Jason Rosenbaum

Political Reporter

Since entering the enticing world of professional journalism in the mid-2000s, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and in the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in St. Louis City with with his wife Lauren Todd, an engineering librarian at Washington University. Their son, Brandon Todd Rosenbaum, was born in February 2014.

HUD Secretary Julian Castro readies himself to announce $26 million in federal funds to St. Louis County.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will provide more than $26 million to St. Louis County for residential and commercial development.

It’s the second time in recent months HUD made a high-profile resources-related announcement in the St. Louis area.

Ferguson October protesters
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

The American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri and other legal groups are blasting a decision by the attorney for St. Louis County to charge Ferguson protesters, many almost a year after they were arrested.

But St. Louis County's counselor is defending the process for charging dozens of people — including a couple of  journalists.

Richardson enters the House Lounge for an end-of-session press conference on Friday.
File photo | Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

(Updated 3 p.m. Wed., Aug. 19, with proposals from state House Minority Whip John Rizzo)

As lawmakers continue to mull over changes to the Missouri Capitol’s intern program, the speaker of the Missouri House is putting the kibosh on changes to the chamber’s dress code.

It’s a proposal that sparked an intense backlash from some elected officials, including U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill.

Stadium task force co-chair Dave Peacock presents revised stadium plan to the Missouri Development Finance Board. The stadium project is asking for $15 million in tax breaks this year and plans to ask for $17.5 million each in 2016 and 2017.
Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated with vote - The Missouri Development Finance Board Tuesday approved tax breaks to help fund a proposed new NFL stadium in St. Louis. This vote was for $15 million out of what's expected to be a total of $50 million in credits.

It's part of a revised stadium proposal that would cost $998 million, including $820 million for sight clearance and construction.

St. Louis City Hall
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

A major credit rating agency has released a report downgrading St. Louis' ratings.

In a report that was released last Friday, Moody’s Investors Services downgraded by one notch the city’s $27.4 million worth of general obligation bonds. It also dropped the rating on the St. Louis Municipal Finance Corporation's, $123.5 million of “outstanding rated lease revenue debt issued for essential purposes,” as well as the corporation's $138.6 million “of outstanding rated lease revenue debt issued for non-essential purposes.”

Moody’s decision could make it more expensive for the city to borrow money.

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin, right, and Madison County State's Attorney Tom Gibbons take part in a roundtable on heroin abuse on Monday in Granite City.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin provided a fairly blunt reply to the proposition that the War on Drugs failed.

“By some measure, it has failed,” said Durbin, D-Ill. “If the measure is the cost of drugs on the street, it has failed. But when we look at the individual lives saved, there are certainly heroic great stories to be told. But we have to be honest about what works and what doesn’t.”

State Rep. Cloria Brown
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On this edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies continue their look into south St. Louis County politics by welcoming state Rep. Cloria Brown onto the show.

Brown is a city of St. Louis native who had a successful career in information technology. After working her way through several jobs, Brown eventually became vice president of information systems for MasterCard International. She was one of the few women to be a leader in the male-dominated field.

St. Louis County Police form a line in front of protesters on Tuesday. They were put in charge of securing protests on Monday when St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger called a state of emergency.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 10 a.m. Friday with lifting of state of emergency. On a cloudless Tuesday night on West Florissant Avenue, the mood was relatively calm. A few dozen protesters, onlookers and media milled about on a parking lot – a far cry from chaos that struck the thoroughfare on Sunday night.

Normandy Mayor Patrick Green and Cool Valley Mayor Viola Murphy
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On a special edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum welcomes two mayors of small north St. Louis County to the show talk about a sweeping overhaul of the state’s municipal courts system.

State Rep. Vicki Englund
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On this week’s edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome (back) former state Rep. Vicki Englund, a Green Park Democrat who's served two terms in the Missouri House.

Englund served two non-consecutive terms in the Missouri House, representing competitive territory in south St. Louis County.

St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger
File photo by Alex Heuer I St. Louis Public Radio

After a relatively calm Tuesday night in Ferguson, St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger may be close to lifting his state of emergency order. But it won't happen on Wednesday.

Tuesday's protests on West Florissant Avenue were largely uneventful. While police pushed protesters out of the street, most people along the thoroughfare mingled with each other and marched around the street without incident. 

Protesters march toward the Federal Courthouse in downtown St. Louis on August 10.
Sarah Kellogg | St. Louis Public Radio

Last updated 8:08 a.m. Tuesday

After a Sunday night marked by violence in Ferguson,  Monday brought with it an emergency declaration in St. Louis County, dozens arrested at a protest at the federal courthouse, comments from U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch and a temporary shut-down of Interstate 70. Monday night, some were arrested in Ferguson but there was no gunfire or property damage.

A young girl walks near a memorial for Michael Brown. Hundreds of people converged near the spot where Brown was killed to honor the 18-year-old
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Sunday was the first time Erica Garner stepped foot in Ferguson.

She’s the daughter of Eric Garner, a man who was choked to death by a New York police officer. She ventured to the St. Louis region to pay tribute to Michael Brown, the 18-year-old who became a symbol for a growing movement to change policing.

St. Louis County Lt. Col. Ken Gregory talks to Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson. Ferguson Mayor James Knowles (bottom right) and Michael Brown Sr. (bottom left) along with many area leaders attended a St. Louis County NAACP brunch Friday, Aug. 7, 2015.
Sarah Kellogg | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis County NAACP is launching two new initiatives on the eve of the first anniversary of the death of Michael Brown: one to provide free legal services to children and one to push municipalities to improve police training.

In response to a report released last week by the U.S. Department of Justice, the NAACP branch is starting a program for attorneys to represent children facing long-term school suspension or charges in the juvenile justice system on a pro-bono basis.

Michael Brown, Sr., (second from the right) stands in front of the temporary memorial dedicated to his son Michael Brown, Jr. earlier this year. Brown's death had a monumental impact on the city of Ferguson -- and the St. Louis region.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On a cloudless July morning, there’s a tranquil aura around the Corner Coffee House as the clock ticks closer to the Aug. 9 anniversary of Michael Brown’s death. Daily protests have petered out and the hordes of reporters who camped out here have moved onto the next story – at least until this weekend.

But for Ferguson residents like John Powell, there is no new normal. There’s no Aug. 8. The Catholic school teacher who’s lived in Ferguson for nine years says the town he once knew will never be the same. 

St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

With the clock ticking closer to the anniversary of Michael Brown’s shooting death, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch for a special edition of Politically Speaking.

Tear gas was used in Ferguson. Nov. 24 2014
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

A year after Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson and the unrest that ensued, many of the major political players continue to reassess, reappraise and reflect.

Ferguson Mayor James Knowles III prepares to hand a resolution to a city resident. Knowles reflected on how his city's changed since Michael Brown's death earlier this week.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

In a year filled with trials and tribulations that few municipal officials face in a lifetime, Ferguson Mayor James Knowles learned quite a bit.

Throughout the 12 months that followed Michael Brown’s death at the hands of a former Ferguson police officer, Knowles said his city found out the hard way how important it is for a government to communicate with its residents. Just because somebody doesn’t speak up at a council meeting or through an e-mail, Knowles said, doesn’t mean “there aren’t issues out there that need to be addressed.”

Former Cass County Prosecutor Teresa Hensley
Courtesy of Hensley's Twitter page

When Scott Sifton bowed out of the attorney general’s race last week, Democrats appeared to avoid a resource-draining primary battle between the Affton state senator and St. Louis County Assessor Jake Zimmerman. 

Well, at least for a few hours.

Before the preverbal ink (or, in this site’s case, pixels) dried on Sifton’s departure from the 2016 statewide scene, former Cass County Teresa Hensley announced she would enter the Democratic scramble for attorney. It showed that if the goal of getting Sifton out of the attorney general’s race was to avoid a primary, that plan didn’t really succeed.

Scott Sifton
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On this week’s edition of Politically Speaking, state Sen. Scott Sifton joins St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies to talk about his decision to scuttle his attorney general bid.