Joseph Leahy

Reporter

Leahy anchors St. Louis Public Radio's weekday afternoon newscasts and produces news on local and regional issues. He previously produced and reported news for WERS 88.9 FM in Boston and is a former correspondent for the Boston Globe’s online news section, "Your Town." He holds a master's degree in print and multimedia journalism from Emerson College in Boston.  

Born in Kansas City, Mo., Joseph grew up migrating almost annually with his family between two disparate homes: rural Missouri and sprawling Los Angeles. He attended the University of California before transferring to the University of Missouri to complete a bachelor's degree in English.

Ways To Connect

via Flickr/Michael R. Allen

Lambert Airport is now screening luggage checked at Terminal 1 with a new automated baggage system.

The $50.7 million assembly of ramps, conveyor belts and X-rays replaces the bomb detection machines that were installed in ticketing areas after the 9/11 terrorists attacks.

Watch below for a bag’s-eye-view of the bomb-detecting security system:

St. Louis Public Radio Staff

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen is taking a stand against so-called "right to work" legislation that's moving through the Missouri Legislature.

(via Flickr/pasa47)

Emerson Electric is giving $5 million to help restore and maintain Forest Park.

The gift is the largest ever given by a publicly traded company to Forest Park Forever – the private non-profit that's partnered with the city to maintain the 1,371-acre park.

The money will help pay for new improvement projects and secure the park for future generations, said Forest Park Forever President and Executive Director Lesley Hoffarth.

Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis is unusual among American cities in having so many streets and places with French names.  Over centuries, its residents have also adopted some unusual ways of pronouncing them.

While these interpretations could make many modern French speakers cringe, some echo the original dialect of the city when it was still a part of New France. In other words – maybe we shouldn’t feel so bad about how we pronounce “Chouteau” these days.

 

 

St. Louis Public Radio Staff / St. Louis Public Radio

Metro is proposing to increase its bus and train fares this July, pending approval by the Board of Commissioners. The fare hikes are needed to offset rising operational costs, including fuel, vehicle parts and medical benefits for staff, said Communications Director Patti Beck.

"This fare increase will help financially support our existing Metro transit system and preserve plans for future service enhancements,” she said.

Metro is proposing three options in changing fares, to raise an additional $2.2 million. 

Veronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri has retaken its position as the number two beef cow producer in the nation. The USDA’s annual inventory shows the state surpassed Nebraska with a 63,000-increase in cows from 2012 to 2013.

Dry weather across the country had a lot to do with Missouri reclaiming the spot which it held from 1983 to 2008, said University of Missouri agriculture economist Scott Brown.

St. Louis County Assessor's Office

The St. Louis County Assessor’s Office will undertake a review of all tax-exempt properties in the county to confirm their owners still qualify for the tax break.

Exemptions have been granted to thousands of non-profit groups because their properties are used for charitable, religious or educational purposes, but some of them no longer qualify, said County Assessor Jake Zimmerman.

Joseph Leahy | St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon

Thousands walked above the icy Mississippi River Saturday as governors, senators and U.S. representatives from Illinois and Missouri cut the ribbon on the new Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge.

The $230 million, cable-stayed structure is the culmination of a decades-long effort to relieve congestion on the nearby Poplar Street and Martin Luther King Bridges.

Kristi Luther | St. Louis Public Radio

  • Construction began in April 2010.
  • The bridge cost came in at $670 million including land acquisition, utility relocation and construction
  • The total bridge span has 16.367 million pounds of structural steel and 12 million pounds of reinforcing steel.

Area residents will have a rare chance Saturday to see the new Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge up close before it officially opens to vehicle traffic on Sunday.

St. Louis Public Radio

Leaders of the multi-pronged plan to transform the Gateway Arch Grounds and surrounding streets downtown gave their fourth presentation in as many years Wednesday about the progress and challenges faced so far on the $380 million project.

Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

The Food and Drug Administration has a plan in the works that may affect your appetite. It wants to ban partially hydrogenated oils -- the major source of artificial trans fats in the U. S. food supply.

How will that impact St. Louis area bakeries, donut shops and grocery stores?

Like many mom-and-pop donut shops in St. Louis, the Donut Stop in Lemay fries with partially hydrogenated shortening – good for glaze retention, shelf life, and mouth feel.

via Wikimedia Commons

After spiking in early January, cases of the flu appear to have subsided in the St. Louis area.

According to the St. Louis County Health Department, the 92 influenza-like illnesses recorded for the week ending Jan. 19 was 151 fewer than the first week of January. St. Louis City numbers for last week have yet to be released.

Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

Thousands of St. Louis-area residents celebrated the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with ceremonies, music and marches over the three-day weekend.

Christ Church Cathedral in downtown St. Louis hosted readings on Monday of King's writings, sermons and speeches from the same pulpit where he once preached 50 years ago.

via Wikimedia Commons

Officials at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis say nine people have died from the H1N1 flu virus, also known as swine flu, over the past six weeks. Another 35 patients were sick enough to be treated in the hospital’s intensive care unit, although, many were transported from outside the area.

Infectious Disease Physician Steven Lawrence says those who died ranged in age from their mid-20s to their mid-60s.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated Jan. 13, 2014:

The legal back-and-forth over the release of the names to the plaintiff continues. The state Supreme Court today blocked the Archdiocese from having to comply with Dierker’s order until further notice.

Updated Jan. 10, 2014:

Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis City officials are mobilizing to protect the city's homeless population as an arctic weather front is forecast to plunge the region into sub-zero temperatures late this weekend.

The National Weather Service says a winter storm could dump nearly a foot of snow on the St. Louis area by Sunday evening. The overnight low temperature on Sunday is forecast to reach -8 degrees with daytime highs on Monday peaking near -2 degrees.

Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

The Transportation Security Administration is clearing more than a quarter of the nation's commercial passengers for expedited screening as it expands its PreCheck program. Nationwide, the number of airports participating in the program has expanded from about 40 last year to more than 100 today.

During a press conference at Lambert Airport Tuesday, Federal Security Director William Switzer said travelers can now find separate screening lines at all concourses.

via Flickr/Michael R. Allen

Lambert-St. Louis International Airport is preparing for a surge in visitors as the busy travel period surrounding Christmas and New Year’s Day begins Friday.

Public Relations Manager Jeff Lea says the airport is expecting a 15 to 20 percent increase from normal passenger traffic at peak travel times over the next two weeks.

“The biggest travel day prior to Christmas for air travel is going to be Friday,” he said.

In addition, he adds that holiday travelers can expect to be flying with a significant number of men and women in uniform as well.

Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio and The Beacon

Ed Lammering wore his top hat to a groundbreaking last month beside the Gateway Arch, but left his horse, Lukes, at the St. Louis Carriage Company’s stable on the other side of Busch Stadium.  He held a sign which read, “Where do we stand? – carriage drivers.”

The carriage company is among several businesses that have concerns about the impact of the $360 million CityArchRiver 2015 project. Work will include expanding the Arch grounds over Interstate 70, carving out a new central entrance for the underground museum and numerous other major improvements.

(via Flickr/steakpinball)

A state representative in the Metro East wants to stiffen the punishment for random assaults often referred to as the 'knockout' game. The so-called 'game' involves punching an unsuspecting person in the head with the goal of rendering them unconscious.

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