been assaulted and robbed.”

Protesters are greeted by lines of state and county police during a demonstration march on the Ferguson police station on August 11, 2014.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Armored cars, rubber bullets, riot shields and K-9 units have had a regular presence at demonstrations in Ferguson over the past week since a Ferguson police officer shot and killed an unarmed teenager, Michael Brown.

 

Thursday, Gov. Jay Nixon put the Missouri Highway Patrol in charge in Ferguson and called for a softer tone in the police presence.

Many are wondering if the police went overboard in using force against the crowds that have gathered in Ferguson every evening since Brown's death.

Ferguson police chief Tom Jackson at the microphone
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 9:30 p.m. with details from Chief Belmar on Wednesday morning's officer-involved shooting.

Ferguson police chief Thomas Jackson said he supports the city's call for limiting protests over the shooting death of an unarmed teenager to daylight hours only. 

Protests outside the police station and near the site of the shooting have been daily occurrences since Saturday, when a Ferguson police officer shot and killed Michael Brown. Some of the demonstrations have been broken up by police using tear gas and rubber bullets.

Protesters are greeted by a wall of police officers after a march to the Ferguson Police department on August 11, 2014.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI / UPI

The calls for greater representation of minorities in the region's law enforcement ranks have grown louder in the wake of the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown at the hands of a Ferguson police officer. Protesters want to see more minorities especially in the police departments serving predominantly African-American communities.

Two-thirds of Ferguson’s residents are black, according to 2013 census records. But there are only three African Americans on the city’s 53-member police force. The city council is also predominantly white, as is the mayor.

We're working to bring you the latest in the ongoing situation in Ferguson on our live blog. This map will be updated as we know more.

Now that the Supreme Court struck down a key section of the Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA, same-sex couples can apply for their foreign-born husbands, wives and fiancees to join them in the United States.

There are an estimated 28,000 gay and lesbian binational couples in the country, and for years many have been separated by immigration laws that didn't recognize their marriage.

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