Jason Rosenbaum

Political Reporter

Since entering the enticing world of professional journalism in the mid-2000s, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and in the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in St. Louis City with with his wife Lauren Todd, an engineering librarian at Washington University. Their son, Brandon Todd Rosenbaum, was born in February 2014.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

This week’s split show features insight from the Politically Speaking crew and a visit from a political figure from the western side of the state – state Sen. Paul LeVota.

Note: You can subscribe to us on iTunes now.

The first part of the show breaks down the latest developments in the state budgetary process and the advancement of a sales tax increase to fund transportation projects. Capitol reporter Marshall Griffin fills in for the vacationing Jo Mannies.

Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis County Councilwoman Kathleen Kelly Burkett has died at the age of 68. 

Burkett, D-Overland, was diagnosed with cancer last year while serving as chairwoman of the St. Louis County Council. She continued to serve as a councilwoman while undergoing chemotherapy, but she had been absent from meetings the past few weeks.

In a statement Sunday, St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley praised Burkett as someone who “took care of her constituents like they were her own family.”

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio's Chris McDaniel, Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum talk about the week’s politics. Jo is on vacation this week, so Capitol reporter Marshall Griffin joins us from Jefferson City for the show.

Note: You can subscribe to us on iTunes now.

On the show, we discuss whether or not the 2014 elections are a bust, get into Medicaid expansion in Missouri, and explain what's going on with this year's nullification bill.

On the show:

(Missouri Solar Energy Industry Association)

(Updated at 10:25 p.m. on Thursday)

A report from the NAACP says Missouri should increase production of renewable power and require utilities to offer energy efficiency programs. 

Accomplishing those goals, the report says, could provide better health, cheaper utility bills and more manufacturing jobs in the state’s urban core.

File photo

The long-running saga to fill the St. Louis County Board of Police Commissioners ended Tuesday when the St. Louis County Council approved Laurie Westfall’s nomination to the board that oversees the St. Louis County Police Department. She is the widow of former St. Louis County Executive Buzz Westfall. 

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio

State Treasurer Clint Zweifel issued a report aiming to shore up the state’s military installations and contractors.

The report comes several months after Gov. Jay Nixon appointed Zweifel to head the Missouri Military Partnership, an initiative to bolster defense installations throughout the state. Missouri is home to several major military bases, including Whiteman Air Force Base in western Missouri and Fort Leonard Wood in mid-Missouri.

Courtesy of Jay Ashcroft

While Jay Ashcroft, the son of former U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft, was always interested in politics, he also said he didn’t consider it “the highest calling.”

“My highest calling in life is to be a good husband to my wife and to be a good father for my kids," said the attorney and engineer from unincorporated St. Louis County. “In the last couple of years when I’ve seen how government has been working at the state level and unfortunately not always working, I kept coming around to the conclusion that I need to be part of the solution.”

(Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio)

When St. Louis Judge Robert Dierker issued a preliminary injunction against the Take Back St. Louis initiative, it knocked the measure off of the city of St. Louis’ April municipal elections ballot.

But that doesn’t mean the fight is over. Both sides are heading back to court on Monday to potentially decide the future of the ballot initiative.

St. Louis County Executive-elect Steve Stenger talks to St. Louis Public Radio reporters Nov. 5, 2014, during a recording of the 'Politically Speaking' podcast.
Chris McDaniel / St. Louis Public Radio

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio's Chris McDaniel, Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum talk about the week’s politics. On this show, our guest is St. Louis County Councilman Steve Stenger, a Democrat from Affton who is challenging County Executive Charlie Dooley in this summer’s primary.

Note: You can subscribe to us on iTunes now.

During his appearance, Stenger:

Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

(Updated at 4:15 p.m. on Thursday)

A pro-transit organization released a study today that could lead to a new MetroLink station in St. Louis’ central corridor. 

A study by Citizens for Modern Transit examined the costs and viability of building a MetroLink station between Sarah and Boyle in Midtown. The station would be located close to CORTEX, a fast-growing bioscience and technology hub. And it would also be close to where furniture retailer Ikea is expected to set up shop in 2015.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

For all intents and purposes, the 2014 election season looks to be a great, big bust.

Nobody should be surprised, as 2014 was always a way station to 2016. But hardly anybody expected that the only statewide race on the ballot would feature state Auditor Tom Schweich facing off against a Libertarian or Constitution Party candidate -- but not even a token Democrat. And some previously heated state Senate contests completely fizzled out.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

(Updated 4 p.m., Tues., March 25)

State Auditor Tom Schweich issued a tough audit of the Missouri’s historic preservation tax credit, saying that the incentive that’s refurbished countless buildings throughout the state is too expensive and structurally inefficient. 

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio's Chris McDaniel, Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum talk about the week’s politics.  

Note: You can subscribe to us on iTunes now.

This week the Politically Speaking crew (minus Chris McDaniel) welcomes U.S. Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer to the show. The St. Elizabeth Republican’s sprawling district extends into St. Charles, Franklin, Lincoln and Jefferson counties, as well as mid-Missouri outposts, such as Jefferson City and the Lake of the Ozarks.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin has been supportive of how the U.S. froze bank accounts and barred visas of Russian officials over that country’s action in Ukraine.  

But the Illinois Democrat wants to send a stronger message to Russia by taking initial steps to admit the Republic of Georgia into NATO.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

With big defense cuts on the horizon, Illinois’ federal and state leaders are putting up a united front to protect Scott Air Force Base. 

Both U.S. Sens. Dick Durbin and Mark Kirk were part of a federal and state delegation meeting with U.S. Air Force Chief of Staff Mark Welsh. Their meeting at Scott Air Force Base comes as Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel asked Congress to re-start a base closing commission – or BRAC.

Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Ray Friem of Metro has a simple message to riders of its Grand Line: “The big buses have arrived.” 

Metro showed off its refurbished, 60-foot, articulated buses on Friday. The buses represent the transit service’s response to overcrowding on the #70 Grand Line. Metro’s busiest route is often so crowded that riders have to stand – or can't even get on.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Chris Sommers is putting his money where his mouth is when it comes to the minimum wage. 

Sommers is the owner of six Pi Pizzerias restaurants and Gringo in the Central West End. Instead of waiting for Congress or the Missouri General Assembly to act, he’s heeding President Barack Obama’s call for business owners to voluntarily raise the minimum wage his employees.

Starting on April 1, everybody who works at one of Sommers’ restaurants will make at least $10.10 an hour. It’s a move Sommers said will help entry-level workers make a decent living.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio's Chris McDaniel, Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum talk about the week’s politics.  

Note: You can subscribe to us on iTunes now.

We know you can’t get enough of Politically Speaking, which is why we have two episodes this week. The Politically Speaking crew's latest interview features St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley, a Democrat who has held the powerful local office since late 2003.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Raising the minimum wage would be a big help for people like Shnette Hooker, an employee at a McDonald’s in Spanish Lake. Hooker said, it would allow people “to save a little money,” “take care of their kids” and “get off the assistance that everybody is on.” 

But more than just that, Hooker said boosting the minimum wage is a matter of fairness.

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio's Chris McDaniel, Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum talk about the week’s politics. 

We’ve broken another barrier on the show: U.S. Rep. John Shimkus is the first political figure from Illinois to be a guest on the podcast. The Collinsville Republican has represented large areas of southern Illinois since 1997 and plays a major role on the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.