Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Jason Rosenbaum

Political Reporter

Since entering the enticing world of professional journalism in the mid-2000s, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and in the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in St. Louis City with with his wife Lauren Todd, an engineering librarian at Washington University. Their son, Brandon Todd Rosenbaum, was born in February 2014.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: State Auditor Tom Schweich sharply criticized the Missouri House and Senate for its contention that records from individual lawmakers are not covered under the state’s open records laws.

Schweich, a Republican, released audits of the House and Senate on Friday. Among other things, the audits criticized both chambers for not properly retaining e-mail correspondence. The audits then went on to question the contention that records from individual lawmakers aren’t subject to the state’s Sunshine Law.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri Supreme Court affirmed that a program providing incentives to science and technology companies is unconstitutional.

In a unanimous decision, the court ruled that linking the Missouri Science and Innovation Reinvestment Act, or MOSIRA, to the tax credit bill -- known as SB 8 -- violated a constitutional prohibition against bills with multiple subjects.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: State Rep. Steve Hodges was a February surprise for southeast Missouri Democrats.

Before then, the East Prairie Democrat wasn’t considered a prospective candidate for the 8th congressional district seat. Soon after former U.S. Rep. Jo Ann Emerson, R-Cape Girardeau, announced her intention to resign to lead the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Hodges told reporters he wasn’t interested in the June 4 contest to succeed her in Congress. State Rep. Linda Black, D-Desloge, became the presumptive Democratic frontrunner.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Beau Willimon is a member of an exclusive caucus within the entertainment industry.

With the runaway success of his television show "House of Cards," the St. Louis County native is part of a bumper crop of entertainers who got their start at John Burroughs School in Ladue. Willimon joins Jon Hamm of "Mad Men" and Ellie Kemper of "The Office" as one of a creative troupe succeeding both in the limelight and behind the scenes.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Sharon Tyus didn’t know until Wednesday morning whether she would be going back to the St. Louis Board of Aldermen.

That’s because Tyus went to sleep before she knew the results in Tuesday’s Democratic primary, which she described as one of her “little quirks” she’s picked up during her political career.

When she woke up, Tyus discovered she had unseated Alderman Charles “Quincy” Troupe in the primary to represent the north St. Louis 1st Ward. Tyus racked up 47.73 percent of the vote, compared to Troupe’s 34.01 percent and Yolanda Brown’s 18.26 percent. 

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: With his victory over St. Louis Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed and former Alderman Jimmie Matthews, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay is likely to make history by becoming the first chief executive to win four four-year terms.

While other three-term mayors tried and failed to reach that milestone, Slay managed to achieve it with a 10-point victory in Tuesday's Democratic primary. He is heavily favored against Green Party nominee James McNeely in April's general election.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: A circuit judge slapped a temporary restraining order on St. Louis’ foreclosure mediation ordinance, effectively freezing the recently signed law for the time being.

On Tuesday, St. Louis Circuit Judge Robert Dierker ordered a 20-day hold on the ordinance, which St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay signed into law in late February. Dierker’s order barred the city “from enforcing the provisions of [the ordinance] provided that nothing herein shall be construed to prohibit voluntary participation in the program.” The Missouri Bankers Association and the Central Bank of Kansas City had sued to strike down the measure.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When the Board of Aldermen reconvenes later this year, the people who comprise the 28-member body will look awfully familiar.

That’s because St. Louis residents in 13 out of 15 wards voted to give incumbent city lawmakers another four years in office. That outcome wasn’t completely unexpected: Only seven wards had contested Democratic primaries, which in most cases are the decisive electoral contests. While several wards feature Republican or Green Party candidates, winning the Democratic primary in most instances is tantamount to election.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: With polls opening in less than 24 hours, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay and his chief rival – Aldermanic President Lewis Reed – are primarily focusing on one thing: getting their allied voters to show up.

“We’re preparing for ‘game day,’” said Reed campaign manager Glenn Burleigh.

After a weekend when both blitzed the city by showing up anywhere there was a crowd, Slay and Reed were spending their last campaign day zeroing on key voting blocs who can help each man the most.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: By Wednesday morning, St. Louis residents will have a pretty good idea of who the city's new mayor will be.

That’s because on Tuesday, city residents will vote in the Democratic primary for St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, St. Louis Aldermanic President President Lewis Reed or former Alderman Jimmie Matthews.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: An email campaign against state Sens. Paul LeVota, D-Independence, and Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis, may have resulted in unintended consequences.

The Missouri chapter of Americans for Prosperity, a conservative organization, targeted LeVota and Nasheed for slowing down state Sen. Dan Brown’s bill to stop public sector unions from automatically deducting dues.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis’ battle for mayor isn’t the only key contest on the March 5 Democratic primary ballot. City voters in 14 odd-numbered wards -- and in the 6th Ward -- will also choose their aldermen for the next four years.

Because St. Louis is overwhelmingly Democratic, many of those wards have no candidates from any other party. So the March 5 victors will have a strong edge -- or, in many cases, a lock -- in the April 2 general election.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Show Me State political obsessives, take note: It’s no longer necessary to be glued to a computer when legislative debate is afoot.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - A St. Louis County judge issued a temporary restraining order against St. Louis County's foreclosure mediation program, effectively freezing the implementation of the initiative signed into law earlier this month.

St. Louis County Councilwoman Hazel Erby, D-University City, wants to raise the county's minimum wage to $15 an hour.
File photo by Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - The St. Louis County Council gave initial approval to an ordinance setting up a foreclosure mediation process, an issue that drew passionate testimony from advocates of distressed homeowners and criticism from those who question the proposal's legality.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In remarks that have since gone viral, retired businessman Rex Sinquefield referenced a column in a central Missouri newspaper that seemed to suggest that the Ku Klux Klan created public education to harm black children.

But the author of that column said the piece was meant to be satire and dark humor to make a broader point about the need for school vouchers and was not meant to be taken literally.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Wealthy financier Rex Sinquefield is personally seeking to make the case that eliminating Missouri's income tax, and replacing it with a sales tax, would be an economic boon for the Show Me State.

But Sinquefield, who is bankrolling an initiative-petition drive on the subject, acknowledged Thursday that getting Missourians to go along with such a drastic change in their state's taxation system may take several years and perhaps several elections.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Sen. Jason Crowell may not be a household name to most Missourians.

But the Republican from Cape Girardeau is getting a lot of credit -- and blame -- for what passed and what didn't make it through the Missouri General Assembly's meandering seven-week special session, which ended today.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When the Department of Homeland Security released a list in May of cities that qualified for the Urban Area Security Initiative program, Kansas City didn't make the cut -- even though it's been receiving funds since 2003.

This year, St. Louis was the only city in Missouri to receive part of the $662.6 million allocated toward preventing or responding to terrorism, and it will likely receive a smaller slice -- about $5.97 million -- than in the 2010 budget year.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: For Mike Eads, a federal grant program to help local fire departments forestall layoffs provided some extra firepower in a crisis situation.

Eads is the fire chief at the Neosho Fire Department in southwest Missouri. In February, it received $780,643 from a Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response grant. SAFER is one of many grant programs under the Federal Emergency Management Agency's grant programs directorate -- part of the Department of Homeland Security -- that provides funds to local agencies.

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