Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Jason Rosenbaum

Political Reporter

Since entering the world of professional journalism in 2006, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in St. Louis with with his wife Lauren Todd, an engineering librarian at Washington University. They have two sons, Brandon Todd Rosenbaum and Declan Todd Rosenbaum.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Excluding line item budget vetoes, Gov. Jay Nixon vetoed 29 bills this session – more than his previous five years in office. Below are brief description of the bills – as well as a link to Nixon’s veto letters.

Hundreds of people gathered near the St. Louis Justice Center on Sunday to decry the verdict in the Trayvon Martin case. George Zimmerman was found not guilty on Saturday night of second-degree murder and manslaughter in the death of Martin.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Tamika Brison had a gut feeling that she wouldn’t be happy with the trial of George Zimmerman, the man who touched off a nationwide controversy when he was put on trial for the death of Trayvon Martin.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon let legislation wiping out foreclosure mediation ordinances in St. Louis and St. Louis County go into effect without his signature. It’s a move that effectively nullifies a major priority of housing advocacy organizations – and the region’s two top political leaders.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri Chamber of Commerce plans to take the airwaves next week in support of overriding Gov. Jay Nixon’s veto of tax cut legislation.

The Missouri Chamber of Commerce plans to start running this ad on Monday.

300 pixels Northside regeneration project
Beacon archives | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis' Tax Increment Financing Commission approved a public hearing for  the controversial Northside Regeneration plan, a move that could kick the stalled project back into high gear in the coming months.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: With the clock ticking on his time to sign or veto bills, Gov. Jay Nixon signed legislation revamping the Second Injury Fund and adding occupational disease to the workers compensation system.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon told reporters he was “hopeful” that House and Senate committees studying changes to the state’s Medicaid program would result in legislative action next year.

The two chambers are holding hearings this summer on the health-care program for the poor. The Senate committee held hearings in Jefferson City, while another House committee is set to convene tomorrow in Independence.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Former state Sen. Jason Crowell, a Cape Girardeau Republican, was -- and still is -- one of the sharpest critics of the state's historic preservation tax credit program. In 2011, he compared the program to when his parents gave him a credit card "only for emergencies."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon signed legislation on Monday to prohibit the use of electronic benefit cards at liquor stores, casinos or adult entertainment establishments.

The bill – sponsored by Sen. Will Kraus, R-Lee’s Summit, and co-sponsored by Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal, D-University City – bars an EBT card, a debit card accessing government benefits, from being used "in any place or for any item that is primarily marketed for or used by adults 18 or older" or "is not in the best interests of the child or household." That includes liquor stores, casinos and adult entertainment facilities.

John Lamping mo senator 2014
Official photo

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When it comes to lengthy commutes, state Sen. John Lamping’s may take the cake.

The Ladue Republican represents a swath of central and eastern St. Louis County in the Missouri Senate – a distinction he earned after a very narrow victory in 2010 over Democrat Barbara Fraser. But his family lives in Kansas City, mainly because his daughter is training to become an elite gymnast.

300 pixels only
Provided by Mr. Schlichter

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis attorney Jerry Schlichter recalls a time when the building that became the Renaissance Grand Hotel was a lot less grand. In the 1990s, he said, the building had broken windows and vegetation growing on the roof. It was common, he said, for people to light fires inside. Plans to renovate came and went over the years, with little success.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Last week’s spectacle in the Texas Senate got national attention, but some Missouri politicos may have experienced déjà vu while watching a livestream of Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis’ filibuster against an abortion bill.

That includes Senate Minority Leader Jolie Justus, a Kansas City Democrat who followed what she dubbed a "fascinating" situation.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: A St. Louis County judge permanently reinstated Ellisville Mayor Adam Paul, a move that could end the impeachment saga that has gripped the suburban town.

“This is the never-ending story and it’s finally coming to an end,” Paul said. “And it’s got a good ending, I think."

The Railway Exchange Building downtown
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay has a simple question to people trying to draw complicated conclusions from Macy’s impending departure from downtown St. Louis:

When was the last time you shopped there?

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon withheld nearly $400 million from the state’s 2014 budget, a move he attributed to uncertainty over a veto override of tax cut legislation.

Nixon, a Democrat, made the announcement in Jefferson City after signing bills on the state’s roughly $25 billion budget. In a statement, the governor said that he made the withholds because Republican lawmakers may try to override a tax cut bill – House Bill 253 – later this fall. Among other things, that bill cuts personal income, corporate and business taxes.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has struck down the Defense of Marriage Act, the big question is: What happens next?

For married couples in states that recognized same-sex marriage, the Supreme Court's decision means access to well over a thousand federal benefits. That includes, but isn’t limited to, filing joint income tax returns, receiving Social Security benefits and military spousal benefits.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In a major ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned on Wednesday the Defense of Marriage Act, declaring that legally married same-sex couples deserve the same federal benefits that go to all other married couples. The court's decision would allow same-sex married couples to file joint federal tax returns, obtain Social Security benefits and be exempted from estate taxes, among other things.

Zack Boyers
Proivded by Mr. Boyers

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Zack Boyers remembers when somebody could organize an 11-on-11 soccer game on Washington Avenue’s streets – and not have to move out of the way.

In an interview with the Beacon on the second floor of the Fashion Square Lofts, Boyers – the CEO of U.S. Bancorp Community Development Corp. – said that “nothing was going on” in downtown residential development in 1997 when he arrived in St. Louis.

Downtown St. Louis,  looking east
File photo | Brent Jones | St. Louis Beacon

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: There’s little argument that downtown St. Louis has experienced a whirlwind of change in the past decade.

“If we want to compare downtown today to where it was 10 years ago, there’s no comparison,” said St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay. “It’s far beyond almost anybody’s expectations in terms of the development, the investment, the number of new residents and the vibrancy that we’re seeing downtown.”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin is once again wading into East St. Louis' local politics, sounding alarm over a proposal to create an entertainment district featuring all-night clubs. 

Durbin, D-Illinois, has clashed with East St. Louis Mayor Alvin Parks in the past couple of years over the closing times of clubs and liquor stores in the Metro East municipality.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The St. Louis County Council gave its final blessing to merging some duties of city and county economic development agencies, a move that ratifies a plan announced earlier this year.

Three local beer companies -- Schlafly, Four Hands and Civil Life Brewing Company -- provided drinks for Friday's fundraiser. Other local companies, neighborhood associations and ordinary residents also pitched in to help.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When Jason Deem met a tourist from Brooklyn on Thursday, he saw Anne McCullough – Cherokee Street’s liaison – apologize that a high-profile shooting was the man's first impression of the eclectic business district.

The tourist, he said, perhaps offered a farsighted take on the situation.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Business owners and residents of Cherokee Street are holding a rally and fundraiser tonight in the wake of yesterday’s murder-suicide at the Cherokee Street Place Business Incubator.

The Cherokee Street community is rallying behind the families of the murder victims. A fundraiser barbecue is being held tonight.

St. Louis County Economic Council President & CEO Denny Coleman and St. Louis Development Corp. executive director Rodney Crim smile before unveiling the regional entrepreneurial Initiative. Economic and political leaders are hoping to raise $100 million
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis’ business, civic and political leaders launched an ambitious effort to assist start-up companies in the region. And boosters are angling to raise $100 million for the initiative to help grow -- and retain -- emerging businesses in the region.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The St. Louis County Council passed a resolution on Tuesday to send an Oakville project for low-income seniors back to the county’s planning and zoning commission.

It was a move that pleased hundreds of residents of the south St. Louis County township that jammed Tuesday’s meeting.

There are plenty of short-hand adjectives I could use to describe Cherokee Street and its denizens: Hip. Artistic. Creative. Quirky. Young. Gruff.

And add passionate -- at least judging from the reaction to two Beacon stories about development along Cherokee and to an inquiry from the Public Insight Network (PIN).

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: A Board of Aldermen bill limiting campaign contributions for St. Louis offices received praise – and attracted tough questions – during Monday's committee hearing.

While the bill's chief sponsor said that he plans to tweak the bill’s language, he added that he would keep pushing the measure through the process.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Casting their Republican counterparts as ineffectual extremists, some of Missouri’s top Democratic officials provided a blueprint of sorts at the Jefferson-Jackson Dinner to gain even more ground in the Show Me State.

And Attorney General Chris Koster, a former Republican, pledged to put up a substantial amount of campaign money to help the cause.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When this session of the Missouri General Assembly came to a close in May, Democratic lawmakers and their allies wasted little time in criticizing the GOP majority for passing "extreme" bills.

Take, for example, House Minority Leader Jake Hummel. The St. Louis Democrat sent out a statement lambasting the Republican majority’s “super-extremist” agenda, including measures nullifying federal guns laws, barring implementation of a United Nations resolution called Agenda 21 and banning drones.

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