Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Jason Rosenbaum

Political Reporter

Since entering the enticing world of professional journalism in the mid-2000s, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and in the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in St. Louis City with with his wife Lauren Todd, an engineering librarian at Washington University. Their son, Brandon Todd Rosenbaum, was born in February 2014.

300 pixels Department of Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx and Department of Interior Secretary Sally Jewell took part in Friday's ceremony.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

With two Cabinet secretaries in tow, regional leaders took their ceremonial shovels and broke ground to celebrate the beginning of roadwork construction, the first step in redoing the Gateway Arch's grounds.

Federal, state and local officials – including Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and Transpiration Secretary Anthony Foxx – were on hand Friday downtown to kick off road construction for the $380 million CityArchRiver project. The initiative is aimed at sprucing up the Arch grounds in time for the monument's 50th anniversary on Oct. 28, 2015.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: With two Cabinet secretaries in tow, regional leaders took their ceremonial shovels and broke ground to celebrate the beginning of roadwork construction, the first step in redoing the Gateway Arch's grounds.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When state Sen. Brad Lager spoke on the last day of this year's Missouri General Assembly session, he grabbed attention for calling members of the Missouri House “corrupt.”

Carter Carburetor was a major manufacturing plant from 1915 to 1984. Officials announced that the facility undergo a $30 million environmental cleanup.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Federal and local officials marked a milestone today in cleaning up the Carter Carburetor Superfund site in north St. Louis. The polluted and abandoned manufacturing facility has sat dormant for several decades.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley made a point earlier this summer to note that his friendship with St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay went beyond politics.

“[People will say] Charlie, Mayor Slay is your political friend. No he’s not,” Dooley said during a speech in June. “He is just my friend. He’s my friend. And that’s what I want you to understand. This is in our best interest. He wants St. Louis City to be successful. I want St. Louis County to be successful.

"Together, we want to the St. Louis region to be all that it can be,” he added.

Tommy Sowers, assistant secretary for public and intergovernmental affairs, speaks at St. Louis City Hall. The Rolla native was here for several events, including a ceremony  honoring businesses that hire veterans.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Army veteran Tommy Sowers, a Rolla native, spent some time in the media spotlight when he was the Democratic nominee running against U.S. Rep. Jo Ann Emerson, R-Cape Girardeau, in the 8th congressional district in 2010.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: During any given session of the Missouri General Assembly, hundreds of proposals fall by the wayside. But state Sen. Joe Keaveny was especially dismayed by the demise of a one-cent sales tax increase for transportation.

The St. Louis Democrat even went so far to call the defeat of state Sen. Mike Kehoe’s constitutional amendment “tragic.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Protesters returned Saturday to protest George Zimmerman's not guilty verdict in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin – and to call for a curtailment of violence throughout the region.

The above map shows the general location of the build in the Environmental Impact Study. St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley emphasized that there is no particular route. There is no design route. It’s just corridor.
Brent Jones | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The so-called South County Connector is years – if not decades – away from being built. It doesn't have funding and is for all intents and purposes simply an idea -- not a done deal.

But that isn’t stopping a broad coalition from speaking out – loudly – against the proposal, which aims to ease longstanding connectivity problems between northern and southern St. Louis County.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The case of George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin sparked intense discussion about race, profiling and the use of guns. 

But beyond those all those issues, Richard Rosenfeld sees the case as many do: the type of situation that shouldn’t have occurred and could have been avoided.

"I think it’s an absolutely tragedy, frankly," Rosenfeld said.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: As expected, the St. Louis County Planning Commission won’t make a recommendation on the future of a low-income senior facility in Oakville.

The announcement came before hundreds of people from the south St. Louis County community showed up in Clayton to speak out against the facility, which is under construction.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon used his veto pen more than ever this year. But he wants legislators to know he didn't do it to hurt their feelings.

Gov. Jay Nixon responds to a question about his pace of vetoing legislation at a bill signing in St. Louis.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri state Auditor Tom Schweich so far has amassed $293,825 in the bank for his expected 2014 re-election bid, thanks in part to a $100,000 donation from prominent St. Louis businessman Sam Fox.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Excluding line item budget vetoes, Gov. Jay Nixon vetoed 29 bills this session – more than his previous five years in office. Below are brief description of the bills – as well as a link to Nixon’s veto letters.

Hundreds of people gathered near the St. Louis Justice Center on Sunday to decry the verdict in the Trayvon Martin case. George Zimmerman was found not guilty on Saturday night of second-degree murder and manslaughter in the death of Martin.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Tamika Brison had a gut feeling that she wouldn’t be happy with the trial of George Zimmerman, the man who touched off a nationwide controversy when he was put on trial for the death of Trayvon Martin.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon let legislation wiping out foreclosure mediation ordinances in St. Louis and St. Louis County go into effect without his signature. It’s a move that effectively nullifies a major priority of housing advocacy organizations – and the region’s two top political leaders.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri Chamber of Commerce plans to take the airwaves next week in support of overriding Gov. Jay Nixon’s veto of tax cut legislation.

The Missouri Chamber of Commerce plans to start running this ad on Monday.

300 pixels Northside regeneration project
Beacon archives | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis' Tax Increment Financing Commission approved a public hearing for  the controversial Northside Regeneration plan, a move that could kick the stalled project back into high gear in the coming months.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: With the clock ticking on his time to sign or veto bills, Gov. Jay Nixon signed legislation revamping the Second Injury Fund and adding occupational disease to the workers compensation system.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon told reporters he was “hopeful” that House and Senate committees studying changes to the state’s Medicaid program would result in legislative action next year.

The two chambers are holding hearings this summer on the health-care program for the poor. The Senate committee held hearings in Jefferson City, while another House committee is set to convene tomorrow in Independence.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Former state Sen. Jason Crowell, a Cape Girardeau Republican, was -- and still is -- one of the sharpest critics of the state's historic preservation tax credit program. In 2011, he compared the program to when his parents gave him a credit card "only for emergencies."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon signed legislation on Monday to prohibit the use of electronic benefit cards at liquor stores, casinos or adult entertainment establishments.

The bill – sponsored by Sen. Will Kraus, R-Lee’s Summit, and co-sponsored by Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal, D-University City – bars an EBT card, a debit card accessing government benefits, from being used "in any place or for any item that is primarily marketed for or used by adults 18 or older" or "is not in the best interests of the child or household." That includes liquor stores, casinos and adult entertainment facilities.

John Lamping mo senator 2014
Official photo

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When it comes to lengthy commutes, state Sen. John Lamping’s may take the cake.

The Ladue Republican represents a swath of central and eastern St. Louis County in the Missouri Senate – a distinction he earned after a very narrow victory in 2010 over Democrat Barbara Fraser. But his family lives in Kansas City, mainly because his daughter is training to become an elite gymnast.

300 pixels only
Provided by Mr. Schlichter

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis attorney Jerry Schlichter recalls a time when the building that became the Renaissance Grand Hotel was a lot less grand. In the 1990s, he said, the building had broken windows and vegetation growing on the roof. It was common, he said, for people to light fires inside. Plans to renovate came and went over the years, with little success.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Last week’s spectacle in the Texas Senate got national attention, but some Missouri politicos may have experienced déjà vu while watching a livestream of Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis’ filibuster against an abortion bill.

That includes Senate Minority Leader Jolie Justus, a Kansas City Democrat who followed what she dubbed a "fascinating" situation.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: A St. Louis County judge permanently reinstated Ellisville Mayor Adam Paul, a move that could end the impeachment saga that has gripped the suburban town.

“This is the never-ending story and it’s finally coming to an end,” Paul said. “And it’s got a good ending, I think."

The Railway Exchange Building downtown
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay has a simple question to people trying to draw complicated conclusions from Macy’s impending departure from downtown St. Louis:

When was the last time you shopped there?

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon withheld nearly $400 million from the state’s 2014 budget, a move he attributed to uncertainty over a veto override of tax cut legislation.

Nixon, a Democrat, made the announcement in Jefferson City after signing bills on the state’s roughly $25 billion budget. In a statement, the governor said that he made the withholds because Republican lawmakers may try to override a tax cut bill – House Bill 253 – later this fall. Among other things, that bill cuts personal income, corporate and business taxes.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has struck down the Defense of Marriage Act, the big question is: What happens next?

For married couples in states that recognized same-sex marriage, the Supreme Court's decision means access to well over a thousand federal benefits. That includes, but isn’t limited to, filing joint income tax returns, receiving Social Security benefits and military spousal benefits.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In a major ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned on Wednesday the Defense of Marriage Act, declaring that legally married same-sex couples deserve the same federal benefits that go to all other married couples. The court's decision would allow same-sex married couples to file joint federal tax returns, obtain Social Security benefits and be exempted from estate taxes, among other things.

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