Erin Williams

Fellowship Producer

Erin Williams has joined St Louis Public Radio as a Fellowship Producer, where she will be creating stories centered around regional race matters, as well as diversity and culture. Prior to arriving in St. Louis, Erin Worked as an editorial aide and staff writer at The Washington Post, covering arts, culture, and entertainment for the Style section and was a reporter for the site The Root – DC. She also produced the Friday ‘NewsViews’ roundtable segment for WPFW-FM under the tutelage of veteran journalist Askia Muhammad. She graduated from The University of Alabama with a degree in Telecommunication and Film. During her undergraduate years, Erin interned at Alabama Public Radio, and spent part of the summer of 2008 as an congressional intern for Artur Davis.  

Erin enjoys traveling and road trips, live shows, exploring museums, and finding the best that every city she inhabits has to offer.

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Features
4:00 am
Tue February 5, 2013

Journalist Soledad O'Brien Can't Be Put Into One Box

CNN journalist Soledad O'Brien is known for her stories on politics and shedding light on the plight of minorities in America.
Credit Courtesy CNN

As an author and reporter for over two decades, CNN journalist Soledad O’Brien has made her career in reporting on all things diverse - African Americans, Muslims, Gays, Hispanics, and numerous other aspects that compose American culture. As an author and reporter for over two decades, she has employed a practice of simply trying to getting answers to questions, no matter how challenging they may be to ask.

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Cityscape
3:39 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

'As If We Weren't There' Depicts African Americans Outside Of The Spotlight

Images of African Americans in everyday life compose the exhibit of 'As If We Weren't There,' curated by Deborah Nelson Link of the Hands On Black History Museum.
Courtesy of the Hands On Black History Museum

When Deborah Nelson Linck, curator of the Hands On Black History Museum, found a collection of antique photos of African Americans at a mall last summer, she bought them - both out of novelty, and awe.

It was rare for her to find antique photos of black people in such ordinary settings - off to war, with friends, standing next to new cars - like she did for other races, and she knew that there was something to be done with her discovery.

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St. Louis on the Air
5:11 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

What Was It Like To Be Mrs. Lincoln's Dressmaker?

Mrs. Mary Todd Lincoln
Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

In the mid-1800s Elizabeth Keckley was a slave living in St. Louis.

As a highly skilled dressmaker, she was eventually able to earn the money to buy her freedom.

New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Chiaverini is the author of a new book about Elizabeth Keckley.  She writes about Keckley moving from St. Louis to Washington D.C. and becoming First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln’s personal dressmaker.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Erin Williams talked with Chiaverini about her new book, “Mrs. Lincoln’s Dressmaker.”

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Politics
3:42 pm
Fri January 18, 2013

Missourians For Equality Hold Petition Kickoff To Change State Nondiscrimination Policy

Nonpartisan PAC Missourians For Equality is pushing to include gender identity and sexual discrimination into the state's nondiscrimination policy.
Credit via Flickr/BluEyedA73

The gay and lesbian community is pushing to be included in a state law to protect against discrimination. The nonpartisan political action committee Missourians for Equality is kicking off its statewide petition drive in several areas across

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Features
8:32 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Does The Legacy Of American Martin Luther King Jr. Mean Anything If You're Not From America?

Martin Luther King Jr., here in 1964, would have been 84 January 16.
Credit Wikimedia Commons/Library of Congress

Americans are well-aware of the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King. His fight for justice was aimed at changing the world, but during the fifties and sixties sought to resonate most heavily in his home country. Today his legacy has been celebrated tenfold – there are numerous streets and landmarks dedicated in his honor, the government designated his birthday as a national holiday in 1986, and just last year he became the first African American to have a monument designed in his honor on the National Mall.

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Features
5:08 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

Christ Church Cathedral Hosts Public Reading Of King's Speeches For Fourth Year

Martin Luther King, Jr. gesturing at freedom rally at Washington Temple Church, 1962. King would have been 84 January 15.
Credit Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

The third Monday in January may be marked as a National Day of Service, but Christ Church Cathedral is remembering the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King with a day of speech and reflection in order to spur change. The Cathedral is giving citizens an opportunity to listen and read a selection of his speeches aloud. “Let Freedom Ring” began four years ago after the very reverend Mike Kinman, dean of Christ Church Cathedral, realized there was no element of reflection evident in the service projects that others were completing.

“What it is, is it gives a foundation of reflection so that we can consider what that work is,” he said. “He never was an activist for activism’s sake. Everything was thoughtful, prayerful, reasoned, considered.” The day is not a discouragement to performing public service, however. “What we are hoping that people will do is embody that in their lives…do your five hours at the soup kitchen, then come here and speak these words, and consider what it was that you were doing, and consider what more it is that you are called to do,” says Kinman.

The program will be held from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. in the nave of the Cathedral. Participants can choose to read aloud, volunteer to man a 30 minute shift, or simply listen at any time during the day.

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Features
6:40 am
Tue January 15, 2013

After 32 Years At Annie Malone, Former CEO Angela L. Starks Stands By Her Work

Annie Malone headquarters, located in The Ville neighborhood.
Credit Douglas Duckworth

In the 32 years she has worked for the Annie Malone Children and Family Service Center, former CEO Angela Starks has always made serving both the community both in and outside of the building her main priority.

She stepped down in December, with her role to be carried on by Darryl Wise, who has worked with Annie Malone for the past five years. When she first began her work as a therapist, Starks was amaze by how dedicated her coworkers were to providing help to their young patrons.

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Cityscape
11:29 am
Fri January 11, 2013

Painting Possibilities: St. Louis Artist Depicts African American Fathers With Their Children

Painting 111/365..."Never Gonna Let You Go"
Cbabi Bayoc | 365 Days With Dad

For the past year, artist and businessman Cbabi Bayoc has attempted to create a portrait a day of a father interacting with his kid.

The resulting project, titled “365 Days With Dad,” goes beyond showing fathers who go through the motions of parenthood, and shows engaging and teachable moments.

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Features
4:07 pm
Tue January 8, 2013

Events Guide: Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. In St. Louis

Martin Luther King, 1964. King would have been 83 on January 15.
Credit Wikimedia Commons/Library of Congress

Celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr by attending several events that will be hosted throughout the area. Occasions include lectures, discussions, music performances, and marches.

All events are free unless otherwise stated.

Know of another event worth adding? Send to Erin Williams at ewilliams@stlpublicradio.org

January 12

Women Who Dare To Dream

Harris-Stowe State University hosts the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. State Celebration Commission of Missouri’s State Celebration kickoff event. The Trumpet Awards Foundation’s CEO, executive producer, founder, and president Xernona Clayton will deliver the keynote address.

6:30 p.m. Harris-Stowe State University’s Main Auditorium

*January 14

"Monday Movie Madness"

St. Louis Public Library honors the legacy of Dr. King with their weekly movie series. On this day they are screening the documentary “Good Day To Die,” which tells the story of Native American Dennis Banks, co-founder of the American Indian Movement.  Refreshments and discussion to follow.

6 p.m., Schlafly Branch - 225 North Euclid Avenue

January 17

St. Louis Jewish Book Festival presents a discussion with author and Rabbi Ben Kamin and Black Repertory Company founder Ron Himes on civil rights and social justice. Includes presentation in honor of Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis President & CEO Dr. James Buford for his work in helping to solidify African American and Jewish relations.

$8, 7 p.m. at Jewish Community Center’s Staenberg Family Complex

2 Millstone Campus Drive
Tickets: brownpapertickets.com/event/310382

January 18

"Where Justice & Charity Meet: Fighting Hunger In St. Louis"

A roundtable discussion on fighting hunger in St. Louis, with a keynote address to be given by Jeanne Mott Oxford, executive director of the Missouri Association for Social Welfare.

Norman K Probstein Golf Course, Forest Park

8 a.m. – Noon

$10

Register by emailing hungerstlouis@gmail.com


January 18 and 21

“Overcoming Inequality…Embracing Diversity”

Barnes-Jewish and St Louis Children’s Hospitals present Reverend Michele Sue, the first black woman elder ordained in Missouri United Methodism on January 18; and past president and founding member of the National Black Sisters Conference Sister Mary Antona Ebo, FSM, on January 21.

January 18 at St. Louis Children’s Hospital, third floor auditorium

January 21, Noon at the Eric P. Newman Education Center, 320 South Euclid

Noon, with 11:30 a.m. music prelude at both events

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Features
9:58 am
Wed January 2, 2013

Born and Raised: Tara Mahadevan

Tara Mahadevan.
(via YouTube video by Erin Williams/St. Louis Public Radio)

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