Jason Rosenbaum

Political Reporter

Since entering the enticing world of professional journalism in the mid-2000s, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and in the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in St. Louis City with with his wife Lauren Todd, an engineering librarian at Washington University. Their son, Brandon Todd Rosenbaum, was born in February 2014.

State Rep. Stacey Newman, D-Richmond Heights
Marshall Griffin I St. Louis Public Radio

The Politically Speaking podcast team of Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcomes state Rep. Stacey Newman, D-Richmond Heights, to this week's show.

Newman, whose 87th district includes some of the region’s most affluent suburbs, discusses at length her ongoing role in two of the state’s most controversial topics:  gun rights and photo IDs at the polls.

Newman’s district includes all of Clayton and parts of Ladue, Richmond Heights and Webster Groves, as well as Washington University and Fontbonne University.

Bill Greenblatt I UPI

With St. Louis County no longer involved in funding a new football stadium in St. Louis, there’s some uncertainty about the public financing of the project. But during a stop in Earth City on Wednesday, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon expressed confidence that the money will be there to build the facility.

Ferguson police headquarters on March 3, 2015
File photo by UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Nearly a month ago, the U.S. Department of Justice released a scathing report on the Ferguson Police Department. The federal Civil Rights Division found the city's "law enforcement practices were shaped by the city's focus on revenue rather than on public safety needs," causing a pattern of stops and arrests that violated the constitutional rights of the city's majority black population.

A rendering of the St. Louis riverfront stadium.
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger says county taxpayers will no longer be asked to foot some of the bill for a new football stadium.

It’s a potentially complicating factor in conjuring up public financing to build the open-air facility on St. Louis' riverfront.

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner talks with reporters in O'Fallon, Illinois. Rauner expressed enthusastic support for bringing the NGA headquarters to the Metro East.
Katelyn Petrin I St. Louis Public Radio

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner is bullish about an effort to get the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency to relocate near Scott Air Force Base.

The federal government is mulling over several locations to relocate the NGA’s facility, which is currently in south St. Louis. That includes a location near Scott Air Force Base, as well sites in north St. Louis, south St. Louis County and Fenton.

Spence Jackson
From his LinkedIn page

Spence Jackson, spokesman for the late Missouri auditor Tom Schweich, was found dead in his apartment Sunday, according to a press release from the Jefferson City Police Department. His death is being investigated as a suicide.

Gov. Jay Nixon may soon decide his pick to replace state Auditor Tom Schweich. Nixon appointed John Watson earlier this year as an interim auditor while he mulls a permanent selection.
Bill Greenblatt I UPI

Filling Tom Schweich’s void in the state auditor’s office may be one of the most important decisions of Gov. Jay Nixon’s tenure. He’ll have to pick somebody who can perform the tasks of an important office – and contend with the rigors of maneuvering through statewide politics.

(via Flickr/lowjumpingfrog)

What if you held an election and hardly anyone showed up?

Missouri Republican Party Chairman John Hancock
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

This week’s episode of Politically Speaking features Missouri Republican Party Chairman John Hancock, who has been under fire for weeks, in a candid conversation with St. Louis Public Radio reporters Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies.

Michel Martin led a two-hour discussion March 23, 2015, about changes in the St. Louis region seven months after Michael Brown's death. This was the second Ferguson and Beyond forum that Martin has moderated, both at Wellspring Church in Ferguson.
Jason Rosenbaum / St. Louis Public Radio

Since Michael Brown was shot and killed last year, people within the St. Louis region have been immersed in social and public policy introspection.

House Speaker John Diehl presides over the Missouri House last week. Diehl, R-Town and Country, has rejected the idea of pursuing a "Ferguson agenda," but adds the House will take up bills changing municipal courts.
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

At first glance, state Sen. Bob Dixon wouldn’t be an obvious choice to spearhead legislation responding to the unrest in and around Ferguson.

State Rep. Bob Burns' legislation would make it easier to hold disincorporation elections in St. Louis County.
Tim Bommel, House Communications

Legislation is advancing through the Missouri General Assembly to make it easier to dissolve St. Louis County’s municipalities.

On this week’s edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio reporters Jason Rosenbaum, Jo Mannies and Rachel Lippmann welcome St. Louis Alderwoman Donna Baringer to the show.

Three seats on the Ferguson City Council will be up for grabs on April 7. Eight candidates are running for the spots, including four African-Americans.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

The big question may be why. Why — after months of being in the red-hot glare of the national and international media in the aftermath of the police shooting of Michael Brown — would eight people decide to run for seats on the beleaguered Ferguson City Council, all for a part-time job that pays $250 a month?

State Treasurer Clint Zweifel speaks to the St. Louis Regional Chamber on Friday, March 13, 2015.
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Soon after Michael Brown’s shooting death sparked riots and protests that jolted businesses in and around Ferguson, state Treasurer Clint Zweifel decided to get the lay of the land.

Speaking to the St. Louis Regional Chamber, Zweifel said he didn’t look to consultants or political figures for help. Nor did try to figure out solutions from a distance.

Ferguson's Police Department
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Tony Rice was waiting very patiently yesterday outside Ferguson City Hall.

With a cell phone in hand, Rice was awaiting the official announcement of Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson’s departure, which sparked protests later that evening, which ended with two police shot.

House Majority Leader Todd Richardson
Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

This week’s Politically Speaking is a southeast Missouri affair as St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome House Majority Leader Todd Richardson to the show.

Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

The dominoes keep falling in Ferguson.

Embattled police chief Thomas Jackson will resign March 19, the city announced Wednesday afternoon. He is the sixth Ferguson employee to step down or be fired since a scathing Department of Justice report found that Jackson's officers routinely and deliberately violated the civil rights of Ferguson's mostly African-American population.

John Shaw, left, resigned on Tuesday as Ferguson's city manager.
File photo by Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

The shakeup of Ferguson’s government continued in earnest on Tuesday with the resignation of city manager John Shaw.

It’s easily the most significant departure yet from a Ferguson city official since a Department of Justice report sharply criticized the city's police department and municipal court system.

Ferguson City Manager John Shaw, left, and Mayor James Knowles on Nov. 30, 2014.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Ferguson says it looks forward to working with the Missouri Court of Appeals judge who will hear its municipal court cases starting next week.

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