Emanuele Berry | St. Louis Public Radio

Emanuele Berry

Emanuele Berry is a 2012 graduate of Michigan State University. Prior to coming to St. Louis she worked as a talk show producer at WKAR Public Radio in Michigan. Emanuele also interned at National Public Radio, where she worked at the Arts and Information Desk. Her work has been recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters, the Society of Professional Journalists, the Radio Television Digital News Association and the Hearst Journalism Awards Program. Berry worked with St. Louis Public Radio from 2014 to 2015.

Ferguson questions collage
Photos Provided And By Staff

Six months ago, on Aug. 9, 2014, Michael Brown and Officer Darren Wilson crossed paths on Canfield Drive in Ferguson, Mo. At the end of the encounter, Michael Brown was dead in the street, and life in the St. Louis region changed.

Missouri History Museum employees dig through ash and scrap metal for artifacts on Jan. 29, 2015, at the burned-out Fashions R Boutique in Ferguson.
Emanuele Berry / St. Louis Public Radio

Owner of Fashions R Boutique, Juanita Morris was stunned when she got the call that her shop was on fire.

“No, not my building,” Morris said. “But you know, I looked, the building next door was burning and the building across the street was burning, so I just said, 'Well I was just caught up in the middle'.”

Emanuele Berry | St. Louis Public Radio

Martin Luther King once said that "it is appalling that the most segregated hour of Christian America is 11 o'clock on Sunday morning."

Rev. Dietra Wise Baker says it still is, which is why Baker and more than 100 people from churches across St. Louis gathered to talk about race on Sunday. The event was the first in a series of Sacred Conversation About Race.

“The church has work to do on itself as it tries to call moral and ethical standards to the community and point the finger ...” she said. “We have to be on the road before we can invite people along for the journey.”

 the Rev. Dr. William G. Gillespie Residence Hall and Student Center at Harris-Stowe State University
Harris-Stowe State University website

After a heated exchange on Martin Luther King Day between protesters supporting “reclaimMLK” and Harris-Stowe State University students, the university and protesters are working to turn confrontation into conversation. On Tuesday student representatives and administrators met with a Ferguson activist to start a dialogue and “hopefully move forward as a community.”

The International Institute of St. Louis building.
File photo | Emanuele Berry | St. Louis Public Radio

Windows. That’s one of International Institute Director Anna Crosslin’s favorite parts of the International Institute of St. Louis’ new location. Its previous office building only had skylights on the second floor.

Marion S. Trikosko / Wikimedia Commons

A wide variety of St. Louis events are marking Martin Luther King Day. While many people will participate in marches (one starts at 11 a.m. at the Old Courthouse following a 9:30 a.m. program Jan. 19) and attend discussions, some will spend the day volunteering.

The slain civil rights leader was born on Jan. 15, 1929. He was assassinated on April 4, 1968.

Old North
Emanuele Berry | St. Louis Public Radio

Torn up nets, fading court lines, unkempt baseball fields, smashed slides, broken pavement, crumbling swing sets and a clogged sprinkler filled with trash and dead animals … these are just some of the problems facing a pair of parks in the Old North neighborhood of St. Louis. Problems area children are campaigning to fix. 

The Youth Council of Old North held a meeting Tuesday evening to campaign for the city to fix Strodtman and Jackson parks. The council, which is made up of young men from the neighborhood, was established this fall.

(St. Louis Public Radio file photo)

The Archdiocese of St. Louis has named a director for its re-established Peace and Justice Commission, also known as the human rights commission. Marie Kenyon will lead the group, which will address rights issues throughout the 11 counties that make up the Archdiocese of St. Louis. As director, Kenyon will build a commission that will address racial tensions, poverty and education access.

Berkeley website

The Metropolitan St. Louis Equal Housing Opportunity Council has filed a fair housing complaint against the city of Berkeley. The complaint stems from a dispute over the type of identification needed for occupancy permits in Berkley.

According to city ordinances, individuals can use U.S. or foreign issued IDs to apply for permits needed to live in Berkeley.

From  left, Stephanie Lecci, Willis Ryder Arnold, Emanuele Berry, Durrie Bouscaren. Wayne Pratt was not available for this photo.
St. Louis Public Radio

This summer, the newsroom of St. Louis Public Radio hired five people who had never lived in St. Louis. As 2014 draws to a close, we asked each to reflect on what they've discovered in their five months here.

Emanuele Berry | St. Louis Public Radio

An investigation by the Berkeley police department says it has confirmed that Antonio Martin pointed a gun at the officer who fatally shot him last Tuesday.

At a news conference this morning, Berkeley Police Chief Frank McCall said several witnesses told police that Martin pointed a gun at the officer. Those witnesses, police said, included the individual who was with Martin at the gas station where the shooting occurred.

Courtesy of Michael Hanscom via Flicker

It’s been 35 years since the the song “Rapper's Delight” made its debut on the radio, yet the track still holds a unique magic. It was one of the first commercial successes for rap music and it got its radio start in East St. Louis.

The mere mention of its title sends people stumbling through the opening lyric:

"I said a hip hop,

Hippie to the hippie,

The hip, hip a hop, and you don't stop, a rock it

To the bang bang boogie, say, up jump the boogie,

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, right, swears in the members of the commission. Nov. 19
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Three hundred people answered Gov. Jay Nixon's call to apply for the Ferguson Commission. Of those applicants and others, the governor selected 16 and announced their names on Tuesday. The group includes teachers, attorneys, community organizers, law enforcement officials and protesters from across the region. It has nine blacks and seven whites; six women and 10 men.

Mark Parkinson, r St. Charles 2014
Official state photo

Legislation introduced earlier this week would require businesses to certify their employees' resident status using the federal electronic verification system. Supporters of the bill hope it will discourage illegal immigration.

Emanuele Berry/St. Louis Public Radio

Tigrinya, Nepali, Somali, Arabic, Vietnamese: These are just some of the languages that clashed as translators relayed information about becoming a U.S. citizens to more than 100 lawful permanent residents. Many of those in attendance at the St. Louis International Institute event were refugees.

The information session covered requirements for becoming a citizen, the application process, classes available at the International Institute to help prepare for the citizenship interview, medical waiver information and success stories.

welcometoUSA.gov

President Barack Obama’s executive order on immigration could impact foreign-born entrepreneurs looking to invest in St. Louis.

At a panel discussion Wednesday, legal experts addressed the potential benefits of the executive order and current visa options for foreign investors. The event was part of the Advance St. Louis Seminar Series, a collaboration between the Center for Emerging Technologies and the Polsinelli law firm.

Ferguson Davis
Emanuele Berry | St. Louis Public Radio

Tasha Davis, executive pastor at the Flood Christian Church, started Sunday service as she usually does, with prayer. But this Sunday’s service was different.

Just feet away, the cinder block building that once housed the Flood Christian Church is destroyed, still marked with black ash from a fire set during chaos last Monday evening. That night, St. Louis County Prosecutor Robert McCulloch had announced the grand jury's decision to not indict police officer Darren Wilson in connection with the shooting death of Michael Brown.

St. Louis Galleria die-in 11-28-14. Part of the Black Fri
Emanuele Berry/St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at midnight

Shoppers who wanted to find some deals at the St. Louis Galleria found themselves out of luck Friday, as the mall temporarily closed its doors following a peaceful protest over the grand jury's decision to not indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson.

About 200 protesters marched, sang, and chanted for nearly two hours. Police stood back and allowed the protests to happen. There were no arrests reported. A large number of stores locked their doors during the demonstration.

Camille Phillips/St. Louis Public Radio

A fire that destroyed a church during Monday night’s chaos in Ferguson is being investigation by the 

U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. Burning a church is a federal offense. Investigators said that the fire at the Flood Christian Church was intentionally set.

The Flood Christian Church is just a mile outside of Ferguson. The Rev. Carlton Lee was in shock when he got the call Monday night telling him his church was on fire.

Michael Broadnax, Paris Billops and her son Cameron
Emanuele Berry | St. Louis Public Radio

Many storefronts in Ferguson have been boarded up with plywood. Some are temporary fixes for windows broken during chaotic demonstrations, while other stores boarded up as a preventative measure.

“You know the plywood is kind of depressing,” said Ferguson Resident Leah Bailey.

On Thanksgiving, her family did something about the depressing boards -- painted murals. Bailey says she can’t imagine spending her Thanksgiving any other way.

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