Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Jason Rosenbaum

Political Reporter

Since entering the enticing world of professional journalism in the mid-2000s, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and in the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in St. Louis City with with his wife Lauren Todd, an engineering librarian at Washington University. Their son, Brandon Todd Rosenbaum, was born in February 2014.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: A Board of Aldermen bill limiting campaign contributions for St. Louis offices received praise – and attracted tough questions – during Monday's committee hearing.

While the bill's chief sponsor said that he plans to tweak the bill’s language, he added that he would keep pushing the measure through the process.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Casting their Republican counterparts as ineffectual extremists, some of Missouri’s top Democratic officials provided a blueprint of sorts at the Jefferson-Jackson Dinner to gain even more ground in the Show Me State.

And Attorney General Chris Koster, a former Republican, pledged to put up a substantial amount of campaign money to help the cause.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When this session of the Missouri General Assembly came to a close in May, Democratic lawmakers and their allies wasted little time in criticizing the GOP majority for passing "extreme" bills.

Take, for example, House Minority Leader Jake Hummel. The St. Louis Democrat sent out a statement lambasting the Republican majority’s “super-extremist” agenda, including measures nullifying federal guns laws, barring implementation of a United Nations resolution called Agenda 21 and banning drones.

Speaker Pro Tem Jason Smith, R-Salem, speaks with fellow Republican legislators on the final day of the General Assembly's 2013 session. Smith - the GOP nominee in the 8th Congressional District - received a standing ovation then, including from Democrats
Tim Bommel | Missouri House Communications

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In some respects, the preliminary jockeying to replace U.S. Rep. Jo Ann Emerson may have been more exciting than the actual election.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon has upped the ante in his criticism of a broad-based tax cut bill awaiting his decision, saying Thursday that it removes a sales tax exemption for prescription drugs that will raise taxes for millions of Missourians.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay is taking a wait-and-see approach on a recently introduced bill to cap campaign contributions for city offices.

But Slay said he supports “reasonable” contribution limits, which he noted were in place for years before the Missouri General Assembly removed them in 2008.

Scott Ogilvie
Provided by Mr. Ogilvie | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: If there’s one message that Alderman Scott Ogilvie wants to deliver with his bill restricting campaign contributions to city of St. Louis candidates, it’s that Missouri’s situation is not the norm.

From a practical standpoint, Ogilvie is correct. Missouri is one of only four states without contribution limits, a distinction that’s spurred much discussion  -- and, in some cases, derision – over the past few years.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development told St. Louis that it had to change the way community block grants were divided, most policymakers were generally enthusiastic about the change.

For years, block grants were divided up wards, giving aldermen more power and influence on where to direct the money. Now, St. Louis is moving toward a more centralized process, where organizations and agencies that want funding will have to apply and make a case for the money.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Most children of the Midwest don’t get to experience soaring mountains. So, often, they have to make do with skyscrapers.

Chicago suburbanites like myself often encountered blasé surroundings growing up, with enough shopping centers and chain restaurants to create a sense of monotony. Going to downtown Chicago became something of an event, even if the only activities were taking pictures of the architecture or eating an opulent stuffed pizza.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon - St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley gave his full support last week to using Sylvan Springs Park to expand Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

But not everybody is excited about the idea.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon - The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is pressing the city of St. Louis to change how it divvies up Community Development Block Grant funds.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Since the Missouri General Assembly adjourned on Friday, Gov. Jay Nixon hasn’t made much headway on the tall stack of bills awaiting his consideration.

Gov. Jay Nixon talks to reporters after RGA's groundbreaking ceremony in Chesterfield.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When the Missouri House convened Thursday, legislators looked up to see a spooky sight: a life-size human “body” lying atop the chamber’s huge skylight.

The “body” turned out to be a paper cutout placed on the roof as a joke.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri General Assembly has ended. The legislature has approved some consequential bills -- and left others unattended. As we count down to the end of the session on Friday, this list will be updated to reflect legislation that’s passed -- or passed on.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Hours before adjournment for the year, a state Senate filibuster appears to have killed a tax credit package that had won approval from the House just a couple hours earlier.

The package had been assembled by House and Senate conferees late Thursday and approved by leaders in both chambers.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Now in his third year in the Missouri Senate, state Sen. John Lamping hasn’t had much of a reputation for filibustering.

But that changed Tuesday when the Ladue Republican took a leading role in filibustering a one-cent sales tax increase for transportation. His opposition played a big role in derailing – at least for the time being – a measure sponsored by State Sen. Mike Kehoe and supported by a wide range of interest groups.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Two Democratic U.S. senators condemned the Internal Revenue Service's targeting of conservative groups for stricter review as "un-American" and "absolutely unacceptable."

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill added that high-ranking IRS officials should be fired if they knew what was happening.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley gave his "100 percent" support to giving Sylvan Springs Park to the federal government to expand Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The effort in the Missouri legislature to abolish local foreclosure mediation ordinances, such as those in St. Louis and St. Louis County, had all the right kind of legislative momentum.

State Rep. Stanley Cox and House Majority John Diehl's legislation had unchallenged support from Republican legislators. It was a major priority for the state's banking and real estate industry, two powerful and influential interest groups that opposed the ordinances in St. Louis County and St. Louis. And some Democratic legislators in the Missouri House supported it.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon indicated Friday that he had serious misgivings about a broad-based tax cut bill that the Missouri General Assembly has sent to his desk.

But Nixon, a Democrat, stopped short of saying whether he would sign or veto the measure, which was crafted to compete with neighboring states, such as Kansas, that have aggressively cut taxes.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri lawmakers finished work on the bills that encompass the state's budget, sending the 2014 fiscal year plan to Gov. Jay Nixon a day before a mandated deadline.

But the bills passed by the legislature include several provisions that have raised the governor's ire, including partial funding of the Department of Revenue's Division of Motor Vehicles.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri House approved wide-reaching legislation cutting personal income, corporate and business taxes, sending the measure to Gov. Jay Nixon for consideration.

The House passed state Sen. Eric Schmitt's legislation, SB 253, Thursday by a vote of 103-51. That vote came a day after the Missouri Senate passed the bill by a vote of 24-9 and sent it to the House. Now Nixon will have to consider whether to sign or veto the bill.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon announced Wednesday that he would reduce staff and services at the Division of Motor Vehicles if the General Assembly passes a budget funding two-thirds of its fiscal year budget.

But the chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee said such a move is unnecessary -- and added that the legislature needs to pursue its plan to  force the agency to change how it issues driver's licenses.

Brent Jones | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Cherokee Street developed a reputation in recent years as a creative and cultural hotspot, buoyed by a diverse and eclectic mix of businesses.

But while many are optimistic about the business district's future, some feel it needs to be more responsive to residents in surrounding neighborhoods.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri Senate sent legislation to Gov. Jay Nixon aimed at abolishing the foreclosure mediation ordinances in St. Louis County and St. Louis, constituting a major blow to the programs.

State Rep. Stanley Cox, R-Sedalia, and House Majority Leader John Diehl, R-Town and Country, sponsored legislation to “pre-empt” foreclosure mediation programs in counties or cities.

Brent Jones | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Nicole Cortes felt the "pull" of Cherokee Street when she was looking for a home.

Cortes, an immigration attorney with the Migrant and Immigrant Community Action Project, said she was attracted to "the diversity and the eclectic mix of small businesses" in the south St. Louis commercial hub. She was also heartened by the area's affordable property — and demographic diversity.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: During the waning days of April, reports surfaced that a defeated Missouri Republican was seriously considering an electoral comeback after time away from public life.

No, it wasn't former U.S. Rep. Todd Akin. It was Bob Onder, a former state representative from Lake St. Louis who fell short nearly five years ago in the hotly contested 9th congressional district Republican primary.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Tempers flared at a meeting of the Ellisville City Council after an attempt to overturn former Mayor Adam Paul’s removal from office was stifled.

And supporters of the former mayor expressed blistering criticism about the growing costs to the city to defend the mayor's removal from office.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: State Sen. John Lamping is no stranger to challenging conventional wisdom about Missouri politics.

Since he entered the Missouri Senate in 2011, the Ladue Republican has introduced bills to shorten the legislative session, have the governor and lieutenant governor run as a ticket and curtail political contributions from tax credit recipients.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The sponsor of vetoed legislation allowing some counties and municipalities to collect sales tax on certain vehicle purchases says he will not attempt to persuade the General Assembly to override Gov. Jay Nixon’s objection.

Instead, state Sen. Mike Kehoe, R-Jefferson City, says he will work to pass an alternative to satisfy Nixon’s concerns. In his veto message last week, Nixon cited problems with the bill’s language.

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