Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Evie Hemphill

Talk Show Producer

Evie Hemphill joined the St. Louis on the Air team in February 2018. After earning a bachelor’s degree in English literature in 2005, she started her career as a reporter for the Westminster Window in Colorado. Several years later she went on to pursue graduate work in creative writing at the University of Wyoming and moved to St. Louis upon earning an MFA in the spring of 2010. She worked as writer and editor for Washington University Libraries until 2014 and then spent several more years in public relations for the University of Missouri–St. Louis before making the shift to St. Louis Public Radio.

When she’s not helping to produce the talk show, Evie can typically be found navigating the city sans car, volunteering for St. Louis BWorks or trying to get the majority of the dance steps correct as a member of the Thunder & Lightning Cloggers of Southern Illinois. She’s married to Joe, cat-mom to Dash and rather obsessive about doubt, certitude and the places where refuge and risk intersect.

Josephine Baker, who grew up in the Mill Creek Valley neighborhood and lived much of her adult life in France, is the focus of an episode of “The Nod.”
Jac. de Nijs | Dutch National Archives

Josephine Baker is remembered for being many different things over the course of her remarkable life – a burlesque performer, a film actress, an activist, even a war hero. Less well known is the St. Louis-born celebrity’s role as a mother to 12 ethnically diverse children she began adopting in the 1950s as her “rainbow tribe.”

“The Pirates of Penzance” will drop anchor at the Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center on Friday. As they do so, they’ll have Mark Hanna, the very model of a modern pirate expert, accompanying them on stage.

The University of California San Diego faculty member is in town to give pre-show talks throughout the weekend as a University of Missouri–St. Louis cast of singing seadogs, star-crossed lovers and mermaids perform the humorous Gilbert and Sullivan opera.

He also joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Thursday for a conversation all about pirates – those that sailed the seas centuries ago and in more contemporary times.

St. Louis residents and community leaders (from left) Kevin McKinney, Al Willis and Sal Martinez discussed the goals of the Neighborhoods United for Change initiative.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

It takes less than 20 minutes to drive between the Lewis Place and Holly Hills neighborhoods in St. Louis. Yet that relatively short trip from north to south  – or vice versa – is one that many people in the Gateway region are unlikely to take.

That’s according to Lewis Place resident Al Willis, who took a bus tour of Holly Hills along with a group of his neighbors in an effort to bridge economic, racial and geographic divides around the region. A contingent of Holly Hills residents participated in a tour of Lewis Place on the same day, and for both groups the experience proved eye-opening.

Tuesday’s conversation touched on the now (in)famous concrete spheres that line Compton Avenue as well as other traffic-calming efforts in the region.
Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

Kea Wilson has heard her share of complaints about the so-called “Ingrassia balls” recently installed in her south city neighborhood along Compton Avenue.

Some people worry about the concrete spheres being hit by vehicles and rolling down the street, as several in fact have. But Wilson, director of community engagement for the organization Strong Towns, said on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air that there’s a more serious issue at stake.

U.S. Army veterans (from left) Emily Staden, Jim Craig and Angie Peacock discussed their experiences and observations of trends in the military, at home and in higher education.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Women make up 14 percent of the U.S. military as well as a full quarter of the veterans who are pursuing a college education upon returning home from service. In the St. Louis area alone, evidence of their significant presence isn’t hard to come by.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with three local Army veterans about that growing force and about how St. Louis’ student veterans are collaborating as they plan for this year’s Student Veterans Week festivities set to begin March 17.

Dan Simmons of United Steelworkers Local 1899 discussed what led to the announcement that U.S. Steel will be rehiring as many as 500 Illinois workers – and what’s next for the plant.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Ecstatic – that’s the word that Dan Simmons used to describe the mood in Granite City, Illinois, this week.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, the United Steelworkers Local 1899 president joined host Don Marsh to discuss the news that up to 500 workers will return to work at the steel mill around which the town was built.

Cory Finley has said that his best writing comes from fear, and his new movie “Thoroughbreds” is no exception. The two characters at the center of the darkly comic film first emerged from deep-seated suspicions about his own emotional instincts and moral decision-making.

This Friday, several years since the story first entered Finley’s mind, his tightly wound tale is opening in theaters across the country. That includes several in St. Louis, where Finley was born and raised.

David Miller is a professor at the University of Pittsburgh and the organizing force behind CONNECT, an alliance of Pittsburgh and 40 surrounding municipalities.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

The fact that the St. Louis region encompasses nearly 90 municipalities comes up frequently in discussions about how the metropolitan area can move forward – and is sometimes cited as an explanation for regional challenges.

But David Miller doesn’t blink at that statistic.

Miller’s home city, Pittsburgh, and its surrounding Allegheny County have St. Louis beat when it comes to lots of local governments, with a total of 130 municipalities within their Western Pennsylvania bounds.

Paul Artspace’s Mike Behle (at left) and David Johnson, both artists in their own right, share a passion for providing other creative people with opportunities to help them succeed in their endeavors.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

When Mike Behle decided to transform his family’s quiet property in Florissant, Missouri, into a unique resource for artists, he didn’t know exactly how that vision would take shape. But he was certain of one thing: a desire to provide people with time and space.

Andrew Oberle, a chimp attack survivor who helped create a holistic trauma program at Saint Louis University, shared his story at a live taping of The Story Collider in October 2017.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Even as a young boy, Andrew Oberle knew exactly what he wanted to do for a living: work with chimpanzees. He was living his dream six years ago at an animal sanctuary in South Africa when tragedy struck.

Oberle recounted his survival of a near-fatal attack by chimpanzees, along with his experience along the road to recovery, during a Story Collider event this past fall. The piece also aired on Monday’s St. Louis on the Air.

Tim Bono is the author of “When Likes Aren’t Enough: A Crash Course in the Science of Happiness.” He says he is not on Instagram.  He does admit to operating a Twitter account – but only because his book publisher insisted.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Are we as happy as we appear to be on social media?

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh explored that question and others in conversation with Tim Bono, a faculty member at Washington University. The psychologist’s new book “When Likes Aren’t Enough: A Crash Course in the Science of Happiness” draws on scores of happiness-related studies conducted with college students and other adults throughout the world.

Chris Begley, an associate professor of anthropology at Transylvania University in Kentucky, discusses what real archaeologists think of the beloved fictional adventurer.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

In his 25 years as a terrestrial and underwater archaeologist, Chris Begley has explored everything from prehistoric caves in Missouri to the legend of a lost civilization in Honduras. Along the way, he’s earned not just a Ph.D. but a reputation as “a real-life Indiana Jones.”

But on Friday, Begley downplayed the more daring aspects of his own adventures during a conversation with St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh. He said his field work in relatively uninhabited areas of Central America as well as other places around the world doesn’t quite live up to what’s typically portrayed on the big screen.

Cider flights are among the offerings on tap at Brick River Cider Co., one of four must-try places on Sauce Magazine's latest Hit List.
Michelle Volansky | Sauce Magazine

The first question that St. Louis on the Air’s Don Marsh asked the Sauce Magazine team during Friday’s Hit List segment had to do with the word “cidery.”

The term was new to Marsh and understandably so, with St. Louis’ first such cider-focused brewery opening just about a week ago. Located in a former firehouse on Washington Avenue, Brick River Cider Co. was the first of four new, must-try restaurants that Catherine Klene and Matt Sorrell plugged during the discussion.

This post was updated following the March 5 show.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Tim Bono, a psychologist and faculty member at Washington University, about his new book “When Likes Aren’t Enough: A Crash Course in the Science of Happiness.”

Listen to and read about the full conversation here.

Former Mayor Raymond Tucker (at right) and then-civic leader and bond issue chairman Sidney Maestre look out over an area of Mill Creek Valley slated for clearance in this photograph from 1956.
Missouri Historical Society

Gwen Moore can rattle off the names of all sorts of characters who once walked the streets of Mill Creek Valley, a historic St. Louis neighborhood demolished in the name of urban renewal in the late 1950s.

General William T. Sherman lived in Mill Creek at one point. The poet Walt Whitman stayed there during trips to visit his brother, and the owner of the Daily Missouri Republican also called the community home.

The 1.5-million-gallon aquarium opened in September 2017, featuring about 800 different species of fish, mammals, reptiles, amphibians and birds.
Wonders of Wildlife

Marine life probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind as a distinguishing characteristic of Missouri. But a wide variety of both freshwater and saltwater species now have a presence just a few hours southwest of St. Louis.

Shelby Stephenson joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh this week to talk about Wonders of Wildlife, a new aquarium adjoined to Bass Pro Shops’ national headquarters in Springfield.

Longtime St. Louis meteorologist Cindy Preszler now runs WeatherSTL.com.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Despite a warming world, there’s little chance of weather becoming unpredictable – or at least less predictable than it already is. That’s according to new research from the University of Missouri’s School of Natural Resources.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with local meteorologist Cindy Preszler about the findings – along with Anthony Lupo, a professor of atmospheric science who helped lead the study.

Culinary professionals Alex Feick (at left) and Josh Charles (center) joined Sauce Magazine editor Catherine Klene to talk about how they manage demanding careers alongside parenthood and other aspects of their lives.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Like many new parents, Josh Charles sensed that a major switch had been flipped the moment his baby was born 11 months ago. He knew right away that the days ahead would look different for him, professionally speaking, than the previous decade he’d spent cooking in fine-dining kitchens.

“The typical restaurant hours were just something that I could not do anymore,” the chef said this week on St. Louis on the Air. “I had been used to working Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. at minimum, and I just knew that being locked into that restaurant wasn’t going to be cohesive for the hours that I needed to be there for my family.”

The prolific author and TV and radio host will speak at 8 p.m. Feb. 20 at Powell Hall.
Rick Steves’ Europe

With more than 50 guidebooks to his name, Rick Steves is a go-to authority on international travel – particularly when it comes to Europe. But whether one’s destination is Italy or India, his main piece of advice is to travel thoughtfully.

“You just have to decide,” Steves said in a St. Louis on the Air interview just prior to his Feb. 20 visit to the Gateway City as part of the St. Louis Speakers Series. “Do you want to lie on the beach with a bunch of other Americans, or do you want to actually get out into the local culture and check things out?”

via Saint Raphael the Archangel Catholic Church

The mother of a south St. Louis woman believed to have shot her infant, her husband and herself earlier this month says that her daughter suffered from postpartum depression.

“There’s no doubt about it,” Polly Fick told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Thursday when asked if her daughter had postpartum depression. “But because of her background and working as a social worker, I think she was of the opinion that she could handle things.”

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