Gloria S. Ross

Gloria S. Ross is the head of Okara Communications and AfterWords, an obituary-writing and design service.

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Obituary
8:51 pm
Sun June 22, 2014

Morton R. Bearman: Leader Of Political Campaigns And Lawyer For The Environment

Morton Bearman
Credit Provided by the Family

Morton R. Bearman, who helped elect two generations of Symingtons to Congress and who became one of the St. Louis area’s first environmental attorneys, died Friday. He was 92.

Mr. Bearman was a staunch Democrat who was active in politics throughout his life. He served as campaign chair for both the late Stuart Symington, the former four-term U.S. senator from Missouri, and Symington’s son, James, who was elected four times to the U.S. House of Representatives.

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Faulkner Center
8:12 am
Thu June 19, 2014

Louis Daniel ‘L.D.’ Brodsky: He Would Not Let A Day Go By Without Writing A Poem

Louis Brodsky
Credit Provided by the family

Louis Daniel Brodsky, a stunningly prolific writer who composed nearly 12,000 poems, including more than 350 on the Holocaust, has died.

When Mr. Brodsky decided to become serious about his poetry, he committed himself to writing a poem every day of his life.

“He worked at being a poet,” said Eugene Redmond, professor emeritus of Southern Illinois University Edwardsville and poet laureate of East St. Louis. “Lou went to work like a physician, like a person who worked in a coal mine, like a janitor, like a math teacher. It was amazing.”

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Obituary
7:45 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Lou 'Fatha' Thimes Sr.: He Made A Living In Government; A Life In Radio

Lou 'Fatha' Thimes Sr.
Credit St. Louis Media Archive

In the dog-eat-dog world of music radio, Lou “Fatha” Thimes Sr. was top dog for a very long time.

“In broadcasting you’ve got to be able to contend with all types of personalities, your boss, the program director …” said the veteran disc jockey, leaving the sentence dangling in the 1999 book of biographies, Lift Every Voice and Sing. But, he added: “Broadcasting is a beautiful field. I’ve loved every moment of it.”

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Obituary
1:58 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

Sheila F. Lumpe: Former Missouri State Representative And Public Service Commission Chair

Sheila Lumpe
Credit Family Photo

Former Missouri State Rep. Sheila Lumpe, who reluctantly entered statewide politics and became the first woman to lead the powerful House Budget Committee and came within a whisper of being the first speaker of the House, died on Wednesday.

When her husband began cajoling her to run for the office, she balked, siding with detractors who thought her “too soft” and subject to being “eaten alive” by big-time politics.

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Obituary
7:12 am
Tue June 3, 2014

Linda Dubinsky Skrainka: An Artist Of Reflection And Reality

Linda Dubinsky Skrainka
Credit from her website

Linda Skrainka, whose brush strokes reflect everyday life and transform the banalities into large, exquisite tributes to architectural stasis, nature and ordinary moments in time, died yesterday morning.

Her oil paintings are imbued with minute details that human eyes often fail to register, making them a treasure of rediscovery. They are also, often, literal reflections as Mrs. Skrainka painted shadows and mirrored surfaces to create pictures within pictures.

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Obituary
10:28 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Eric James Nuetzel, M.D.: Psychiatrist With An Actor’s Heart

Eric Nuetzel
Credit Courtesy, St. Louis Psychoanalytic Institute

Eric Nuetzel, M.D., didn’t merely enjoy good stage and screen performances, he dissected them. He plumbed the depths of such Shakespearean classics as Othello and Macbeth, as well as timeless movies like It’s A Wonderful Life and Raging Bull, to find their meaning and relevance to the human condition.

Dr. Nuetzel, who eagerly shared his astute analyses with audiences and students, taught simultaneously in the Department of Psychiatry and the Performing Arts Department at Washington University.

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Obituary
11:12 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Joseph P. Teasdale: 'Walkin’ Joe' Teasdale, Missouri’s 48th Governor

Gov. Joseph Teasdale
Credit State Archives

When Joseph Teasdale ran for governor in the mid-70s, he walked a thousand miles en route to winning the tightest gubernatorial race in the nation, handing a popular incumbent governor a stunning defeat. His margin of victory over Missouri Republican Gov. Christopher S. “Kit” Bond, by whom he had been defeated in the previous election, was a mere 12,000 votes out of more than 1.9 million cast. Even members of the Teasdale campaign cabinet were stunned.

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Obituary
10:55 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Ralph W. Kalish, Jr.: Attorney, actor, playwright, restaurateur

Ralph Kalish
Credit / Photo provided by Kalish family

By day, Ralph Kalish was a well-respected, successful patent attorney. By night, he was, well, he was anything — anyone — he wanted to be: restaurateur, playwright, actor.

In 2011, he became Branch Rickey, the former, longtime St. Louis Cardinals Baseball manager who changed the game forever by bringing Jackie Robinson into the formerly all-white major leagues.

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Obituary
1:42 pm
Tue May 6, 2014

Ralph V. Streiff: Led Nooter Corporation

Ralph V. Streiff
Credit / Photo provided by Streiff family

Ralph V. Streiff, who was onboard at homegrown Nooter Corp. as the former boiler works company moved into building custom apparatus that helped stamp out polio and put men on the moon, died Sunday. He was 86.

Fresh out of Washington University School of Engineering in 1951, Mr. Streiff joined Nooter as a sales engineer. Forty years later, he retired as president and chairman of the company, which had become one of the largest metal fabricators in the world during his tenure.

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Obituary
11:16 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Rep. Rory Ellinger: Civil Rights Activist, Attorney Fought For ‘Vulnerable And Powerless'

Rory Ellinger. This photo was designed to be used for his re-election campaign. But that campaign was stopped when the Democratic state representative learned he had liver cancer.
Credit campaign photo

During the late 1950s, Rory Ellinger, a high school student at Bishop Du Bourg, had a job as a checker at Kroger’s. During a lunch break, he became transfixed by people picketing the nearby Woolworth’s over dining practices.

“Blacks could only order food to go out,” he recalled in the 1999 book, A Generation Divided. “If you were black, you came in and they served you in a bag and you had to leave.”

He joined the NAACP picket line. It was the prelude to a life defined by the civil rights movement.

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