Joseph Leahy | St. Louis Public Radio

Joseph Leahy

Reporter and afternoon newscaster

Joseph Leahy began his career in broadcast journalism at St. Louis Public Radio in 2011. He moved to Delaware in 2012 to help launch the state’s first NPR station, 91.1 FM WDDE, as a general assignment reporter, afternoon newscaster and host. Leahy returned to Missouri in 2013 to anchor St. Louis Public Radio’s local newscasts during NPR’s All Thing’s Considered and produce news on local and regional issues. His education includes a master’s degree in print and multimedia journalism from Emerson College in Boston and a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Missouri. He graduated high school at Highland Hall Waldorf School in Northridge, California and grew up migrating almost annually with his family between rural Missouri and sprawling Los Angeles. He was born in Kansas City, Missouri in 1982. 

(Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio)

East St. Louis nightclubs and other local businesses are bankrolling extra weekend police patrols after a series of violent crimes.

Mayor Alvin Parks Jr. says the city needs more officers on the street but cannot afford them on its own.

“This is taking already existing officers and paying them to work this special detail," Parks said. "A detail that will be about six officers downtown and another two in the rest of the city where there might be late night activity.”

derekGavey | Flickr

Silicon Valley has been the place for IT development since the dawn of the computer age, but new technology and cheaper resources are leveling the playing field for other cities across the country. As St. Louis Public Radio’s Joseph Leahy reports, a network of local business leaders is pushing to make St. Louis a regional hub for IT start-up companies.

View Larger Map

Occupy activists are taking heat for graffiti found at the Compton Hill Reservoir Park. Overnight, walls and statues were vandalized with phrases including "class war," and "cops, pigs, murderers."

Occupy protester Brian Staack  says the acts are likely related to a confrontation at the park Thursday night where St. Louis police arrested 13 activists.

(Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio)

Rev. Al Sharpton is joining Missouri Congressman Lacy Clay in opposing efforts to require voters to show photo IDs at the polls.  

Last year, Republicans in 38 states introduced legislation that would require a state-approved photo ID to vote. Seven states have since signed it into law.

Sharpton joined Clay in St. Louis Friday at a voter rights forum to oppose a similar law from passing in Missouri.  “We've got to turn this around," Sharpton said. "And start targeting in Missouri those legislators that are targeting our right to vote,” he said.

Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio

Occupy movements from across the country are gathering this week in St. Louis to revive their populist protests against banks, corporations and government.

Rachael Perrotta, a media coordinator from Occupy Chicago said the regional conference will stage at least four non-violent group actions in St. Louis against various companies including Monsanto.

“Welcome to the American Spring," Perrotta said. "Our movement is expanding. We're growing. Winter was the time for internal organizing. Spring is the time to get back into the streets." 

Romney in Kirkwood in 2012
Bill Greenblatt | UPI | File photo

Updated at 5:04 p.m. with additional information from the event.

Former Massachusetts Governor and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney rallied for support at a park in the St. Louis suburb of Kirkwood Tuesday.

Republican caucuses are underway in Missouri, as the process to select a presidential nominee continues, but  the party's front-runner ignored his Republican rivals. Instead, he attacked President Barak Obama, blaming him for a high gasoline prices.

Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio

A minority business advocacy group says the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District needs to do more to include minority and female workers in its projected $4.7 billion worth of upgrades over the next two decades.  

Yaphett El-Amin, executive director for the group MOKAN, says because city residents and businesses pay into MSD's sewer tax system, MSD should commit more jobs to local minority contractors.  

“We need a full commitment from MSD to support our region and help our businesses grow," El-Amin said, "to help our economy and hire our community.”

 

(via Wikimedia Commons / SSGTCHADRGANN)

Hundreds of local Air National Guard jobs are on the chopping block as part of the Defense Department’s plan to cut $500 billion over the next decade.

Missouri Congressman Todd Akin, chairman of the Seapower and Projection Forces Subcommittee, says more than 700 servicemen at Jefferson Barracks in St. Louis and Scott Air Force Base near Belleville, Ill. may lose their jobs by the end of the fiscal year.

(Andrew Gates/MoDOT)

Warmer weather this month has the Missouri Department of Transportation zeroing in on St. Louis potholes. For the month of March, maintenance crews have pledged to respond to any pothole complaint within 24 hours. 

Tom Blair, the assistant district engineer for MoDOT in St. Louis, said catching potholes now will make MoDOT’s job easier down the road.

" Because the temperatures are warming up, we’re not going to see that re-freeze that’s going to cause the potholes to come back out. So, if we fix them now, they’re likely to stay fixed for quite a while," he said.

Both sides of the debate on how St. Louis would handle local control of its police department are digging in their heels over issues of public oversight and transparency.

At a Board of Alderman community forum last night, critics argued that language on a proposed ballot initiative would preclude the department from a civilian review board and restrict public access to disciplinary records. 

John Chasnoff is a program director for the ACLU, which supports local control but is suing to block the initiative.

Joseph Leahy, St. Louis Public Radio

Consumer advocates are pressing Enterprise Rent-a-Car to support a bill to keep rental cars that are subject to federal recall off the road.

Joan Bray of the Consumers Council of Missouri says while the St. Louis-based company has agreed in principle, it should endorse a Congressional amendment named for two sisters who were killed while driving a PT Cruiser under recall.

Metro Transit - St. Louis

Warmer weather, a sunnier economy, and higher gas prices are driving more riders to public transportation in St. Louis. Overall Metro ridership was up 8 percent in the last half of 2011 compared to the previous year. 

Dianne Williams is Metro's director of communications.

"Twenty-three million times someone stepped on a metro bus, a metro train, or a metro caller ride. That's up about 2 million boardings from the same period last year," Williams said.

Tim Heitz / Midwest Meteorites

A New Mexico man is in custody for stealing a meteorite that turned up in St. Louis on Christmas Eve. 

St. Louis meteorite dealer Tim Heitz says a man called him Dec. 21 with a meteorite for sale.

“The man told me that it belonged to his father and his father was a rock collector," Heitz said.

"He said he knew it was worth a lot more, but he needed the money to buy Christmas presents for his wife and his kids.”

(National Cancer Institute)

Spikes and dips in cancer rates are not uncommon in public health statistics, but explaining why they occur and deciding what to do about them can often be as difficult as treating the disease itself. St. Louis Public Radio's Joseph Leahy takes a look at St. Louis County where the prostate cancer rate is unusually high. 

St. Louis Public Radio

The Southwestern Flood Prevention District Council says too much is at stake for any more delays in fixing levees in Metro East. 

Les Sterman, the project's supervisor for the Council says the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has so far taken too long in approving plans to work on the levees.

He said their latest plan approval was six months late.

“Essentially we're doing our part," Sterman said. "All we're asking is for the federal agency to do its part in helping us get this project moving.”

Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin is touting new measures to increase security for public housing residents in East St. Louis. The federally-funded plan includes installing cameras at six high-rise properties and hiring a new security coordinator.

"We're going to be putting up lighting and fencing," Durbin said. "We're going to move forward to try to make sure the almost 4,500 residents of public housing in East St. Louis have a safer place to live."

(Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio)

Time is running out for a bipartisan commission tasked with agreeing on a new Missouri Senate district map. The filing period for senate candidates begins next week, but without definitive district boundaries, they won't know exactly which district they would be running to represent. 

The commission's chairman Doug Harpool says if seven of the ten commission members fail to agree on a map, a federal judge will be appointed to determine the district boundaries.

(Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public)

Lambert Airport is honoring African American pilots who broke color barriers in the sky with a re-dedication of its mural “Black Americans in Flight.”

Solomon Thurman, one of the mural's co-artists, said the five-panel mural depicts the aviation achievements of African Americans from WWI to the NASA shuttle mission. 

"St. Louis is the only place where you can see an encapsulated story of the Tuskegee Airmen," he said. "There are many Tuskegee paintings around the country and perhaps around the world, but none tell the cohesive story."

Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis County is considering changing farmers’ markets ordinances to make it easier for food venders to do business. Instead of a $35 permit which lasts two weeks, the new permits would last seven-months, and cost $75. 

St. Louis County Health Department Director Dolores Gunn says the seven-month length – as opposed to a year – is intended to prevent abuses of the system.

Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

Some residents in the St. Louis suburb of Rock Hill are fighting to save the historic church their town is named after. The Rock Hill Presbyterian Church on the corner of McKnight and Manchester Roads is slated for demolition to make way for a gas station this spring.

Linda Lemen is among a group of citizens seeking to relocate the limestone structure. 

“It may be radical," she said, "but you have to choose your battles in life and you have to choose what is important.”

Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

Governor Jay Nixon is putting Missouri's athletic organizations to work in helping to rebuild Joplin.

Teaming with the Joplin Area Habitat for Humanity, Nixon is challenging members from the St. Louis Rams and Cardinals among other teams across the state to build 35 houses by June.

 "When people know that these sports teams are coming, and when they see the players and the other folks, it really really helps," said Nixon.

(Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio)

Troubled Missouri home owners can expect a degree of relief from a national mortgage settlement that has been reached with five of the nation’s largest mortgage lenders.

The Show-Me State is being awarded more than $196 million of a $25 billion settlement with banks -- including Bank of America and JP Morgan Chase -- over allegations of lending abuses and improper foreclosure procedures.

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster says the settlement does not close the door on possible criminal charges against mortgage lenders.

via Flickr/Michael R. Allen

Some passengers at Lambert Airport will be allowed to keep their belts and shoes on while passing through security checkpoints.

The Transportation Security Administration is including St. Louis in a program to make check-in more convenient for frequent fliers. The TSA says the program, which has been tested at seven major airports, will expand to 28 others, including Lambert, this year. 

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay and other local leaders are endorsing Susan Montee in her campaign for Lieutenant Governor. None of the four Democrats in the race for the office are from St. Louis -- Missouri's largest voting bloc. Thus, Montee's endorsement from St. Louis city officials gives her a strong lead as she seeks the nomination.

Montee, the former state auditor, kicked off her campaign at St. Louis City Hall Tuesday saying she knows how to fight for veterans and seniors.

(Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio)

America’s obsession with chop suey may have ended almost a century ago, but in St. Louis chop suey shops remain in large numbers.  As St. Louis Public Radio’s Joseph Leahy reports, the city is just one of three where this food fad continues to hang on.

(via Flickr/[F]oxymoron)

Updated 5:08 p.m.

Ameren Missouri is seeking approval from state regulators to raise electricity rates by almost 15 percent. Ameren President and CEO Warner Baxter said the company needs the additional $376 million to cover infrastructure upgrades and higher fuel costs. 

"With this electric rate increase filing," he said, "we are simply seeking to recover the costs and investments we have made to meet our customers' expectations for a safe and reliable clean energy." 

(Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis Archbishop Robert Carlson says some schools in the archdiocese will have to close in the years ahead to sustain Missouri's oldest and largest school system.

"I just think it's inevitable when you look at the number of children families are having," he said.

The Archbishop said school consolidations are also likely to play a bigger part in addressing shrinking enrollment and tuition revenue, as when three south county elementary schools consolidated last year to create Holy Cross Academy. 

Joseph Leahy | St. Louis Public Radio | File photo

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay and the St. Louis Police Officers Association are throwing their support behind a voter's initiative proposal that would give St. Louis direct control of its police department.

The Safer Missouri Citizens Coalition is seeking 100,000 signatures by May sixth to put the proposal on this November's ballot. Jeff Roorda, business manager for the St. Louis Police Officers' Association, said opponents who argue the bill would limit public oversight and access to records are misleading the public.

(file photo)

Anti-smoking advocates want more smoking bans

Groups against smoking are urging the St. Louis County Council to make changes to the smoking ban that went into effect last year.

Currently, businesses whose food sales result in 25 percent of gross sales including food, alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks are eligible for an exemption from the smoking ban. There are 145 businesses that currently allow smoking in the county.

Flickr/jdnx

Gateway Arch project may not be finished by anniversary

The 50th anniversary of the Gateway Arch is three years away, but the project to improve and expand the grounds by then may not be finished on time.

Walter Metcalfe, director of the CityArchRiver 2015 Foundation, which is leading the effort, says it's more important to get it right than to get it done in time for the anniversary.

Pages