Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Jason Rosenbaum

Political Reporter

Since entering the world of professional journalism in 2006, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in Richmond Heights with with his wife Lauren Todd, an engineering librarian at Washington University. They have two sons, Brandon Todd Rosenbaum and Declan Todd Rosenbaum.

Gubernatorial candidate Eric Greitens looks at his ballot before sitting down to vote at the St. Louis Public Library in the Central West End on Tuesday.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Cole County Prosecutor Mark Richardson announced he will not charge Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens for filing false campaign finance reports.

It’s a situation that stems back to April 2017, when Greitens signed a consent order with the Missouri Ethics Commission about a matter that may become a major rationale for his potential impeachment.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens speaks Thursday in Jefferson City to a group of mostly farmers and students about what he called "rip-off" artists who were out to get him.May 17, 2018
Jo Mannies | St. Louis Public Radio

Standing in a light rain in the shadow of the state Capitol, Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens blamed “rip-off artists” in the state’s low-income housing program “who thought they ran Missouri” for many of his legal troubles and the threat of his impeachment.

But recalling his past as a Navy SEAL, Greitens declared Thursday that they won’t succeed because he was taught to never quit.

Governor Eric Greitens speaks to reporters outside the Civil Courts Building in downtown St. Louis after his felony invasion of privacy charge was dropped. May 14, 2018
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

In a saga that’s featured twists, turns, drama and intrigue, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner’s decision to drop a felony invasion of privacy charge was genuinely surprising.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens walks out of the Civil Courts Building in downtown St. Louis after his felony invasion of privacy charge was dropped. May14, 2018
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

In a stunning move, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner has dropped the felony invasion of privacy charge against Gov. Eric Greitens — short-circuiting the unprecedented trial of a sitting Missouri chief executive.

While Gardner’s office is promising to refile the case with a special prosecutor, the governor’s attorneys are confident that another prosecutor won’t touch the case.

State Rep. Peter Merideth, D-St. Louis
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome state Rep. Peter Merideth to the program.

Merideth is a St. Louis Democrat who represents south-central portions of the city in the Missouri House. He was elected to his seat in 2016 and is running for re-election later this year.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov 16, 2011 - Gov. Jay Nixon jumped into a controversial fight over St. Louis County parks, noting Wednesday that his administration is working with St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley.

Dooley has been under fire for a plan to close roughly 23 parks and lay off 133 employees. Opposition to the plan is fierce, as seen with a standing-room only budget meeting last night in the St. Louis County Council chambers.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 16, 2011 - An overflowing crowd packed the St. Louis County Council's chambers, and poured into the hall, to unleash a torrent of criticism Tuesday against St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley's proposal to make steep cuts in the county's park system.

St. Louis Circuit Court Judge Rex Burlison speaks with a reporter as St. Louis Sheriff Vernon Betts escorts him into the courthouse on May 10, 2018.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Rachel Lippmann, Marshall Griffin and Jo Mannies break down all of the developments this week in Gov. Eric Greitens’ political and legal saga.

This week’s episode gives a preview of the governor’s felony invasion of privacy trial, which is slated to get started next week. We also get an update on whether legislators will impeach the governor — and the status of Greitens’ second felony charge for computer data tampering.

Michelle Nasser and Scott Rosenblum, members of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens' defense team, arrive at the St. Louis Civil Courts building Thursday morning for the first day of jury selection in Greitens' felony invasion of privacy trial. 051018
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 8:00 p.m. May 10 with more information from the first day — Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens was in a St. Louis courtroom Thursday watching jury selection for his upcoming invasion of privacy trial slowly unfold.

Wearing a business suit and a purple tie, Greitens spent most of the day quietly conferring with his attorneys. He’s accused of taking a photograph of a woman with whom he had an affair without her consent — and placing it in a position to be accessed by a computer.

Political consultant and lobbyist Mike Hafner
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Within days after Mike Hafner began work in January 2015 as a full-time campaign staffer for Republican Eric Greitens, Hafner says he was presented with a copy of the donor list for The Mission Continues, the charity that Greitens helped found.

“We had set a meeting to discuss the donor list, so I could get notes from Eric and build a fundraising plan for his potential candidacy,” Hafner said in an interview Wednesday.

Rep. Shamed Dogan, R-Ballwin
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome state Rep. Shamed Dogan to the program.

Dogan is a Republican from Ballwin. He was first elected to the Missouri House in 2014 and was re-elected in 2016. He decided to run for another House term in 2018 after mulling over whether to run for St. Louis County executive.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens helped engineer a freeze on low-income housing tax credits. And that decision is likely to stand unless the legislature makes substantial changes to the program.
File photo I Carolina Hidaglo | St. Louis Public Radio

A St. Louis judge overseeing Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ felony invasion of privacy trial has declined to prevent his accuser from testifying.

That decision Monday was part of a slew of rulings that could end up shaping Greitens’ trial. He’s accused of taking a semi-nude photo of a woman he with whom he had an affair without her consent — and placing it in a position where it could be electronically transmitted. And it also came as St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner’s office conceded again they did not have the photo in their possession.

An email sent to St. Louis Public Radio about a now-scuttled soccer stadium prompted Attorney General Josh Hawley to once again look into Gov. Eric Greitens’ social media policies. Jan. 2017
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

It’s not every day that a sentence in a 14-month-old article is the catalyst behind an attorney general inquiry into a sitting governor.

But that’s exactly what’s happened in April, when an email sent to St. Louis Public Radio about a now-scuttled soccer stadium prompted Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley to look again into Gov. Eric Greitens’ social media policies.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens speaks with reporters after touring Our Lady's Inn, a St. Louis pregnancy center for women experiencing homelessness, on June 8, 2017.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Jo Mannies and Rachel Lippmann examine what turned out to be a very busy week in the legal and political saga of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

This week’s edition of the podcast zeroes in on a historic special session to possibly consider impeachment — and a second House committee report regarding the acquisition of a fundraising list from the Mission Continues.

Tim Bommel | Missouri House Communications

Gov. Eric Greitens is in danger of becoming the first Missouri governor ever to be impeached.

That’s because members of the House and Senate have gathered enough signatures to call a special session that would include considering impeaching the GOP governor, who is facing two felony charges and a full collapse of his political support.

Councilwoman Hazel Erby, D-University City
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome back Councilwoman Hazel Erby to the program.

The University City Democrat represents the council’s 1st District, which takes in a number of municipalities in central and north St. Louis County. Erby represents most of Ferguson, and she was a key figure in the aftermath of the shooting death Michael Brown in that city in 2014.

Mark Sableman, an attorney for KMOV, talks to reporters after a judge barred cameras in the courtroom during Gov. Eric Greitens' trial. (May 3, 2018)
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

The judge handling Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ felony invasion of privacy trial has denied a bid to have the proceedings televised.

But St. Louis Circuit Judge Rex Burlison said Thursday he is considering allowing audio recorders and still photography in his courtroom.

Democrats hope that Gov. Eric Greitens will be an albatross for GOP state legislative candidates.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

A report from a House committee investigating Gov. Eric Greitens’ conduct contends that the governor signed a false account to state ethics officials about how he obtained a fundraising list from a veterans charity.

The report, released Wednesday, also states Greitens received the fundraising list much earlier than what was in a Missouri Ethics Commission consent order that he signed in April 2017.

A child looks at one of two grizzly bear cubs at the St. Louis Zoo in September 2017.
File photo I David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Members of the St. Louis County Council are placing an one-eighth of one cent sales tax on the November ballot to benefit the St. Louis Zoo.

While proponents of the measure believe it could enliven a part of the county that’s struggled economically, others believe it places too much of a burden on residents already shelling out property taxes to fund the zoo.

Attorney Al Watkins walks out Tuesday of the Carnahan Courthouse in St. Louis. He's joined by Chuck Hatfield, a Jefferson City attorney who represented him during his two-day deposition.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Gov. Eric Greitens’ attorneys finished questioning the attorney for a witness in the governor’s felony invasion of privacy case on Tuesday, but attorneys for both sides didn’t reveal who supplied $100,000 in cash for Al Watkins’ representation.

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