Evita Caldwell | St. Louis Public Radio

Evita Caldwell

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This St. Louis on the Air program will be re-broadcast on Monday, May 30 at noon. You can listen live online here. It was initially aired on July 22, 2015. 

During the summer and fall of 1948, President Harry S. Truman’s risky journey toward a second term turned out to be one of his greatest campaigning decisions.

After a 31,000-mile train ride across the country and 352 speeches during what’s known as his “Whistle Stop Tour,” Truman won the presidential election against then New York Governor Thomas Dewey.

Áine O'Connor

When mentioning author and philanthropist Cynthia Kagan Frohlichstein, the best word that comes to mind is “spunk.” You can spot her around town at different events, chatting and mingling, owning the crowd.

And frankly, she has much to celebrate.

Celebrating her 40th year of being cancer-free, Frohlichstein has not slowed down her attempts at showing the world that giving is as good as receiving. She’s written children’s books on the topic of “giving back” and life lessons in hopes that young people will carry the torch forward.

Bob Kramer Marionnettes
Alex Heuer

Over fifty years ago, a St. Louis-based company set out to keep age-old children’s stories alive, literally.

Bob Kramer’s Marionnettes” serves as one of the longest running puppetry theatres in the United States. Combining humor with storytelling, Kramer’s production pieces come to life to provide entertainment for audiences of all ages.

Kathryn Nahorski, Executive Director, St. Louis Artists' Guild
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

On the brink of its 130th anniversary, The Artists’ Guild, St. Louis’ longest running art organization, relocated to the old Famous-Barr building in downtown Clayton from its old Oak Knoll Park location.

Just a few weeks after the move, executive director Kathryn Nahorski has exciting plans for the organization.

"The Next Great Burger"
Courtesy of Coolfire Studios

Coolfire Studios, best known for their local production of “Welcome to Sweetie Pies,” embarked on a new project to boost their place in brand entertainment.

On July 21, the Esquire Network premiered Coolfire’s newest production “The Next Great Burger.” In association with Budweiser, the competition show seeks to discover the best burger chef in the country.

Raymond Evans,left; Paul Jordan, right
Alex Heuer

Every day, billions of internet users are inevitably vulnerable to hackers from across the world.

While regular citizens are susceptible to attacks, so is the government. Professionals at Scott Air Force Base are tasked with ensuring our systems are secure and some of those airmen are passionate about cybersecurity outside of work, and on a personal level.

Michael Velardo | Flickr

In St. Louis County, 36 people have died from a heroin overdose this year. Although the number is a 23 percent decrease from the 47 fatalities reported last June, there is still much to overcome.

Casey Lambert, a detective with the St. Louis County Police Department Bureau of Drug Enforcement, explained that raising awareness and reaching the right crowd is difficult. Many of the citizens who succumb to heroin addiction are often teens and young adults.

Beth Stroble
Alex Heuer

In September 2014, Webster University began celebrating its centennial year of providing higher education in the St. Louis region and across the world.

Beth Stroble, president of Webster University, said the institution is continuing to expand its reach. In January 2016, classes will begin at the Arcade Building in downtown St. Louis as part of the Gateway Campus. Currently, the downtown campus accommodates 500 students, with 500 more expected to enroll by next year.

The Sheldon

The Cabaret Project of St. Louis will host its annual St. Louis Cabaret Festival from July 22-25 at the Sheldon Concert Hall and for one night at the Kranzberg Arts Center. The festival will feature three musical artists, including Tony-award winning singer Marilyn Maye, who will perform during the event’s opening night celebration.

Maye is scheduled to showcase her rendition of Frank Sinatra’s songs entitled “Sinatra – Her Way.” She has only performed the piece in a select few cities outside of New York.

Katie's Pizza
Sauce Magazine

Enjoying a beer, cocktail or glass of wine at the end of the workday – at a discounted price – is the epitome of a happy hour.

Our monthly Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine seeks to answer the question: Where are the best happy hours in the St. Louis area?

And, the magazine considered several “best of” happy hour categories including wine, beer, cocktails, day drinking, al fresco drinking, pitchers and ambiance.

The selection process was based on four qualities:

Courtesy of Dale Sweet

Beginning July 19, Cinema St. Louis will hold its annual St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase featuring works created by St. Louis artists and films with strong local ties.

The four-day event includes 88 films ranging from full-length fiction features to documentaries and multi-film compilations of fiction. Screenings for all films will take place at the Tivoli Theatre.

Rick Rosenfeld and Sam Dotson
Alex Heuer

This week’s shooting of a police officer in the Central West End underscores the fact that crime continues to be a big problem in the area.

As of July 14, St. Louis City’s homicide rate is on pace to exceed the number of homicides in 2014.

This photo of Ozark Air Lines DC-3 plane by the Arch was taken in the 1960s after the Arch was completed.
Courtesy: Ozark Silver Swallows

Ozark Air Lines began operating in 1950, with commercial flights between St. Louis and Chicago and enroute stops at Springfield, Decatur, and Champaign Illinois. But in 1986, Trans World Airlines (TWA) took over the airline, its routes and aircraft, leaving behind memories of the regional airline.

At 5p.m. on July 21, the Tivoli Theatre will screen “The Swallows’ Tale: The Story of Ozark Air Lines,” a short documentary about the St. Louis-based airline. The film will air as part of Cinema St. Louis Filmmaker’s Showcase.

St. Louis Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

After the push for increasing minimum wage in St. Louis resumed, two of the city’s top Democratic leaders

Aldermanic President Lewis Reed in a letter released to the media rejected the latest proposal on minimum wage, stating that it “falls way short of providing relief to working families” while at the same time “institutes new system of inequalities, disincentives for students, and loopholes.”

Esley Hamilton
Alex Heuer

After more than 40 years of working in the St. Louis region, Esley Hamilton is partially retiring from his post as a preservation historian.

Hamilton began his career in 1968 as an intern in East St. Louis. As years passed, he became a well-known preservation historian for Saint Louis County Parks and Recreation, working to save threatened historic property in the area.

Alex Heuer

During World War II, a St. Louis-based company took on a project that turned out to be detrimental to the health of its employees.

Mallinckrodt Chemical Company was responsible for refining massive amounts of uranium for the Manhattan Project. As a result, some of Mallinckrodt’s employees succumbed to various illnesses caused by exposure to nuclear waste.

Henry Biggs
Courtesy of Henry Biggs

Henry Biggs, an entrepreneur and former dean at Washington University in St. Louis, had a big goal in mind that involved a 27-mile swim for a good cause.

On July 15, Biggs swam around Manhattan to raise funds for educational and mentoring initiatives in Ferguson.

Goldie Taylor
Robert Ector Photography

As discussions about race relations continue across the nation, many people are working to bridge the gaps.

Goldie Taylor, former St. Louisan and senior editor for Blue Nation Review, joined “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh to talk about the issues and importance of social equality. Taylor is also a contributor for CNN and HLN, and a former contributor for MSNBC.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

On Friday, “Cityscape” host Steve Potter led a discussion about the life and career of jazz pianist Ray Kennedy who died on May 28 after a long battle with Multiple Sclerosis.

Born to a musical family in Maplewood, Kennedy began his career in St. Louis before moving to New York. He is perhaps best known as the pianist/arranger for the John Pizzarelli Trio.

Max & Louie Productions presents "The Killing of Sister George." Left, Shannon Nara; Right, Lavonne Byers
ProPhotoSTL.com

Max and Louie Productions will kick off its 5th season with the dark comedy “The Killing of Sister George.” Written by Frank Marcus, the play was named Best Play of the 1965-66 Season by The Theatre Critics Variety Poll.

“The Killing of Sister George” is viewed as a groundbreaking production. Highlighting a lesbian relationship, the initial 1965 production shocked audiences in Britain and it received an “X” rating because of its content.  

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