Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Evie Hemphill

St. Louis on the Air Producer

Evie Hemphill joined the St. Louis on the Air team in February 2018. After earning a bachelor’s degree in English literature in 2005, she started her career as a reporter for the Westminster Window in Colorado. Several years later she went on to pursue graduate work in creative writing at the University of Wyoming and moved to St. Louis upon earning an MFA in the spring of 2010. She worked as writer and editor for Washington University Libraries until 2014 and then spent several more years in public relations for the University of Missouri–St. Louis before making the shift to St. Louis Public Radio.

When she’s not helping to produce the talk show, Evie can typically be found navigating the city sans car, volunteering for St. Louis BWorks or trying to get the majority of the dance steps correct as a member of the Thunder & Lightning Cloggers of Southern Illinois. She’s married to Joe, cat-mom to Dash and rather obsessive about doubt, certitude and the places where refuge and risk intersect.

Joshua Johnson took a break from his live “1A” broadcasts from St. Louis on May 3 and 4 to talk host to host with Don Marsh on “St. Louis on the Air.”
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Joshua Johnson’s brief stay in the Gateway City this week didn’t allow him a whole lot of time for touristy exploring, as the popular host of WAMU’s daily radio production 1A was busy broadcasting the morning show live from St. Louis Public Radio on May 3 and 4.

But what Johnson did see during his visit to the city, particularly within the Grand Center Arts District, left him plenty impressed.

“There’s a lot here – you could make a vacation to St. Louis,” he said on Friday’s St. Louis on the Air shortly after wrapping up 1A for the day. “There’s that much. It’s rich with culture and art and museums and things to do and things to see, in addition to all of the legacy issues and challenges that St. Louis is trying to address.

Angela da Silva discussed the many ways in which racism, segregation and prejudice showed up at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition that took place in St. Louis at the beginning of the 20th century.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

There’s debate about some of the stories associated with the international event that had St. Louis buzzing more than a century ago, such as whether the 1904 World’s Fair was really the point at which ice cream and other treats were invented.

But one thing that historians do know for sure about the seven-month-long spectacle is that it was marked by blatant racism.

Audra McDonald
Autumn de Silva

When Audra McDonald reflects on the relentless pace of her years performing on Broadway and in many other venues over the course of her career, the sport of baseball comes to mind as a fitting comparison.

“Your entire day, every single day, is about [keeping] my body and my health in optimal shape so that I can do the show, because our bodies are our instruments,” the six-time Tony Award-winning singer and actress said on this week’s St. Louis on the Air.

Chris Bay, Rory Kennedy and Tom Kroenung joined host Don Marsh to talk about the digital divide.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Smartphones, tablet computers and other internet-oriented devices fill today’s digital age, and yet access to these common technologies is not universal.

A full quarter of Americans were still without broadband as of about a year ago, according to TIME, and many U.S. young people experience what has become known as the digital divide on a daily basis in their schools throughout the country.

Legal experts (from left) William Freivogel, Mark Smith and Brenda Talent touched on developments in the cases involving the Missouri governor as well as other matters pertaining to the law.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the two felony charges facing Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens as well as other items of local interest pertaining to the law.

Three legal experts joined the conversation, which started with a look at the latest developments in the invasion-of-privacy case against Greitens. One focus of the discussion had to do with the judge’s ruling that the woman who was involved with Greitens must turn over her phone for a forensic investigation.

Courtesy of U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay’s office

In 2016, a painting by St. Louis high school student David Pulphus appeared in the U.S. Capitol alongside hundreds of other winning art competition entries. About seven months later, after pressure from a group of Republican lawmakers with backing from law enforcement, the artwork was removed from display.

Gubernatorial candidate Eric Greitens looks at his ballot before sitting down to vote at the St. Louis Public Library in the Central West End on Tuesday.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Behind the Headlines covered two topics on Friday’s St. Louis on the Air.

St. Louis Public Radio reporter Rachel Lippmann joined host Don Marsh to discuss the legal and political situations involving Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

Local college students (from left) Dre Williams, Ryan Bieri and Daniel Redeffer discussed the ongoing budget crisis in higher education and its impact on the public institutions where they are pursuing degrees.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Public colleges and universities throughout the U.S. are relying more and more on student tuition and fees to make ends meet, and institutions in the St. Louis region have been no exception to that trend.

Just in the past few weeks, money squabbles within the Southern Illinois University System have made headlines, as did a University of Missouri­-St. Louis committee report that recommends investing in some academic areas while eliminating others, including theater, anthropology and more.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the impact of higher education’s ongoing budget crisis on those at the heart of the whole matter: the students.

Local residents (from left) Heather Silverman, Jami Dolby and Kara Wurtz recently ran for city council seats in Creve Coeur, Chesterfield and Kirkwood, respectively.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

“Last year I marched, but this year I run,” Kara Wurtz told her friends and family this past January 21, the day she launched her campaign as a city council candidate in Kirkwood, Missouri. She’s among an increasing number of women getting involved in politics all across the country and the region.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Wurtz and two other women who recently ran for their respective city councils in Chesterfield, Creve Coeur and Kirkwood, Missouri, about what prompted their candidacies and how they hope to engage in their local communities going forward.

Bill Nye is making a keynote appearance at the St. Louis Climate Summit.
Bill Nye

On this week’s St. Louis on the Air, St. Louis Public Radio science reporter Eli Chen spoke with Bill Nye ahead of his keynote appearance Monday evening as part of the three-day St. Louis Climate Summit at Saint Louis University.

Their conversation touched on how the Science Guy seeks to engage audiences of all ages around topics such as climate change as well as the importance of critical thinking and storytelling.

Gary Gackstatter (at left) composed "Symphony Chaco: A Journey of the Spirit." Choral director Jim Henry  (at right) and renowned Native American flutist R. Carlos Nakai are helping him bring the piece to the Touhill stage next week.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Jim Henry has yet to visit New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon, the hallowed, high-desert landscape once home to ancestral Pueblo tribes. But the choral director has already fallen in love with the place, as have his music students at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

That’s due to a new symphony inspired by Chaco from local composer Gary Gackstatter, who is a music professor at St. Louis Community College-Meramec. On Monday, April 23, about 200 singers and instrumentalists from UMSL and from STLCC will perform the symphony during a free concert at the Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center.

“When I [first] played this piece for my students, they just could not wait to get on the stage,” Henry told host Don Marsh this week on St. Louis on the Air.

Carl Kasell throws out the first pitch on April 14, 2010, at Busch Stadium.
File photo | Bill Greenblatt | UPI

In tribute to NPR’s Carl Kasell, who passed away earlier this week, Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air included a segment in remembrance of the longtime newscaster and much-beloved radio personality.

The broadcast featured portions of a 2006 conversation between Kasell and St. Louis Public Radio host Steve Potter. During the interview, Kasell reflected on his decades in the radio business and the growth of NPR since he first joined the organization in 1975.

St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson was sworn into office a year ago, on April 18, 2017.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Wednesday marked the first anniversary of St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson’s time in office. The first woman elected to lead the Gateway City, she joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh for a conversation both reflecting on her first 12 months in the role and looking ahead.

In addition to saying she will sign current aldermanic legislation that would, respectively, give subpoena power to the Civilian Oversight Board and increase workforce inclusion goals, Krewson touched on the effort to create a buffer zone around St. Louis’ Planned Parenthood facility in the Central West End.

She also responded to a wide variety of other questions from Marsh and from listeners. Ten of them are included below – along with the full conversation here:

Beth Maynor Finch

Edward O. Wilson’s long career has been marked by enormous contributions to the field of biology, with an impact on global conservation efforts that is difficult to overstate. All of it grew out of his close attention years ago to something relatively small: the behavior of ants.

Wilson recalled one of his earliest interactions with the insects, a memory from his boyhood in northern Alabama, on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air in conversation with host Don Marsh.

Elsa Hart’s third historical mystery featuring librarian-turned-detective Li Du, titled “City of Ink,” is set for release this August. A fourth novel is also in the works.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

When Elsa Hart moved to St. Louis and set out to earn a law degree from Washington University, becoming a novelist wasn’t at the top of her agenda. But then neither did Li Du, the protagonist of her since-published historical mysteries, expect to morph into a detective.

Trained as an imperial librarian in early 18th-century China, the fictional character winds up solving crimes in the midst of an ancient eclipse of the sun and other unexpectedly fraught adventures. Li Du is the central character in both Hart’s debut, “Jade Dragon Mountain” (2015), and its sequel, “The White Mirror” (2016), and still more surprises await him and his associates.

Harvard University’s Jonathan Walton will discuss “Religion at a Conversation Starter! Embracing King’s Political Philosophy of ‘Somebodiness’” on Tuesday, April 17, at Wash U.
Jeffrey Blackwell | Harvard University

Religion and politics don’t always pair well, and both have a reputation as conversation stoppers. But so much of the work of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. occurred at the intersection of those two often-avoided topics, and his efforts were part of a tradition that lives on.

“I’m thinking, for example, of folks here in St. Louis, names like Rev. Traci Blackmon, Rabbi Susan Talve,” said Lerone Martin, a Washington University faculty member who joined St. Louis on the Air on Thursday for a discussion of King’s legacy. “And even more broadly in the U.S. we can think about someone like Rev. [William] Barber, who’s trying to plan a poor people’s campaign in a similar tradition and vein.”

Saint Louis University faculty member Cara Wallace offered ideas for why – and how – people can broach important topics related to end-of-life care.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air included the sort of conversation that often doesn’t happen as often or as early as it should among loved ones – the kind about planning for the end of life.

Joining host Don Marsh for the discussion was Cara Wallace, an assistant professor in the School of Social Work at Saint Louis University.

Her research focuses on overcoming barriers to end-of-life care as well as improving quality of life, and she also educates health-care students, professionals and the general public about facing issues surrounding death, illness, loss and grief.

UMSL criminologists Lee Slocum (at left) and Finn Esbensen discussed a variety of safety issues that students and teachers deal with daily.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Mass shootings in U.S. schools continue to occur and make headlines. Other types of school violence, typically affecting one or two students at a time, garner less attention and more often end in suicide than homicide.

That’s according to University of Missouri–St. Louis criminologist Finn Esbensen, whose recent research in St. Louis County schools alongside colleague Lee Ann Slocum suggests that many young people struggle with school attendance out of fear for their safety.

SLU soccer stand-out Saadiq Mohammed (at left) and local attorney Javad Khazaeli talked about how they’ve been impacted by recent shifts in U.S. policy.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis has been home to Saadiq Mohammed for about three years now – ever since he fled Somalia to seek safety and education in the United States. But along with college coursework and soccer at Saint Louis University these days, Mohammed has something else weighing on his mind on a daily basis: whether his request for asylum will be approved.

“It’s really tough,” he told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh during Monday’s show. “Every day I think about it a lot … When you wake up, you don’t know what’s going to happen.”

Immigration scholars (from left) Jorg Ploger, Adriano Udani and Florian Sichling discussed the incorporation of immigrants and refugees into their respective communities.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Thousands of miles separate St. Louis, Missouri, from Dortmund, Germany, but when it comes to immigration and refugee resettlement, the two cities aren’t so far apart.

Among the most pressing debates that link them are the “politically contradicting messages about the purpose of immigration,” as Florian Sichling describes the issue.

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